dcsimg

Getting Paid for Planning + Estimating

This topic contains 30 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  kurt@welkerhomes.com 1 year, 5 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #651655

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    rob robillard recently did a video segment on just this topic in his contractor advise series, which is part of his concord channel

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #651659

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    A link to the video is posted on the previous page. It is a good informative video.

    #661086

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota
    #661150

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Here is another article on charging for estimates. more good information

    On the same note more and more body shops are going to paid estimates. With insurance companies requiring 3 estimates and with estimates taking upwards of an hour to do right body shops can no longer “afford” to give them out for free.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #661170

    Here is another article on charging for estimates. more good information

    On the same note more and more body shops are going to paid estimates. With insurance companies requiring 3 estimates and with estimates taking upwards of an hour to do right body shops can no longer “afford” to give them out for free.

    Here in Quebec, the insurance companies pay for the estimates if the job goes forward, but not if the car is a write-off or if they go elsewhere. This is officially supposed to keep the body shop honest since the insurance may shop around, and will go with the cheapest quote (which the shop must respect). They also audit the quotes to be sure you aren’t over quoting to get out of a job you don’t want – do that, and lose the business from that insurance provider

    My BIL used to have a shop in a poorer area, and he lost money constantly with having to spend hours on detailed estimates of damage to worthless cars. Pretty much anything past a scratch was a write-off since the paint job was worth more than the 20 year old rusted out junker.

    Now he opened a shop in the rich part of town. Takes a LOT of damage before a $100K car is a write-off, even if the parts are 10X the price.

    #661311

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Time is money and spending time to do a good estimate whether it is for a home remodel or accident damage deserves to be compensated.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #661331

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Here is another article on charging for estimates. more good information

    On the same note more and more body shops are going to paid estimates. With insurance companies requiring 3 estimates and with estimates taking upwards of an hour to do right body shops can no longer “afford” to give them out for free.

    Insurers here tell you which shop to go to for your estimate, only one, and then they decide whether or not to go ahead with repairs.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #661342

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Here in Quebec, the insurance companies pay for the estimates if the job goes forward, but not if the car is a write-off or if they go elsewhere. This is officially supposed to keep the body shop honest since the insurance may shop around, and will go with the cheapest quote (which the shop must respect). They also audit the quotes to be sure you aren’t over quoting to get out of a job you don’t want – do that, and lose the business from that insurance provider

    @montreal_woodworks WTF? Seriously? The insurance company is actually telling the mechanics how to do their job to the point of extortion? (Give me a free estimate….and don’t inflate the price for BS jobs you don’t want or we will never come back?)

    Of course this happens on an individual level, but as an industry policy, it seems to be epically unfair to the mechanics! They are being pitted against each other and made to undercut one another…

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #661361

    Doobie
    Pro

    Insurers here tell you which shop to go to for your estimate, only one, and then they decide whether or not to go ahead with repairs.

    You are allowed to get your work done anywhere. They just don’t want you to and may restrict what they pay out to what their preferred supplier has estimated.

    I had an interesting experience 20 years ago with a house break-in theft claim. The insurance company had their supplier quote thousands less on what MY supplier was quoting on replacing all my computer and printer/copier stuff. At first I thought I was stuck, but then my supplier said to have them quote exactly the brands and componemts of what I had before. Once they did this, their preferred supplier pricing was just shy of my supplier and my supplier had in home setup and support whereas their supplier did not. I was OK to go with my guy. Basically the insurance compamy was trying to replace my Cadillac with Chevy components.

    On that same claim there were two VCRs and a TV which I had all bought at Costco. They sent me to another preferred supplier where even though I told them what I had exactly and pointed out their equivalents or same models to the preferred supplier guy, he had me order much nicer stuff which cost way more. It was just nonsense using their own supplier. The ‘preferred supplier’ was basically ripping off the insurance compamy themselves.

    #667163

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I keep coming back to this thread with things i find as they apply to this topic. A friend of mine who owns a construction company in another part of the state has this as the tag line on all of his emails. I think it sums up business philosophy pretty well.

    “The Common Law of Business Balance is a meditation on price attributed to John Ruskin. It reads as follows:

    It’s unwise to pay too much, but it’s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money — that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot — it can’t be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.”

    #667169

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    some of the best ideas i have seen about charging for estimates. No, Wait, Comprehensive project evaluations. I like that ring and presentation. This is a good read from a JLC update I received. It is getting me a lot closer to revamping my whole process as I read more about this. I think it will get me doing more of the projects I want to do and away from those I do not.

    http://www.jlconline.com/business/estimating-job-costing/charging-for-the-estimate_o?utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=Feature&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JLC_021118%20(1)&he=b10b13606430dce60d4993289987b3020504f62a

Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 0.482 seconds