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How do I clean this tar and broken concrete?

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 33 total)
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  • #345281
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Inherited this mess from previous owner of my house.

    Yep, the black stuff is driveway tar. The guy must have been drunk and blindfolded when he did that mess!

    I also have a broken edge that I have no idea how to fix, which is not critical to do so anyways.

    But the black tar on the concrete is an eyesore and we’re about to have a new driveway put in this summer and it will really stick out then.

    HELP!

    #345299
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    Your best bet on the tar would probably be to scrape as much of it off as you can with a floor scraper or flat shovel then hit it with a pressure washer. The tar that is left I would put some paint thinner on it, let it sit then hit it the scraper again then another round with the pressure washer.

    As far as the broken edge on the concrete apron…It is a pretty small area so a patch probably wouldn’t work for long. The best bet may be to cut/break that section out and re-pour it. Or leave it alone.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #345300
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I would scrape it like Chad said.

    After that, consult the other running thread about how to clean junk off of concrete…I’m not sure much more can be said.

    You may consider grinding what’s left after scraping and having it repaired when the driveway is done.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #345308
    sergey061478
    Blocked

    Scraping it like Chad had suggested would be your best bet. I think that another option would be trying to hit it with a floor grinder. Or just a grinder with diamond cup wheel installed. That;s my suggestions, others many have different ideas.

    #345323
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    @Doobie,
    Hit with a HOT scraper, it will be a lot easier to scrape with heat. Possibly even a heat gun. Then with what is left, try a solvent like naphtha to dissolve whats left.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #345352
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Wouldn’t heat just make the tar sticky(…er) and make it more difficult to chip away?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #345374
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Wouldn’t heat just make the tar sticky(…er) and make it more difficult to chip away?

    That’s what I was thinking as well. If anything, freeze it somehow, then try chipping/scrapping it off.

    Isn’t that one of the tricks for getting gum off as well?

    Never done it for either, but once the heat suggestion came forward, it got me thinking the opposite and having temperature working me a favour except using cold instead of hot.

    #345410
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    The right amount of heat may loosen the chunks of tar up from the concrete so they would scrape off easier. Tar dissolves in mineral spirits – that may be worth a try.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #345449
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    What about heat and a power washer, I think that’s what the street cleaners do. Or stream pressure washer.

    #345478
    Doobie
    Moderator

    What about heat and a power washer, I think that’s what the street cleaners do. Or stream pressure washer.

    I don’t get the connection.

    #345491
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Use a propane torch to heat the tar to make it easier to scrape. The broken section I would demo out and repour.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #345515
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    We have had good luck in situations like that removing about 2′ of concrete across the entire front of the garage on the inside that would include the apron. we dowel the joint and re-pour the 2′ area. that gets rid of both the spalled concrete and the tar in one operation

    #345553
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    We have had good luck in situations like that removing about 2′ of concrete across the entire front of the garage on the inside that would include the apron. we dowel the joint and re-pour the 2′ area. that gets rid of both the spalled concrete and the tar in one operation

    That works too. Does anyone know of a concrete adhesion enhancer in situations such as this to promote a better bond between the old and new concrete?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #345580
    Doobie
    Moderator

    We have had good luck in situations like that removing about 2′ of concrete across the entire front of the garage on the inside that would include the apron. we dowel the joint and re-pour the 2′ area. that gets rid of both the spalled concrete and the tar in one operation

    That works too. Does anyone know of a concrete adhesion enhancer in situations such as this to promote a better bond between the old and new concrete?

    Bingo! I would wonder the same and need to know the same.

    Frankly, I don’t think there was an easy solution on the chipped out concrete. Just a wear and tear mini eyesore to suffer with.

    The tar over the top is another issue. If I can at least deal with that. The old driveway is nothing to be proud of against. The new one will pop those imbecile tar stains/marks looking like a scabs in my estimation.

    #345581
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    We have had good luck in situations like that removing about 2′ of concrete across the entire front of the garage on the inside that would include the apron. we dowel the joint and re-pour the 2′ area. that gets rid of both the spalled concrete and the tar in one operation

    That works too. Does anyone know of a concrete adhesion enhancer in situations such as this to promote a better bond between the old and new concrete?

    They sell all kinds of them, but rebar would work better!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #345585

    Yeah, they sell them at the big box stores in Canada, reno depot, I presume even rona. It is a white liquid, looks a lot like Elmer wood glue. The cement has to be wet when it’s applied, they can inform you. I have even used a cement that has special additives for your problems.

    Good luck. Like @kurt@welkerhomes.com mentioned that maybe a good thing to do.

    #345624
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    Since you’re having a new drive put in anyway, have the tarry area broken out and repoured when the rest of the drive is done.
    If you just try to fill the small gap, it will break out over a few years (months?).

    It looks like the driveway has dropped some, leading me to think that it wasn’t tied to to garage slab, reinforced adequately, or the base wasn’t compacted correctly. I’m on clay and it shrinks and expands depending on how dry/wet it’s been. It’s the only way this Southern boy can imagine frost heave. Lots of driveways do that here. I water the edges of my drive during dry spells by sticking a hose in the crack between the soil and the concrete.

    Suggestion – bust out what had tar slopped on it. Compact what’s under it correctly. Reinforce the area with at least 4″ welded wire (rebar is preferable) and fill in the gap with concrete.

    How far does the tar go back from the garage?

    It may have been easier to clean/chip off while frozen. Maybe try dry ice then pressure wash?
    Without burning the house down or hurting yourself, see if any gobs come off with mineral spirits, light it to minimize the amount of residue, then pressure wash. Maybe a propane torch? While molten, it’s like napalm – it sticks and doesn’t come off.

    This would have qualified under the Hacks thread, but maybe you can get some help here 🙂 .

    (edit) Would an expansion joint help here? Mine doesn’t have one where the drive meets the slab.

    #345663
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m realizing now some potential remedies do not have the full picture of what is beyond that garage door. My raised shop floor.

    #345718
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    @Dobbie,
    I was Depot earlier grabbing some paint and saw this staring right at me saying “Tell Doobie I’m here” 🙂

    Mentions that it will remove Oil & Tar.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #345784
    Doobie
    Moderator

    @Dobbie,
    I was Depot earlier grabbing some paint and saw this staring right at me saying <strong class=”d4pbbc-bold”>“Tell Doobie I’m here” :)

    Mentions that it will remove Oil & Tar.

    I’ve seen that stuff before, but always in a little tiny bottle at the checkout and not some Costco army sized unit like that!

    Might be an option although as the additional post photos I posted show, immediately near where the tar mess is, is the base of my shop flooring system which I wouldn’t want to get messed up with a liquid type of cleaning solution. Not to say it can’t be done, but a dry solution would likely be easier to deal with.

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