dcsimg

French Polish

Viewing 9 posts - 21 through 29 (of 29 total)
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  • #486677

    Never tried it before but have read about it. It is a lot of work and I am sure it takes some time to master. But the end results are great. @r-ice, hope you can post how it goes for you when you start.

    #486685
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I think that medical grade isopropyl alcohol is about 77%. You can get 99% at livestock supply places like TSC, and likely cheaper there too.

    I have some alcohol in a mason jar I got from some good ole boys down South that I bet would work. It’s more of the sippin type so it would make your polishing more enjoyable 😉

    #486686
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I think that medical grade isopropyl alcohol is about 77%. You can get 99% at livestock supply places like TSC, and likely cheaper there too.

    I have some alcohol in a mason jar I got from some good ole boys down South that I bet would work. It’s more of the sippin type so it would make your polishing more enjoyable 😉

    If it will catch fire, it’s probably good….lol.

    One thing about FP is that it is very forgiving. Mistakes are easy to correct. Due in part that one layer literally melts into the other. If you get a blob or run, let it dry, wet sand it out with oil as a lube, and build from there.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #486745
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I think that medical grade isopropyl alcohol is about 77%. You can get 99% at livestock supply places like TSC, and likely cheaper there too.

    I have some alcohol in a mason jar I got from some good ole boys down South that I bet would work. It’s more of the sippin type so it would make your polishing more enjoyable 😉

    If it will catch fire, it’s probably good….lol.

    One thing about FP is that it is very forgiving. Mistakes are easy to correct. Due in part that one layer literally melts into the other. If you get a blob or run, let it dry, wet sand it out with oil as a lube, and build from there.

    When you say wet sand it out you mean with a high grit wet sandpaper and oil?

    #486848
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I think that medical grade isopropyl alcohol is about 77%. You can get 99% at livestock supply places like TSC, and likely cheaper there too.

    I have some alcohol in a mason jar I got from some good ole boys down South that I bet would work. It’s more of the sippin type so it would make your polishing more enjoyable 😉

    If it will catch fire, it’s probably good….lol.

    One thing about FP is that it is very forgiving. Mistakes are easy to correct. Due in part that one layer literally melts into the other. If you get a blob or run, let it dry, wet sand it out with oil as a lube, and build from there.

    When you say wet sand it out you mean with a high grit wet sandpaper and oil?

    Yes. Use the same oil as you are using for the FP procedure. 400 or 600 grit depending on what you have on hand. The polishing procedure will fill in any sanding scratches you will get.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #486862
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    This is basically the same process as lacquering from what I can gather. I’ll spray multiple coats of lacquer and then sand it out with 600g and soapy water. More coats of lacquer, then sand at 1000g. Even more lacquer and finally sand and buff to at least 2000g.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #486949
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    This is basically the same process as lacquering from what I can gather. I’ll spray multiple coats of lacquer and then sand it out with 600g and soapy water. More coats of lacquer, then sand at 1000g. Even more lacquer and finally sand and buff to at least 2000g.

    FP melts into the previous layer exactly like lacquer does. You don’t need to sand it though unless you made a mistake, or are levelling a surface. Less fumes too, but takes a lot longer.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #487224
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    This is basically the same process as lacquering from what I can gather. I’ll spray multiple coats of lacquer and then sand it out with 600g and soapy water. More coats of lacquer, then sand at 1000g. Even more lacquer and finally sand and buff to at least 2000g.

    FP melts into the previous layer exactly like lacquer does. You don’t need to sand it though unless you made a mistake, or are levelling a surface. Less fumes too, but takes a lot longer.

    for me i think for higher priced items, i’ll be willing do this and spend the time to make it super polished but for things that get more touching, i’d rather be doing a regular finish

    #513472

    I’ve seen this in articles but have never tried it. Looks like a great finish.

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