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Going beyond CODE?

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 45 total)
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  • #84903
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    We are trying to be “green” on this build. But lots of times “green” is a feel good issue, not a good sense issue. Actually I am not sure “green” describes what we are building. I have looked briefly at LEAD home design and some of the things they do are just goofy IMO.

    The things we are initially planning to do:
    ICF home (walkout basement and main floor) facing slightly south east
    Radiant heat in the basement and under the tile work on the main floor
    IBC boiler (on demand) for radiant and hot water
    Nu-Air high velocity forced air system
    Thermal solar for preheat of hot water
    Lowen triple pane, argon filled coated windows and doors
    Min north side windows
    3″ Overhang on south side
    Garage on the west side
    Vermont baking soapstone encased woodstove

    Most of these have some sort of payback for us in the short term (under 10 years) as compared to other systems we have looked at based on their efficiencies etc. We did have our inital builder/designer (fired) pushing geothermal, wind power, solar energy, green lumber etc and doing costing, things with a 25 year payback and a 25 year life span don’t make sense to me.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #84907
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    No Mark, my point was that the two are counter to each other. As an engineer I go for strength over saving a couple of 2 x 4’s

    #84931
    Andre_C
    Pro
    Miramichi, New-Brunswick

    All of you guys make a of of sense when you talk about overbuilding. For the DIY bunch of us, code is like jibberish.

    So let’s have your opinion on this one. The house is 29 X 40 (Pic 037). The trusses on the front of this house are 2×4’s. The span on the front trusses(without support) is about 14 ft(pic 551). In the winter there can be quite the load with all the snow we are getting here in New Brunswick, Canada. I don’t need an engineer to tell me that this is not up to code, I know it’s not.

    What’s the best way to approach this problem.

    #85031
    redwood
    Pro

    Trusses are a whole different ball game. I can’t tell if those are trusses or not.

    All true trusses are engineered. They can make those things span rediculous distances, with much smaller lumber.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #85035
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    yup, are trusses are going to be an open truss design of 2×4 lumber. Engineered to span 28 feet (might actually cut that down to 20)

    We built a shed at the farm 60’x120′ Clear span roof all made from 2×4 dimensional lumber

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #85099
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    All of you guys make a of of sense when you talk about overbuilding. For the DIY bunch of us, code is like jibberish.

    So let’s have your opinion on this one. The house is 29 X 40 (Pic 037). The trusses on the front of this house are 2×4′s. The span on the front trusses(without support) is about 14 ft(pic 551). In the winter there can be quite the load with all the snow we are getting here in New Brunswick, Canada. I don’t need an engineer to tell me that this is not up to code, I know it’s not.

    What’s the best way to approach this problem.

    You sure that those are trusses? It is difficult to tell from the picture but it is unusual for trusses to have that big of an area without webbing.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #85104
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    Problem with the codes in my opinion is probably 5 yrs behind cutting edge knowledge either in either the field or lab. Something is discovered, probably takes a year to get published, another year or two for review in the trades and labs, a year or so for public review and incorporation into the code, then another year or so of editing publishing time, then you have to have the jurisdictions adopt the code with some form of comment/notification period. Then it is the official code. By then some of the information may be obsolete.

    #85106
    redwood
    Pro

    Along with Jerry’s thought.

    What’s really problematic is when they change something and word it improperly or are to general in scope and it takes forever to get it fixed.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #85110
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    Or they word it so vaguely and ambiguously that it can’t be reasonably interpreted and enforced.

    #85111
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    Especially when you consider that many of the guys who become inspectors have little if and experience in the trades. An ambiguous code that we can make some sense of probably makes absolutely no sense to the inspector who has never built anything.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #85114
    redwood
    Pro

    On the subject of inspectors. Have you notice that they have less b**s then they used to. Cities are afraid of lawsuits and everything seems to need a stamp now a days.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #85133
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    I think it is related to what Chad said. A lot of inspectors have little or no direct construction knowledge. They don’t know so they require something to cover their behinds. An engineer’s stamp covers it even though it has been previously mentioned, just because somebody is an engineer with a stamp doesn’t mean they know anything.

    #85142
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    its definitely going on here mark.. we have a ton of new young inspectors who dont have a trades background.. about 6 months ago several decks collapsed on a building because they werent bolted to the building.. the ledgers were simply air spiked through the vinyl siding. the city took a ton of heat for this because they passed all the decks on that building when they were redone only a few years ago.

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #85149
    redwood
    Pro

    its definitely going on here mark.. we have a ton of new young inspectors who dont have a trades background.. about 6 months ago several decks collapsed on a building because they werent bolted to the building.. the ledgers were simply air spiked through the vinyl siding. the city took a ton of heat for this because they passed all the decks on that building when they were redone only a few years ago.

    Well the cities should take heat for that. They should take more heat for hiring incompetent inspectors.

    In most cases, building is not rocket science. Man has been doing this for a long time. A competent inspector should know what works and what doesn’t. I don’t care it it’s in the code or not. If it’s something new and they are not sure, go ahead and educate them or steer them in the right direction. But often, it’s nothing new and they still want engineering.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #85196
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    its definitely going on here mark.. we have a ton of new young inspectors who dont have a trades background.. about 6 months ago several decks collapsed on a building because they werent bolted to the building.. the ledgers were simply air spiked through the vinyl siding. the city took a ton of heat for this because they passed all the decks on that building when they were redone only a few years ago.

    Well the cities should take heat for that. They should take more heat for hiring incompetent inspectors.

    In most cases, building is not rocket science. Man has been doing this for a long time. A competent inspector should know what works and what doesn’t. I don’t care it it’s in the code or not. If it’s something new and they are not sure, go ahead and educate them or steer them in the right direction. But often, it’s nothing new and they still want engineering.

    I couldn’t agree more. Inspectors need to to understand building – if they don’t have a basic grasp of the building process there is no way that they can properly perform their job. It’s not happening here, but I have seen that some municipalities towards the Pittsburgh area are getting rid of city employed code officials and re contracting out to private inspection companies.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #85251
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    In my experience the private inspection companies are a joke. They are more interested in collecting their fees thanmmaking sure things are done correctly.

    #85345
    Andre_C
    Pro
    Miramichi, New-Brunswick

    Thanks guys. Brad, my concern is that there was quite a bit of deflection when the roofers where replacing the shingles last fall. It held up three men on the roof but there was some springing. I was thinking of putting a doubled up 2 x 4 running the length of the house and bracing that to the joists. BTW the 2 x 4 are not single pieces, they are all 8-10 ft joined approx in the center of the rafters, hence my concern for the structural integrity of the roof.

    Andre

    #85346

    I think it is related to what Chad said. A lot of inspectors have little or no direct construction knowledge. They don’t know so they require something to cover their behinds. An engineer’s stamp covers it even though it has been previously mentioned, just because somebody is an engineer with a stamp doesn’t mean they know anything.

    On some level though, is this not also related to the public perception of tradesmen? For every bad guy out there (or in this case, every bad inspector), I am HOPEFUL that there is a good one… I know a couple of inspectors who are tradesmen who thought they would be able to provide better for their family via doing inspections, and so started from there

    John S

    #85401
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    In my experience the private inspection companies are a joke. They are more interested in collecting their fees thanmmaking sure things are done correctly.

    I haven’t had much dealing with the private inspection companies yet, I was hoping that they did a decent job but honestly didn’t expect it.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #85402
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    We had a private inspector company do an inspection on our current house. He missed the no insulation on the walls and the 5 broken trusses in the roof.

    We bought the house and found these things out after the fact. Only recourse was we got our $500 back. Not impressed.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

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