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FRAMING NAILERS\M/Coil or stick?

This topic contains 78 replies, has 32 voices, and was last updated by  jkirk 21 hours, 56 minutes ago.

Viewing 19 posts - 61 through 79 (of 79 total)
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  • #716735

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Every type of nailers has different uses. One can’t do the job of others. To know more about the coil and stick nailer you can read this post . This will help you a lot to decide which one actually you should like and when.

    Gee you’re a tool geek with a review site,,
    @chadm

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #716879

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Every type of nailers has different uses. One can’t do the job of others. To know more about the coil and stick nailer you can read this post . This will help you a lot to decide which one actually you should like and when.

    Gee you’re a tool geek with a review site,,
    @chadm

    Think Chad has missed this one.

    Like you’ve been saying recently though Dirty, sure is a lot of spammers lately. You can tell none of them read the forum FAQ/Rules. They just join and spam away.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #716881

    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    Think Chad has missed this one

    I finally got him lol… Sent to spamville.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #716883

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I actually just read thru this old thread that has been dug out of its hibernation by the aforementioned spammer in the recently made previous posts. Interesting little education for me in regards to coil versus stick framers I never realized til now. Generally what I’m reading is that stick mailers are significantly heavier than coil nailers, but offer less shots available between needing to be reloaded. Myself I don’t really think I care much about the reloading frequency, but the weight differential is another matter I am now concerned about.

    I didn’t realize that most prefer stick nailers over coil nailers wherever possible. I have a roofing Senco coil nailer that is like 30 years old that I bought second hand that still works like a champ but does get the odd jam. I just make sure I have a pair of pliers with me when I’m up on a roof working with it and most times I can detect that a nail is jamming and not to fire off further nails and with just the pliers I can usually un-jam it pretty quick and get it going again without having to get off the roof to deal with. It’s not a heavy nailer to handle and for the amount of further roofing I see in my future, I don’t plan on replacing it.

    But the other coil nailer I have is a 20 year old Bostitch I bought refurbed at HD back then that I seldom need/use, and it is heavy. It has seen some decent action in the last few years building new structures outside in my backyard and will see some more in the next year or so building other things I have slated.

    One of the things I did almost immediately after getting the Bostitch was remove the sequential firing mechanism/trigger and set it to single shot. Scarred the crap out of me the first time I went to try it 20 years ago and didn’t know it was set to sequential and went and tapped three nails in instead of one in the blink of an eye. Reading back in this thread, it sounds like for safety reasons, most don’t have these guns set to sequential firing anyways. So I’m not a ‘Girlie-Man’ in this regard. (I’ve been unnecessarily living in shame for all these years….sigh. Lol!)

    But I have seen some deals on stick framers recently in my travels and just never bothered to really investigate whether I should opt for one myself. Lowes up here are clearing out a lot of Hitachi the last few months. Is there a model that is primo in the Hitachi lineup and others that should be avoided when it comes to stick framing nailers?

    What about other brands and models out there? Hearing about how the stick models are significantly lighter is making me give this a look. I’ve got a wrist/thumb that is getting finicky the last few years as I get older, and maybe I should opt for a stick model if I can find one at a decent price. I just don’t know which models are to be avoided and not buy some discounted model that is only on discount because it is simply a POS to begin with and they are trying to get rid of for that reason alone versus a good price on a tried and true model.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #716908

    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    maybe I should opt for a stick model if I can find one at a decent price

    Not 100% sure on this but I think you can swap out the coil drum with a stick mag for a fraction of the cost of a new gun. You’d have to do some research on that with your model #

    #716909

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    maybe I should opt for a stick model if I can find one at a decent price

    Not 100% sure on this but I think you can swap out the coil drum with a stick mag for a fraction of the cost of a new gun. You’d have to do some research on that with your model #

    Didn’t know that was a possibily. Gotta wonder if that’s possible at all even if you coulda years ago but now my model is so old you no longer can.

    I actually think most of the weight is because of the huge hellium ballon shaped solid metal head of the unit. It’s basically almost cantaloupe in size. The mag that holds the coils is mostly plastic. It’s a good quality plastic, but it is thick bodied as well. The rest is all metal. I’ve dropped it and kicked it around plemty it is so tank like built.

    The only service I had to do was get the O rings replaced for $40 a few years ago. It has rarely ever jammed on me and it was more user error when it did. The feeder and its heavy duty flip open cover are extremely well designed and shuts true and accurate still.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #716910

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Hitachi or should I say Matabo HPT is a good light stick gun. Paslode and Bostich are heavy.

    I don’t think you can just swap out the magazines due to the coli advancement on a coil gun.

    Production guys like the coils because you get 300 nails in a load instead of the 60 in a stick gun. 5 times the anils between reloading.

    Off the shelf the coil guns are lighter I believe but when you add 300 nails to that verses 60 in a stick gun and the coil becomes heavier.

    If you are looking for a good light Stick gun, look for an aluminum head and magazine to save weight.

    #716911

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Now what about the nails themselves. Isn’t the head on sticks a clipped head? With the coils mine I use are of course round head with ardox spiral twist shafts. With stick nailers, am I sacrificing weaker hold power of the nails?

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #716914

    CB
    Pro

    Now what about the nails themselves. Isn’t the head on sticks a clipped head? With the coils mine I use are of course round head with ardox spiral twist shafts. With stick nailers, am I sacrificing weaker hold power of the nails?

    Full Round Head Stick Nailer

    #716916

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Now what about the nails themselves. Isn’t the head on sticks a clipped head? With the coils mine I use are of course round head with ardox spiral twist shafts. With stick nailers, am I sacrificing weaker hold power of the nails?

    The 21 degree plastic collated stick nailer will have a full head. You can also get the 30 – 34 degree wire or paper collated with a full offset head. The head only matters on sheeting in reality. In 2x framing situations, the pull out of the shank on the nail is greater than the pull through of the head.

    #716917

    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I don’t think you can just swap out the magazines due to the coli advancement on a coil gun.

    I would guess if the coil and stick guns use the same body, the stick mag with correct feeder would be a simple swap of the drum and feeder. That’s why I said some research would be needed…. or am I missing something ?

    Don’t really matter…… we all know Doobies gunna buy a new gun anyway

    #716934

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    it sounds like for safety reasons, most don’t have these guns set to sequential firing anyways. So I’m not a ‘Girlie-Man’ in this regard.

    I keep all my guns on sequential firing. My new 18volt Hitachi framer has a sequential firing mode. All my old guns are sequential firing only.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #716986

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    it sounds like for safety reasons, most don’t have these guns set to sequential firing anyways. So I’m not a ‘Girlie-Man’ in this regard.

    I keep all my guns on sequential firing. My new 18volt Hitachi framer has a sequential firing mode. All my old guns are sequential firing only.

    Several years ago I bought a cheap stick framing nailer to make like easier while building a deck and other jobs I had to do at our trailer. I had friend from the trailer park who is a contractor help build my deck. When he used my nail gun and found out it was on sequential fire he would use it anymore.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #716995

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    it sounds like for safety reasons, most don’t have these guns set to sequential firing anyways. So I’m not a ‘Girlie-Man’ in this regard.

    I keep all my guns on sequential firing. My new 18volt Hitachi framer has a sequential firing mode. All my old guns are sequential firing only.

    Several years ago I bought a cheap stick framing nailer to make like easier while building a deck and other jobs I had to do at our trailer. I had friend from the trailer park who is a contractor help build my deck. When he used my nail gun and found out it was on sequential fire he would use it anymore.

    We run everything on bump fire the guys can’t stand the single fire. I think most contractors run them that way.

    #716997

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    My earliest experience with pneumatic nailers was in bump fire mode. I was told at the time that I didn’t want to waste my time with single fire. Didn’t take long to get accustomed to it and I have never bothered with single fire since. I do understand why DIYers are directed to single fire though. There is just so much chance of self harm for the inexperienced or careless user.

    I borrowed a stapler to put up vapour barrier in a home and got an upholstery model. Firing was continuous and the firing rate could be varied. Place the gun on the work, pull the trigger and move the gun along the stud. What a treat that was to use.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought stupid than to open your mouth and remove all traces of doubt.

    #717004

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    it sounds like for safety reasons, most don’t have these guns set to sequential firing anyways. So I’m not a ‘Girlie-Man’ in this regard.

    I keep all my guns on sequential firing. My new 18volt Hitachi framer has a sequential firing mode. All my old guns are sequential firing only.

    Several years ago I bought a cheap stick framing nailer to make like easier while building a deck and other jobs I had to do at our trailer. I had friend from the trailer park who is a contractor help build my deck. When he used my nail gun and found out it was on sequential fire he would use it anymore.

    We run everything on bump fire the guys can’t stand the single fire. I think most contractors run them that way.

    My earliest experience with pneumatic nailers was in bump fire mode. I was told at the time that I didn’t want to waste my time with single fire. Didn’t take long to get accustomed to it and I have never bothered with single fire since.

    OK….nuff said…Doobie is a “Girlie-Man”. 🙁

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #717007

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    My earliest experience with pneumatic nailers was in bump fire mode. I was told at the time that I didn’t want to waste my time with single fire. Didn’t take long to get accustomed to it and I have never bothered with single fire since. I do understand why DIYers are directed to single fire though. There is just so much chance of self harm for the inexperienced or careless user.

    I borrowed a stapler to put up vapour barrier in a home and got an upholstery model. Firing was continuous and the firing rate could be varied. Place the gun on the work, pull the trigger and move the gun along the stud. What a treat that was to use.

    we have a Duo Fast Stapler that is like that, It has a dial on it that varies the rate of fire. Man can it go through a clip of staples. It is great for house wrap and interior poly.

    #717023

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    There is a skill to the bump fire mode on the guns. I have a makita 18ga. that is only single fire 🙁 not sure what I’ll do with it.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #717039

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    ive pretty much always used a stick nailer, my old company had a coil framer that we we sometimes used for sheathing however it was problematic for the depth the nails would be set.. often sinking them too far and the gun didnt have a built in depth adjust… dialing down the compressor would compromise stick nailers that were also plugged in

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

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