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Historical Carpentry

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  • #378911

    This kind of goes along with the post I made about the Guitarde, the French dormer. I came across this from a FB group a few of us here are part of. There was a question about a woman holding a tool (yeah, cue the jokes) and what it was called. I knew what it was, had to look up the name…but that got me going on the French Charpentiere’s stuff.

    There are just some really, really cool old books out there if you are interested in researching (like I have for my whole life) about how things REALLY should be done. It saddens me to see how our society has just plummeted true craftsmanship into the toilet and are tying to enforce us to becoming a commodity. It’s a tough fight to battle against, but the history is there. The picutres, books, and such teach us how to do things properly. If you can mix history with today’s technology, that would be good enough for me…to at least TRY.

    Anywho, off my rant. This woman is holding a French Besaigue. It is essentially a long mortising chisel.

    This is one in action, but not sure if he is very talented with it.

    There’s a ton of other books and videos…it’s everywhere on the internet, all for free. All you need is a desire to be a student. Check out Google Books. Tons of scanned documents from the early 1900’s.

    #378912

    Oh, I forgot the most important part! This website, with a ton of interesting photos from the past. Sometimes I wish it were still like that. And then I recall that I like the invention of nice, soft cushy toilet paper.

    http://www.historicalcarpentry.com/captions-of-the-past—a-picture-is-worth-a-thousand-words.html?utm_source=Website+emails&utm_campaign=430f136fbb-Captions_of_the_Past7_24_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_59660c7a98-430f136fbb-27153601&ct=t%28Captions_of_the_Past7_24_2015%29

    #378927
    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    Very cool! Thanks for posting. We have a batu wood pergola going up on our showhome. Some of the pieces have a crown so I asked the boss to get me a jack plane to deal with it. I love old tools.

    #378929

    Kent, this is more great. Best part is your 2nd paragraph. It is powerful, which also makes it a difficult one to think about. How true it is!

    #378931
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Thanks for posting a link , they are all amazing pictures to say the least ! Most people could never imagine even coming close to doing amazing work like this . Not only extremely hard work but in many cases very dangerous work . They clearly never took no for an answer when it came to what was possible and what was not . 🙂

    #378937
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Man those are nice pictures. I like the one of the 2 guys hand sawing the planks. That must of been hard work.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #378958
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Thanks, Kent, those are great pics and fantastic work from the past.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #378966
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Great thread Kent. I have a few digital copies of carpenters pattern books from the late 1700’s and early 1800’s – some very impressive work in there! Another good source of some old carpentry books is this website:http://www.woodworkinghistory.com/manuals_1900-before.htm

    They have links to a lot of really good online resources.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #378969
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Kent, have you read Steve Chappell’s latest book, “Advanced Timber-Framing”?

    Even if you are not a timber-framer, the book is a great read. He’s a true construction philosopher, and talks a lot about the old ways, and traditional building. I think you might enjoy it.

    Delta

    #378978

    The Chapell’s live not too far from me. I was fortunate to receive one of their stainless steel framing squares as a gift from Tait. I have never met them, though I drive by their place many times on my way to the White Mountains.

    #379006
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Thanks, it’s amazing the work they did with very primitive tools.

    #379032

    Ah yes, but it wasn’t primitive to them! They were all like “look at this new cutting edge hand turning auger! I’m so jealous!”

    #379130
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Thanks, it’s amazing the work they did with very primitive tools.

    which means we should be able to one up them, do even better stuff. Unfortunately our society wants quick and wants easy.

    #379244
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Ah yes, but it wasn’t primitive to them! They were all like “look at this new cutting edge hand turning auger! I’m so jealous!”

    It is scary how fast things evolve. In this day and age things seem to moving super fast forward,,, or maybe we’re just ol farts?

    #379286
    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    Thanks for the links Kent… great stuff!

    I toured the Biltmore the other day, and could have spent a week marveling at the craftsmanship. Just amazing

    --Steve

    #379287

    Thanks for the links Kent… great stuff!

    I toured the Biltmore the other day, and could have spent a week marveling at the craftsmanship. Just amazing

    Vanderbilts…nice! We have a local victorian place that is the ooh factor, but nothing like that.

    #379441
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I toured the Biltmore the other day

    Is that the Biltmore house and Gardens in Asheville, NC??

    #379474
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Ah yes, but it wasn’t primitive to them! They were all like “look at this new cutting edge hand turning auger! I’m so jealous!”

    It is scary how fast things evolve. In this day and age things seem to moving super fast forward,,, or maybe we’re just ol farts?

    They do say we move at an exponential rate. And it will only get faster, only a few years ago we had computers at 486’s now we have octocores.

    #379508

    Oh…to have a bandsaw like that!

    #379515
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I toured the Biltmore the other day

    Is that the Biltmore house and Gardens in Asheville, NC??

    The Biltmore House in Asheville is a gorgeous place. My wife and I have been there a few times, a great example of period architecture and some amazing craftsmanship!

    Oh…to have a bandsaw like that!

    That is a massive bandsaw!

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

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