dcsimg

Hand planes…how to choose one, how to use one

This topic contains 219 replies, has 25 voices, and was last updated by  58Chev 2 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 161 through 180 (of 220 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #609609

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    As usual, Rob has some good advice. Thanks for sharing.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #609633

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    As usual, Rob has some good advice. Thanks for sharing.

    Ive never seen him before, but I like his delivery and way of making everything clear – also helps that what he says completely agrees with what the instructor said when I took a class a few weeks ago

    Thanks for posting

    #609735

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #609752

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #609771

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #609800

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    I would say that if you are using it on end grain, the lower angle on your bevel up planes would be a good thing. Conversely, working on figured wood would need a higher total angle to prevent tear out.

    Figured woods like a steeper total angle which is where the “York pitch”, 50 degrees (total), came into existence. Bevel up planes are said to be the best at working at both extremes because of the ability to have different total angles.

    You could have 2 irons for your bevel up, one to give you the low pitch for end grain, and one to give you a high pitch for figured woods. Or, better yet, 2 planes set up with the different angles…

    Sorry, I am spending your money again and you have to save some to buy me that band saw for my birthday….lol.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #609814

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    I would say that if you are using it on end grain, the lower angle on your bevel up planes would be a good thing. Conversely, working on figured wood would need a higher total angle to prevent tear out.

    Figured woods like a steeper total angle which is where the “York pitch”, 50 degrees (total), came into existence. Bevel up planes are said to be the best at working at both extremes because of the ability to have different total angles.

    You could have 2 irons for your bevel up, one to give you the low pitch for end grain, and one to give you a high pitch for figured woods. Or, better yet, 2 planes set up with the different angles…

    Sorry, I am spending your money again and you have to save some to buy me that band saw for my birthday….lol.

    Absolutely right, Jim, and I gotta really get busy saving for that saw. lol

    2 planes makes good sense. 1 for end grain would be my first choice. Figured woods I prefer to do with a card scraper which is kind of the same as a high angle plane.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #609824

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    I would say that if you are using it on end grain, the lower angle on your bevel up planes would be a good thing. Conversely, working on figured wood would need a higher total angle to prevent tear out.

    Figured woods like a steeper total angle which is where the “York pitch”, 50 degrees (total), came into existence. Bevel up planes are said to be the best at working at both extremes because of the ability to have different total angles.

    You could have 2 irons for your bevel up, one to give you the low pitch for end grain, and one to give you a high pitch for figured woods. Or, better yet, 2 planes set up with the different angles…

    Sorry, I am spending your money again and you have to save some to buy me that band saw for my birthday….lol.

    Absolutely right, Jim, and I gotta really get busy saving for that saw. lol

    2 planes makes good sense. 1 for end grain would be my first choice. Figured woods I prefer to do with a card scraper which is kind of the same as a high angle plane.

    That really is where the bevel up bench planes shine – you can swap in blades ground to different angles and pretty much get a whole new plane

    #609826

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Alot of great information here. I am a bit jealous. As I struggle with use of a hand plane and sharpening one. It is one of goals in the future learn more of this.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #609827

    Alot of great information here. I am a bit jealous. As I struggle with use of a hand plane and sharpening one. It is one of goals in the future learn more of this.

    One of the best things about this site is that everyone here is an expert in something, and wants to share. So we all learn about other aspects of the trades, and trade tips to be better in our own

    #609828

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Yes this a great site. I forward to finding time to come on here. It is great to share what we or what were learn. I am hoping one day I might be expert at woodworking.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #609830

    Yes this a great site. I forward to finding time to come on here. It is great to share what we or what were learn. I am hoping one day I might be expert at woodworking.

    A couple of years ago, I thought I was getting close to mastering woodworking. Now Im much better than I was back then, and I am almost a solid medium….

    Seems that as soon as this internet thing took off, being the best around became a lot harder 🙂

    #609836

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    A couple of years ago, I thought I was getting close to mastering woodworking. Now Im much better than I was back then, and I am almost a solid medium….

    Seems that as soon as this internet thing took off, being the best around became a lot harder

    Mastering woodworking is quite a thing, and I don’t think too many people can make that claim no matter how good they are. One thing that I like to do is make sure that every project I do has something I’ve never done before. That keeps my interest more, and keeps expanding my knowledge project by project.

    #609861

    So much to learn, so much to do. I hope to have the skills that I see demonstrated every day. I get by with some things but the road of learning going ahead is longer than the one behind me. I hope I never stop learning.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #609863

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    I certainly am still learning a lot on planes. I don’t have many would like to gather up a few more.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #609864

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    I certainly am still learning a lot on planes. I don’t have many would like to gather up a few more.

    Im mostly trying to figure out if its worth getting something finer than my 6000 grit water stone – it gets a real nice edge, but is never quite honed perfect. I wonder about a strop and honing compound, or a superfine stone

    #609871

    I am always on the lookout to learn more. If you are going to learn, might as well learn from one of the best. This one caught my eye, so I decided to share it.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/6nxKVpVmXGI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    ThanX @jimdaddyo

    Now, will you change your angle to 25* as he explains?
    He makes it look so simple.

    I sharpen all of my planes at 25 degrees. Except for my #5 which I use as a fore plane and sharpen at 30 degrees.

    But….

    Being a fan of Chris Schwarz, I am thinking of going to closer to 35 degrees for my planes….To my logic, the bevel on the iron is only to get the back of the iron out of the way. On a bevel down plane it is the back of the iron that contacts the wood. The bevel comes after the cut is made. As the cutting angle is set by the frog at 45 degrees, what happens after that is less critical, as long as the back of the iron is not contacting the surface. It also stands to reason that the lower angle would hold an edge longer.

    I plan of a video of it when I do my big sharpening session. It is difficult to use water stones when it is below freezing, so my tools get a bit dull over the winter.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/about-my-love-of-35

    It certainly makes sense to use 35º for bevel down planes.
    I have also been looking at 20º instead of 25 for low angle block planes and other bevel up planes. The edge is a bit more delicate but cuts with those planes are almost always very fine.

    I certainly am still learning a lot on planes. I don’t have many would like to gather up a few more.

    Im mostly trying to figure out if its worth getting something finer than my 6000 grit water stone – it gets a real nice edge, but is never quite honed perfect. I wonder about a strop and honing compound, or a superfine stone

    For what it’s worth my finest stone is only 4000 grit. I do use a strop though and I would recommend it. Any kind of buffing compound will work on them, so you don’t have to go far to find it.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #609891

    Picked up a DE (Roebuck house brand before Sears merger) Bailey clone #5-1/2 for $2 last weekend at a local community swap-meet. Finally took a closer look at it today

    Guy selling never could get it to cut well despite it being – in his words – razor sharp. I figured it could either be rehabbed or used for parts

    This is the edge it has. Going to take a grinder or belt sander to fix but the plane itself is perfect other than a broken horn on the tote

    Moral of the story – sometimes it isn’t the fault of the tool

    Attachments:
    #609899

    Picked up a DE (Roebuck house brand before Sears merger) Bailey clone #5-1/2 for $2 last weekend at a local community swap-meet. Finally took a closer look at it today

    Guy selling never could get it to cut well despite it being – in his words – razor sharp. I figured it could either be rehabbed or used for parts

    This is the edge it has. Going to take a grinder or belt sander to fix but the plane itself is perfect other than a broken horn on the tote

    Moral of the story – sometimes it isn’t the fault of the tool

    That’s horrific! Good deal for 2 bucks though. No wonder he didn’t think much of it if that is what he calls sharp as a razor.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #609902

    Picked up a DE (Roebuck house brand before Sears merger) Bailey clone #5-1/2 for $2 last weekend at a local community swap-meet. Finally took a closer look at it today

    Guy selling never could get it to cut well despite it being – in his words – razor sharp. I figured it could either be rehabbed or used for parts

    This is the edge it has. Going to take a grinder or belt sander to fix but the plane itself is perfect other than a broken horn on the tote

    Moral of the story – sometimes it isn’t the fault of the tool

    That’s horrific! Good deal for 2 bucks though. No wonder he didn’t think much of it if that is what he calls sharp as a razor.

    Also explains the full zz-top beard he had. If thats his idea of razor

Viewing 20 posts - 161 through 180 (of 220 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 1.305 seconds