dcsimg

Framing nails vs screws

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 118 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #407259
    monman1
    Pro

    For regular joist hangers on 3 ply or more beam it gets 3 1/4 12d nails, but a 2 ply beam its get the 1 1/2 10d hanger nails.

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #407260
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    If you use the 1.5″ nails, instead of the exact nails specified in the Simpson or USP catalog, you have to reduce the carrying capacity of the hanger by 25% from that specified in the catalog. You can not use the 1.5′ nails for the slant nail hangers. If we only have a few hangers to install, we use the
    Simpson or USP screws, otherwise we use the Paslode positive placement gun with the 1 .5″ or 2.5″ hails depending on what is required. Both Simpson and USP allow the screws as a replacement for the same length nails in their hangers. Code officials or plans examiners should also.

    Great point. I don’t believe I’ve ever needed more than the 1 1/2″ size. I don’t use too many hangers, so I haven’t come across the need for longer screws.

    How do you know what size to use? Does it depend upon the depth of what the hanger/hardware is mounted to? If so, I don’t believe I’ve hung one on anything more than a 2x thickness.

    you can look them up online or download the catalog here. http://www.strongtie.com/ you need to determine your loads, msize the hanger then follow the nailing instructions. So often people just grab a hanger for a 2 x 10 but they make over a dozen 2 x 10 hangers allmwith different capacities. Our building official requires hangers to be sized on the plan for everything and a nailing scheduled to be included also.

    #407339
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    So often people just grab a hanger for a 2 x 10 but they make over a dozen 2 x 10 hangers allmwith different capacities.

    Yep best to go with what the manufacturer recommends based on the specs.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #407479
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    For regular joist hangers on 3 ply or more beam it gets 3 1/4 12d nails, but a 2 ply beam its get the 1 1/2 10d hanger nails.

    Depending on the loading that may not be adequate, it is best to follow the book. The only 1 .5″ nails we use are the side nails on a hanger or when going into a single ply. I have also seen notes to use 10p nails and clinch on single plys. The 1.5″ teco is not always the answer.

    #407501
    monman1
    Pro

    For regular joist hangers on 3 ply or more beam it gets 3 1/4 12d nails, but a 2 ply beam its get the 1 1/2 10d hanger nails.

    Depending on the loading that may not be adequate, it is best to follow the book. The only 1 .5″ nails we use are the side nails on a hanger or when going into a single ply. I have also seen notes to use 10p nails and clinch on single plys. The 1.5″ teco is not always the answer.

    Thats for floor joists and ceiling joists.

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #407524
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    I learned a very valuable lesson in my early years in framing, thankfully while working for someone else. We were framing a small 2 story hotel. There were balconies on the front and back. We used 8 penny nails to install the hangers. The inspector said no go and we had to pull every nail and replace them with the correct ones. I can say that was probably the last time I used the wrong nails…lol!

    oh that sucks. thats some work for the new guy in the group lol or for the apprentice

    Oh no…everyone in the crew got in on that one! It was only right. Still sucked pulling all those nails…and then of course installing the new longer, larger nails.

    i can imagine that

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Instagram
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Palm Springs, CA

    #408929
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    On this one house the stairs to the basement were screwed in place with deck screws. Two guys were walking down and the screws sheared off. Both fell and were knocked out for a moment.

    So now I nail stairs off. Temp or not.

    #408932
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    On this one house the stairs to the basement were screwed in place with deck screws. Two guys were walking down and the screws sheared off. Both fell and were knocked out for a moment.

    So now I nail stairs off. Temp or not.

    wow thats bad.

    yeah i wish to have a framing gun. i build a chicken coop just out of screws.
    would be much faster with nails and cheaper too

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Instagram
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Palm Springs, CA

    #409224
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    On this one house the stairs to the basement were screwed in place with deck screws. Two guys were walking down and the screws sheared off.

    Wow never would of guess that would of happened. I guess deck screws have very little shear strength.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #409268
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    On this one house the stairs to the basement were screwed in place with deck screws. Two guys were walking down and the screws sheared off.

    Wow never would of guess that would of happened. I guess deck screws have very little shear strength.

    That’s a surprise to me too. Any idea how many screws were used?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #409270
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    On this one house the stairs to the basement were screwed in place with deck screws. Two guys were walking down and the screws sheared off.

    Wow never would of guess that would of happened. I guess deck screws have very little shear strength.

    That’s a surprise to me too. Any idea how many screws were used?

    2 per board and the thinnest screws you can get ?! 😀

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Instagram
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Palm Springs, CA

    #409324
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The 1.5″ teco is not always the answer.

    Isn’t that why they have 2½” tico nails? We must use tico in all metal.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #409327
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    On this one house the stairs to the basement were screwed in place with deck screws. Two guys were walking down and the screws sheared off.

    Wow never would of guess that would of happened. I guess deck screws have very little shear strength.

    That’s a surprise to me too. Any idea how many screws were used?

    IIRC 3 #8 on the top riser. They are not great in shear applications.

    Plain plywood no PT involved.

    #409363
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Plain plywood no PT involved.

    What? Can you get some pictures of this? I’ve got a weak spot for sh!tty construction pics…

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #409622
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    @jponto07
    Sorry no pics.

    The GC was pretty anal about cameras onsite. Daahh

    Just imagine 3 headless screws in a 2x, And me rushing over to do first aid ( former RN ). The rest of the crew were slack jawed and my shout to call 911 was over ruled, I found out about 15 minutes later.

    Since then I have worked else were.

    #409756
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Sorry no pics.

    The GC was pretty anal about cameras onsite. Daahh

    Just imagine 3 headless screws in a 2x, And me rushing over to do first aid ( former RN ). The rest of the crew were slack jawed and my shout to call 911 was over ruled, I found out about 15 minutes later.

    Since then I have worked else were.

    It’s becoming clear why he had a problem with cameras on site…he’s a hack.

    Who in their right mind over rules a 911 call unless they are scared of being busted for negligence? I’m glad you aren’t working there anymore…if GC doesn’t protect his guys from stupid injuries, who will?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #410504
    burr251
    Pro

    Not a framer but as far as I know and thought was widely accepted is that screws in general were too brittle for any load bearing applications. I guess I could see why you’d use em for something temporary but other than that they’re called “drywall” or “deck” screws bc that’s what they’re for. Haven’t ever seen any “framing” screws. Just structural screws but I thought they were usually used when specked for. Not general framing.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    #410638
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Not a framer but as far as I know and thought was widely accepted is that screws in general were too brittle for any load bearing applications.

    Makes sense nails will bend while a screw just snaps off.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #410654
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Not a framer but as far as I know and thought was widely accepted is that screws in general were too brittle for any load bearing applications.

    Makes sense nails will bend while a screw just snaps off.

    however what about structural screws than?

    #410746

    Not a framer but as far as I know and thought was widely accepted is that screws in general were too brittle for any load bearing applications.

    Makes sense nails will bend while a screw just snaps off.

    however what about structural screws than?

    As good as nails (or so I am told) but about 0.50-$1 per, so way way more expensive than nails.

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 118 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
queries. 0.510 seconds