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Framing Energy Efficient Corners

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  • #7487

    How do you guys frame your corners? Solid vs open pocket?

    It seems that that many framers these days have changed the way they frame their corners – how do you frame yours???

    ~ Rob at http://www.ConcordCarpenter.com

    #8962
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    for us it really depends on what the floor layout is above along with the roof line in conjuction with the type of siding and exterior trim detail.

    most of the homes we build or remodel are loaded with large window headers and beams which requires large posts some of which land in corners which means solid corners. some times we can get away with a boxed in corner but we pack it with rigid foam first so there is some insulation in there and since its foam it wont take on water during the construction period

    also, more often than not the siding we install is lap siding that gets a 2x corner board detail. this requires solid nailing for the rain screen so we have solid nailing for the furring strip to be wide enough to catch both the corner board and edge of the siding.. we frame these corners as a U stud. it provides solid nailing on both sides and still leaves a cavity for the insulator to fit fibreglass into. if its framed as just a l stud the corner board will bounce around and can pull away over time

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #9248
    mark
    Pro
    Jackson, TN

    We always frame solid corners for the strength and rigidity.

    #9251

    I like the pocket detail which is the same as the “U” stud. Its easy to insulate:http://www.aconcordcarpenter.com/2012/11/framing-energy-efficient-corners.html

    ~ Rob at http://www.ConcordCarpenter.com

    #9258
    mark
    Pro
    Jackson, TN

    Good article. I didn’t realize the R-value gain would be of any significance with a U-stud.

    #11434
    goldss
    Pro

    Seems in my experience pre-fab wall components have always used the pocket corner.It’s been my preference even stick framing my walls built by my crew.

    #11599
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I’ve used the pocket detail before and found it worked well especially when it came time to insulate. Anywhere you can gain some extra R-value you might as well…home heating isn’t getting any cheaper.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #11629
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    if a u stud is used. you can still get r-12 in there by using one layer of 1″ foam and one layer of 1 1/2″
    as opposed using fibreglass which will do nothing in 2 1/2″ inches

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #11658

    I posted this because I’ve ran into alot of solid corners on new frames and was suprised to see them. The U Stud make way more sense to me.

    ~ Rob at http://www.ConcordCarpenter.com

    #11678

    We insulate all headers and corners. It makes good sense especially when you calculate how over-designed framing has become.

    #11682

    Always solid corners for the strength !

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    #11687
    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    I always use pocket corners and always try to frame all exterior walls with 2 by 6’s 24 on center. We once even framed a house with 2 by 8’s. In the long run it makes sense for the home owner. More money up front, however decreased energy bills forever.

    #11707
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    2×8 walls are typically called for on ‘tall walls’ where the studs have to be 14′ continous or longer to create great rooms.. their needed to resist deflection under high winds.. ive done several of them but they werent with conventional lumber, the specs called for either timberstrand studs or lvl studs

    you are right though about the added insulation you can upgrade to r-29

    as for 24″ o.c studs for an exterior wall. i dont know how thats possible as to provide proper bearing strength for floor joists above.. typical flor systems are either 16″.o.c or 19 ” o.c when you start going bigger with stud spacings the joists have to be point loaded over studs. if you have 24″ o.c joists the plywood floor sheathing will sag

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #11708
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I have never seen 24″ o.c on exterior walls either especially if there is more than 1 floor .Usually we add a row of solid blocking halfway in the wall to help support the upper floors .

    #11732
    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    We go 24 on Ranches only, But I do have a friend that goes 24 on everything. He has never had an issue with deflection. As far as point loads, every build, the joists line up on top of studs, it makes things easier for all subs and is just a better way to set things up in my opinion.

    #37071
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Advanced framing techniques really push 24″ o/c spacing on walls and floors. 3/4″OSB is typically rated at 24″ spacing. You can also upgrade to 1 1/8″ subfloors. While not recommended for ceramic tile, it all does meet code. They also recomend 2 stud corners and drywall clips. I like the “U” to allow solid nailing of siding and siding corners. Unless there is a large header bearing on a corner, 2 studs at that point meet or exceed code. A channel corner, far exceeds code. Solid corners are overkill and reduce insulation values of a wall.
    The one issue is that most siding requires solid attachment at 16″ o/c

    #37073
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Advanced framing techniques really push 24″ o/c spacing on walls and floors. 3/4″OSB is typically rated at 24″ spacing. You can also upgrade to 1 1/8″ subfloors. 3/4″, While not recommended for ceramic tile, it all does meet code. They also recomend 2 stud corners and drywall clips.

    I like the “U” to allow solid nailing of siding and siding corners. Unless there is a large header bearing on a corner, 2 studs at that point meet or exceed code. A channel corner, far exceeds code. Solid corners are overkill and reduce insulation values of a wall.
    The one issue is that most siding requires solid attachment at 16″ o/c

    #37107
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    floor`s that are framed 24″ o.c joists are really bouncy though it really pushes the limits of the plywood. i would never do it.. 19 3/16 is bad enough at times

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #37234
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    While we tipically frame floors ar 19.2, sheeting is well within it’s limits. We do see a lot of floors designed improperly with to great of a span for the spacing and joist size.

    Designed properly paying attention to deflection limits, 24″ o/c floors can be desigmed qiute stiff. Most designers are designing to maximum deflection and thus the bounce. Reducing the allowable deflection to less than the code maximun will greatly stiffen a floor.

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