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GeeFix wall anchor test Video

This topic contains 54 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  58Chev 3 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)
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  • #471583

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    That was a good test. I’m surprised how much it held. I really expected to see the drywall fail before the anchor.

    #471620

    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    So it takes a 1″ hole, what is the actual outside diameter of the plug ? It has some sort of lip, not ? Like others have said it kinda limits where it can be used.

    #471658

    Anonymous

    Thanks both video were fun to watch, I think it wouldn’t be as easy to install with insulation behind the wall. Might be quite cumbersome to shove that big piece in and get it flipped in the proper position, but doable I’m sure.

    #471663

    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    Thanks for the great video Jon! It was nice you were able to get the 12v, Daredevil and a few other Bosch goodies in. The mock setup and weight test was a nice addition.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #471715

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I think that’s plenty to demonstrate it’s not cheapish brittle plastic or of a poor design that can’t handle loads. Good job Jon!

    I’d still like to see how it works for installing it in an exterior wall with vapor barrier poly tight on the other side with insulation. Can it be done without piercing the vapor barrier carefully making a hole using just a hole saw?

    I can certainly try…no promises though! My initial thought is that you’d accidentally poke a hole in the vapor barrier either with the drill bit (spade or the pilot bit on a hole saw) or with the long center screw, no matter how careful you were.

    Thanks both video were fun to watch, I think it wouldn’t be as easy to install with insulation behind the wall. Might be quite cumbersome to shove that big piece in and get it flipped in the proper position, but doable I’m sure.

    Challenge excepted!

    So it takes a 1″ hole, what is the actual outside diameter of the plug ? It has some sort of lip, not ? Like others have said it kinda limits where it can be used.

    I don’t have one in front of me, but I’d say the lip is about 1/8 to 3/16″. It’s certainly not very substantial.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #471779

    Doobie
    Moderator

    I can certainly try…no promises though! My initial thought is that you’d accidentally poke a hole in the vapor barrier either with the drill bit (spade or the pilot bit on a hole saw) or with the long center screw, no matter how careful you were.

    That’s where I figure it requires a trick of sorts. Forget a spade bit, but what about if the hole was started with the center mandrel of a hole saw and once the actual hole saw has penetrate into the drywall enough to have carved out its path but before the mandrel drill bit has pierced the backside, you swap out for a mandrel drill bit that has been shortened for the rest of the journey being careful to not have the hole saw bit punch hard through when clearing the other side. Get what I mean?

    Or am I just going overboard in even trying to find a way to find a way to install such a gizmo in an exterior insulated wall without piercing the vapor barrier?

    Here’s another kookie thought I had in this regard to preserve a vapor barrier. Punch thru the vapor barrier using whatever drill type, but when you go to do the wall fix anchor somehow shoot some low expansion spraycan insulation foam in there first. You’d have enough time to work it’s assembly and installation before it hardens, but it could be a messy undertaking and certain anti gorilla snot precautions should be taken. But once the foam cures, it has likely re-established vapour barrier protection.

    Again, in the grand scheme of things, how important is it to keep the vapor barrier intact in one form or another? I’ve wondered this many times myself.

    #471847

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Doobie wrote:
    I think that’s plenty to demonstrate it’s not cheapish brittle plastic or of a poor design that can’t handle loads. Good job Jon!
    I’d still like to see how it works for installing it in an exterior wall with vapor barrier poly tight on the other side with insulation. Can it be done without piercing the vapor barrier carefully making a hole using just a hole saw?
    I can certainly try…no promises though! My initial thought is that you’d accidentally poke a hole in the vapor barrier either with the drill bit (spade or the pilot bit on a hole saw) or with the long center screw, no matter how careful you were.

    I remember asking this question when the product was first talked about in the original thread.
    My question never got an answer. I don’t think it’s doable without damaging the vapour barrier.
    The length of the piece that goes into the wall would be impossible to push in and get flat on the backside of the wall.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #471862

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    That was a good test. I’m surprised how much it held. I really expected to see the drywall fail before the anchor.

    I kept waiting for it to fall also. Guess the anchor really does spread the load out to keep from breaking through.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #471865

    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Doobie wrote:
    I think that’s plenty to demonstrate it’s not cheapish brittle plastic or of a poor design that can’t handle loads. Good job Jon!
    I’d still like to see how it works for installing it in an exterior wall with vapor barrier poly tight on the other side with insulation. Can it be done without piercing the vapor barrier carefully making a hole using just a hole saw?
    I can certainly try…no promises though! My initial thought is that you’d accidentally poke a hole in the vapor barrier either with the drill bit (spade or the pilot bit on a hole saw) or with the long center screw, no matter how careful you were.

    I remember asking this question when the product was first talked about in the original thread.
    My question never got an answer. I don’t think it’s doable without damaging the vapour barrier.
    The length of the piece that goes into the wall would be impossible to push in and get flat on the backside of the wall.

    You have a good point , it would be interesting to see how they deal with that .

    #471898

    GeeFix
    Pro

    Hi Jon and . all the people on the forum. THis is Gary from GeeFix. Based in England.Thank you for testing the fixings. if there is anything I can advice you on please let me know.regards to you all Gary.

    #472067

    Wonder how it would do on a ceiling for say a hook or to mount track lighting were there is no studs that can be found .

    Always willing to learn .

    #472071

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Hi Jon and . all the people on the forum. THis is Gary from GeeFix. Based in England.Thank you for testing the fixings. if there is anything I can advice you on please let me know.regards to you all Gary.

    @geefix

    Hi Gary, Thanks for stopping by! I really like your anchors..after a couple stress tests, I can say that they are built well and certainly designed to carry a fair amount of weight.

    Do you intend to make a North American version with different screws? Pozi drives aren’t common here…just wondering. Also, how does GeeFix recommend using one of your anchors on a wall with a vapor barrier?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #472072

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Wonder how it would do on a ceiling for say a hook or to mount track lighting were there is no studs that can be found .

    I’m sure they would be more than adequate. I will say though that the packaging recommends using them on 1/2″ material and ceilings are nearly always 5/8″. That said, if you’ve watched the videos I posted, you’ll see that they work just fine on 5/8″ drywall.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #472276

    GeeFix
    Pro

    Regarding the vapour barrier:
    I think Doobie/Kevin is on the right track.
    We used a holesaw and shortened the centre drill bit so that it protruded from the face of the holesaw by about 1/8 of an inch, also we ground off the sharp point of the drill a little.
    Very carefully drill the hole and near the end slow right down and let the holesaw gently cut through the last bit of the sheet. Hopefully the barrier will be intact.
    Using your finger or a piece of dowel, gently push on the poly barrier. Unless the poly is fixed as tight as a drum there should be enough flex to allow you to push the barrier away from the face of the board even if the cavity is filled with rockwool.
    The curved design of the backplate allows you to shoehorn it into the cavity down to approx 1 and 1/4 inches. Gently angle the backplate into the hole while holding onto the pull cord. If needed, you could smear a little lubricant onto the face of the backplate that is in contact with the poly barrier if needed. You can reduce the angle at which the backplate is inserted into the hole by gently cutting a channel for the backplate from the face of the hole to the inner surface. This should reduce the cavity depth required.
    Kevin also suggests using a sealant should the vapour barrier be pierced. This is a good idea. I would suggest that with the backplate inserted and positioned central to the hole, squeeze a little silicon sealant about 1 inch in diameter onto the centre of the curved backplate. When it is tightened the plate flattens onto the inner surface of the sheet and will spread the sealant to seal the hole.
    Gary
    We will be supplying the fixing for the USA and Canadian markets.

    #472300

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    The curved design of the backplate allows you to shoehorn it into the cavity down to approx 1 and 1/4 inches. Gently angle the backplate into the hole while holding onto the pull cord. If needed, you could smear a little lubricant onto the face of the backplate that is in contact with the poly barrier if needed. You can reduce the angle at which the backplate is inserted into the hole by gently cutting a channel for the backplate from the face of the hole to the inner surface. This should reduce the cavity depth required.

    Hi Gary,
    ThanX for the explanation with the use of GeeFix and vapour barrier. I just couldn’t picture it being used without damage to the poly. But as mentioned a bit of silicone would remedy that if needed.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

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