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Flat Or Nested? Coped Or Mitered?

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 46 total)
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  • #166177
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    How do you cut your crown molding, Flat Or Nested?
    I always go with nested mostly because I don’t have a sliding miter saw. I nest it in my big chop saw and hack away. It comes out looking good and I don’t even know it I would know how to handle the 22½º cuts to go around the bullnose drywall if I have to cut it flat?
    On your inside corners do you cope em in or miter the cuts? I like to cope em in. I use the jiggy and tune them in with a grinder.

    #166189
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Nested. Takes to much time to do it flat.
    I will try mitering an inside first. But most get coped. Someday I’m gonna try a grinder.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #166191
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Nested. Takes to much time to do it flat.
    I will try mitering an inside first. But most get coped. Someday I’m gonna try a grinder.

    I love the grinder with a 30 or 40 grit on the rubber wheel. It works great. I like the jiggsaw to get rid of the bulk because it’s MDF and stinks, the grinder takes it right down but too big of a cloud of MDF.

    #166192
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Nested and coped.

    #166199

    I have done both. I think nested is a bit quicker for anything under 5-1/4. Cope 90 degree corners. Off angle gets miter guage to determine angle. I like the sanding disc idea in the grinder.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #166200
    redwood
    Pro

    Nested and coped, never use MDF for crown molding.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #166204
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I cut my crown nested and I cope my inside corners. I still cope the old fashioned way with a coping saw and a file and sandpaper to fine tune.

    To cut your 22.5 for the bullnose with the crown laying flat you would need a 14.3 miter and a 17.5 bevel for a 38 degree spring angle.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #166207
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    To cut your 22.5 for the bullnose with the crown laying flat you would need a 14.3 miter and a 17.5 bevel for a 38 degree spring angle.

    Are these #s half the #s on my miter saw for the 45º cuts?

    #166209

    Nested and coped. Use two of these back to back and you can cope all sides any direction. It’s quite awesome. Never tried the Milwaukee ones, that’s just the type of product you’re looking for.
    Just put them back to back, slide them onto your angle grinder and tighten the nut.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-4-1-2-in-36-Grit-Sanding-Disc-25-Pack-48-80-0509/203112559

    #166212
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    To cut your 22.5 for the bullnose with the crown laying flat you would need a 14.3 miter and a 17.5 bevel for a 38 degree spring angle.

    Are these #s half the #s on my miter saw for the 45º cuts?

    No – it is less than half for both cuts. Laying flat the 45 degree cut settings are 31.6 miter and 33.9 bevel.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #166216
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Nested and coped. Each joint hand fitted.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #166493
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    nest and coped, grinder and sandpaper for fine tuning.

    on tricky or small pieces it miter & bevel

    #166504
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    nested and mitred.. 99% of the crown i do i mdf.. its too delicate for coping.. i do cope profiled baseboard though thats mdf as my trim supplier makes its base much more dense than their crown

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #166949
    CrpntrFeak
    Pro
    Globe, AZ

    Have done both nested/flat and mitered/coped.

    It all depends on what I am installing and where I am installing it. That and the mood I am in probably. LOL. Flat is nice on my DeWalt because it has detents, so it makes it a bit quicker.

    If it is crown for cabinets then all is mitered.

    #166965
    NJBuilder
    Pro
    Brick, NJ, 500,000 HAM

    Nested and mitered becuase my coping game is lame.

    #167091
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Nested and mitered because my coping game is lame.

    I feel the same way about my crowing game but it’s paint grade and it comes out looking good.

    #167126
    NJBuilder
    Pro
    Brick, NJ, 500,000 HAM

    Nested and mitered because my coping game is lame.

    I feel the same way about my crowing game but it’s paint grade and it comes out looking good.

    Well in that case there is always caulk! Lol

    #167138
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Nested and mitered because my coping game is lame.

    I feel the same way about my crowing game but it’s paint grade and it comes out looking good.

    Well in that case there is always caulk! Lol

    Caulk does help hide the imperfections, but nice fitting joints still look the best.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #167578
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Well it seems like most of us like to nest and cope.
    What about the bull nose drywall? Do you always go around the corner with a 22½º or do you ever do it with a 90º?

    #167610
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I have always done a 22.5°. Don’t see how 45°s would look right.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

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