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Future of the Trades

  • This topic has 109 replies, 24 voices, and was last updated 6 years ago by ChadM.
Viewing 20 posts - 81 through 100 (of 110 total)
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  • #57123
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota
    #57147
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    Kurt..great article..I couldnt agree more about him talking about DEBT. I am paying for college now and I know a thing or two about debt. I couldnt agree more even though I am in college…Work hard and smart..great advice

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

    #57167
    svensshutters
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    I was going to start another semester in January, but that will have to wait until summer. I just have too much going on. It’s hard to work, college, family all at the same time, and it’s not for everyone. I just really want to go back so that I can compliment my business, and improve on things, but that will mean dealing with the other unfun topics that have nothing to do with what I got going on. Guess we will see.

    #64514
    ctshannon
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    So what do we do about it?
    Something is better than nothing.

    I’m 31, was pushed into university by my parents, graduated, and started my carpentry apprenticeship right after. I now run a small, very small, ( 1-2 young employees) finishing company and I have more than 3 times the amount of work I can handle. And the money is well over 100k.

    I use this information to tell young people what the trades are all about and the great life that can be had when you are one. Since I’m fairly young myself, I am exposed to 20 year olds through younger siblings, family friends etc and constantly push the trades route to any who are sceptical of the university route.
    I have spent time learning all of the ins and outs of how to get into apprenticeships so that I can quickly and clearly map out a route for a young person to suceed in the trades within 5 minutes.

    I feel like school boards should be seeking trade reps that kids could relate to ( ie. not 50 years old….sorry guys) to come into schools and preach trades.

    The mindset has to change. Too many people have the idea that you go into trades only if you cannot get into a good university. I could not disagree with that mentality more.

    It’s up to us.

    #209335

    I love this topic! Even after almost a year of no action on this thread, the future of the trades is still a widely concerning issue. I believe that high school students are pushed into the college system and the trades jobs and opportunities are neglected. This is exactly why we are organizing an event – Touch A Truck Wisconsin to introduce kids and families to the construction and trades industry and to raise awareness that there are many rewarding opportunities in the construction industry. You can learn more about it at http://www.touchatruckwisconsin.com/home.html

    College degrees are not for everyone – AND THAT’S OK! We will always needs tradesmen to continue to ‘Build America’. At our company, we currently see a lack of younger employees wanting to learn about a trade. We employ laborers that are under 25, however they are completely satisfied just doing their work without learning anything new.

    #209391
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    We employ laborers that are under 25, however they are completely satisfied just doing their work without learning anything new.

    That’s not good. People always need to take advantage of their current situation to learn as much as possible to see if it leads to advancement. I study automotive history as a hobby. You would be amazed at the amount of people that were captains of the automotive industry, started car companies, were extremely successful that only had a HS education or never finished school at all. They started out in the trades and worked hard learning as they went demonstrating their ability to master their craft and lead men and were successful.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #209463

    I know lots of the experienced guys here do not think my generation is willing to work hard (and experience it), but I am willing to bet there are plenty of young guys out there who ARE willing to work hard… the challenge is that they are working hard behind a desk after college rather than working hard physically. I understand that there is a huge difference between physical labor and desk work… please do not get me wrong there… I have a huge amount of respect for how you guys bust your butt. But I am willing to bet hard workers in the white collar world COULD be hard workers in the blue collar world. You just have to win them over young.

    Some of the guys I know who went into the trades out of high school did not do it out of a passion or on their own, but as a sort of ‘last-resort’ – because they were not able to qualify for anything else. It seems like it would be good for the future of the trades to attract and win over eager young guys with great potential somehow

    John S

    #209500

    I love this topic! Even after almost a year of no action on this thread, the future of the trades is still a widely concerning issue. I believe that high school students are pushed into the college system and the trades jobs and opportunities are neglected. This is exactly why we are organizing an event – Touch A Truck Wisconsin to introduce kids and families to the construction and trades industry and to raise awareness that there are many rewarding opportunities in the construction industry. You can learn more about it at http://www.touchatruckwisconsin.com/home.html

    College degrees are not for everyone – AND THAT’S OK! We will always needs tradesmen to continue to ‘Build America’. At our company, we currently see a lack of younger employees wanting to learn about a trade. We employ laborers that are under 25, however they are completely satisfied just doing their work without learning anything new.

    At age 25 most people still are trying to find themselves . Let alone think about the next 30 years . Still tryin to step out of the college days .

    Always willing to learn .

    #209506
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    It would help a lot if high schools were still teaching trades . Too many of them gave up on teaching trades for safety reasons . It also doesn’t help when a framers wages basically stay the same over a 20 year period .

    #209569
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    The problem is that the building trades, factory work, welding, auto mechanics, etc has a stigma of being dead end jobs that only attract alcoholics, drug users, and ex-cons. It’s true that the trades have its fair share of these but so does Wall Street. Kids coming out of high school have had four years of their parents, teachers, and school counselors pounding into their head that if they want to make it in life they HAVE to go to college. What the trades need to do as a whole is get the message out to HS aged kids that there is money to be made here, that swinging a hammer, turning a wrench, laying a weld, and other skilled trades can be a career not just an interim job while they figure out what they really want to do with their life.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #209577
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    The problem is that the building trades, factory work, welding, auto mechanics, etc has a stigma of being dead end jobs that only attract alcoholics, drug users, and ex-cons. It’s true that the trades have its fair share of these but so does Wall Street. Kids coming out of high school have had four years of their parents, teachers, and school counselors pounding into their head that if they want to make it in life they HAVE to go to college. What the trades need to do as a whole is get the message out to HS aged kids that there is money to be made here, that swinging a hammer, turning a wrench, laying a weld, and other skilled trades can be a career not just an interim job while they figure out what they really want to do with their life.

    Well that certainly explains a few of my bad habits 🙂

    #209583
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Well that certainly explains a few of my bad habits

    I have worked with several pretty nice beer pounding, drug using ex-cons! Heck, there was a time…….

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #209593
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Well that certainly explains a few of my bad habits

    I have worked several pretty nice beer pounding, drug using ex-cons! Heck, there was a time…….

    It seemed like the thing to do back when I started out .Work hard play hard 🙂

    #209683

    Chad, lol, the things that don’t need said about the old days.

    If common core were implemented as it was said to be , there would be a big push on the trades. Truth is, local high school teacher caught havoc for finding a couple of his students jobs. Parents called in and complained because it would cut money off their monthly check. Seems that in 1975 or so , folks realized that not all of us learned the same way. So testing began, then in 1976 the special education classrooms began (know that I am close but date may be slightly off). So they put kids in rooms and since they didn’t have answers they started giving out Social Security checks to help with tutoring. Since that time, schools have become responsible for materials, teachers …., yet many kids still get a check. You may not believe this, (sarcasm intended) but there is no need to account for the check. Therefore the money can be spent for tutors, educational game, crack or whatever else you can imagine. Some of the Technical schools have great programs.

    #210987

    @ChadM – Spot on!



    @cranbrook2
    Are fewer and fewer schools teaching trades? At our local high school, they do teach some trades. I think if they reached out to some local contractors, they could partner together to get students more interested in trades.

    #210993
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    @ChadM – Spot on!

    @cranbrook2 Are fewer and fewer schools teaching trades? At our local high school, they do teach some trades. I think if they reached out to some local contractors, they could partner together to get students more interested in trades.

    A lot of the high schools have got rid of shop classes around here .There are still a few and I get a lot of high school students that are interested in woodworking when they see my work . Last year I had students from 5 schools come here for a tour of my place .A few of the schools are now teaching their students how to build birdhouses from my plans .

    http://www.bwdsb.on.ca/bwdsb_Archives/I0606AA4C

    #211030

    I honestly did not know of any sort of shop classes when I was in high school less than a decade ago – not in my district at least, either in KC or the burbs in Chicago… I have seen some schools create magnet programs that specialize in something, but it is more like “chef school” than anything in the trades

    John S

    #211044

    Supply and demand will sort some of the issue with people entering the trades. Wage rates will go up and become even more competitive with jobs requiring a college degree drawing more interest in the trades. What I worry about is the resulting level of skill. There may be such demand for labor that experience and skill expectations will be downgraded. We will all be paying top shelf prices and getting bottom barrel value.

    #225211
    jstare
    Pro
    Langley, BC

    I find in my area that there is starting to become less trades workers, but I know over recent years there has also been an excess in workers and small companies coming in and undercutting experienced companies to steal work which has been bad for a lot of reputable companies.

    I have noticed a change in the culture of trades, it actually seems more young kids are being pushed into trades in high school. When I was in school I was told that University was the only way to go and that trades were a waste of time. Now I have friends that went to University and still haven’t used their degrees and I am 10 years out of school.

    #225322

    States that have adopted Common Core now have to talk about career reediness, not strictly college

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