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Favorite Miter Saw Blades

Viewing 20 posts - 121 through 140 (of 140 total)
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  • #619610
    Kevin6
    Pro

    @CB
    Yes, Bosch does tune in to try and help where we can. Thanks for highlighting the discrepancy between the catalog and web site, we are working to get more data added to the site, which is why we invite BTP members to send us any fixes on this thread:
    https://bethepro.com/forums/topic/bosch-power-tools-for-professionals/
    We welcome you to help us keep improving our info so we can answer more questions on our product.

    Thanks! See you around the site and keep up the contribution.
    Kevin
    Bosch Marketing

    #619632
    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    I am using bosch on my saws and I am happy with the quality of the blades. They do last a long time. I have couple properties blades. Sometimes is hard to find the specific blade. But I have some in stock just waiting.

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #619726
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    im still a fan of the freud diablos. their the most readily available and at a decent price point.

    the bosch blades are only available at one shop here for which im only in maybe 3 x a year. lee valley has the forest blades but just to rich for my blood

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #623155
    CB
    Spectator

    I don’t have much for comparison but I replaced the <b>60 tooth blade on my 12″ Glide</b> with a 96 tooth Dimar ATB full kerf (.132) blade. Absolutely clean cuts and much reduced scatter of dust. The chute picks up at least double the dust compared to the Bosch blade.

    My 96 Tooth Forrest Industrial Full Kerf Crosscut blade gave <b>the same improvement.</b> I think the higher tooth count makes smaller debris that makes it to the dust boot better.

    Normally, I try to edit out strings of quotes, but in this case, both quotes above are important, because I too, found an issue with the original 60T blade that Bosch ships with the North American version of the 12″ glide saw, and the recipe for improvement had nothing to do with the tooth count.

    The problem was the Bosch blade was bent. I discovered this after having only made about a dozen cuts with it. I had the blade straightened by a professional blade sharpener. It didn’t need sharpening, as the blade was new. It just lacked tension, and needed straightening.

    #623197
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I don’t have much for comparison but I replaced the <b>60 tooth blade on my 12″ Glide</b> with a 96 tooth Dimar ATB full kerf (.132) blade. Absolutely clean cuts and much reduced scatter of dust. The chute picks up at least double the dust compared to the Bosch blade.

    My 96 Tooth Forrest Industrial Full Kerf Crosscut blade gave <b>the same improvement.</b> I think the higher tooth count makes smaller debris that makes it to the dust boot better.

    Normally, I try to edit out strings of quotes, but in this case, both quotes above are important, because I too, found an issue with the original 60T blade that Bosch ships with the North American version of the 12″ glide saw, and the recipe for improvement had nothing to do with the tooth count.

    The problem was the Bosch blade was bent. I discovered this after having only made about a dozen cuts with it. I had the blade straightened by a professional blade sharpener. It didn’t need sharpening, as the blade was new. It just lacked tension, and needed straightening.

    Funny, I never thought to check the blade for straight. I was aiming to improve dust collection. The blade shipped with the saw cut well enough, it just scattered dust everywhere but into the boot.

    I will ask my sharpener to check it next time I am in. If nothing else, it will be a good backup to have on hand.

    Thanks for that @CB

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623200
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Usually the blades that come with saws aren’t the best. They cheap out so as not to raise the price on the saw. I am fine with that I rather get the blade I want to fit my needs. The dewalt flexvolt saw that I got is an exception thoug. The flexvolt blade is really good. Hardly any defection and the cut is pretty good. Better than most other thin kerf blades I have used. They made it specifically for that saw to get more run time.

    #623703
    CB
    Spectator

    A manufacturer making or spec’ing a saw blade specifically for their miter saw is an interesting paradox when compared to the assumption that miter saw manufacturers throw a cheap blade on the thing to keep the price competitive.

    The paradox, in Bosch’s case, is the free 30 day trial. If the blade was terrible out of the box, and a degradation of cutting performance was detected by the buyer, would that buyer return the saw?

    For example, if the FlexVolt only made 100 cuts per charge, versus the thrice as many cuts DeWalt advertises, would the FlexVolt be panned in the market place, with reviewers counting cuts, users getting frustrated, and potential buyers, reading these accounts, turning elsewhere?

    It seems to me that there is at least some incentive on the reputation table for a manufacturer to make an attempt at getting the stock issue blade right. With this in mind, a polar opposite assumption might be that a stock blade has had a lot of product planning and engineering mind power brooding behind it, in terms of the blade characteristics and fitness of purpose for both the machine, and the anticipated use.

    Thinking on this more, I can imagine why Bosch delivered the 60 tooth to the North American market, versus the 72 tooth to the European market, based on some stereotypically generalized differences between the types of materials cut and the pace of production expected that contrast the two different markets.

    But, I can’t imagine why the Bosch OEM blade was so far out of flatness, with no tension in the blade. I’d blame in on “Made In China”, but the Tenryu blade I bought was also Made In China, and like the Bosch blade, I had the Tenryu mounted on the blade flatness checker by my sharpener, and out of the box, it was within .001″. Dead flat for a 12″ blade under $100.

    #624327
    CB
    Spectator

    After mounting a truly flat blade (verified on a blade checking jig), it was time to recheck the new glide saw. The combination of the flat blade, centrifugal laser, and cutting 4×6 header material enabled me to visually see that the saw’s miter angle was off, as well as both the left and right bevels.

    Funny how all the new saw’s settings seemed ok out of the box to me during the first few cuts. Must have been honeymooner’s blush. Or the white lacy dress of 2x and 1x scraps I was using to test for square. Testing with 4x and 6x stock really removes the frilly veil and brings out the sins and warts that makes one wonder if they walked down the aisle and said “I do” with the right saw after all.

    An hour or so of tweaking every single adjustment on the saw with flat and straight blade dialed it in.

    #624455
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I think it’s well known that blades that come with saws are crap. Even my Unisaw had a POS blade when I bought it 16 years ago. The only exception is my Kapex or my Festool track saw. Their blades are excellent out of the box.

    #624557
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I think it’s well known that blades that come with saws are crap. Even my Unisaw had a POS blade when I bought it 16 years ago. The only exception is my Kapex or my Festool track saw. Their blades are excellent out of the box.

    Makita uses good blades on their new saws.

    #624564
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I think it’s well known that blades that come with saws are crap. Even my Unisaw had a POS blade when I bought it 16 years ago. The only exception is my Kapex or my Festool track saw. Their blades are excellent out of the box.

    The blade on my new Unisaw is actually a decent blade. Not Forrest but better than a lot I have used.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #624837
    CB
    Spectator

    And there is no sense in tossing aside 60 hunks of carbide as “crap” if the blade can be tensioned and straightened to within equivalent flatness specs of how Forrest or Tenryu blades are delivered from the factory.

    Both Tenryu and Forrest advertise that their blades are individually hand tensioned and peened for flatness. Having observed this manual labor intensive process that requires the skilled eye, expertise, and experience of a craftsman to get it right with the least number of pings on the blade, I can understand why the better blades cost more.

    But for a mere $20, one can get the same hand craftsmanship at their local blade sharpener (if she or he is competent in the craft), and get many miles of use out of the blade that was already paid for with the price of the saw.

    Diablo blades CANNOT be re-tensioned, and thus cannot be straightened. Nor can some of the Freud Industrial blades. Some can, but many can’t, due to the noise and vibration dampening slots that are laser cut into the mid field of the blade plate.

    So the choice is… keep rebuying new blades at $60 to $260 a pop… or keep resharpening decent blades at $20-$30 a pop.

    #624838
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    But for a mere $20, one can get the same hand craftsmanship at their local blade sharpener (if she or he is competent in the craft), and get many miles of use out of the blade that was already paid for with the price of the saw.

    My local sharpener offers this service; “hammering” as he calls it. I was unaware of it before but now I am a firm believer. He rescued 3 blades for me last visit. They were blades that I inherited from another deal and I ran them by him to see if they were any good. 3 more mlades to add to the useful arsenal for modest cost.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #624926
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    So the choice is… keep rebuying new blades at $60 to $260 a pop… or keep resharpening decent blades at $20-$30 a pop.

    Seems like a good way to save some money. Once you get a decent supply of blades you just keep them rotating to the sharpening service.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #624968
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    So the choice is… keep rebuying new blades at $60 to $260 a pop… or keep resharpening decent blades at $20-$30 a pop.

    Seems like a good way to save some money. Once you get a decent supply of blades you just keep them rotating to the sharpening service.

    One downside to this is even a great blade is only good for so many sharpening’s. Then ether the carbide is replaced or a new blade must be purchased.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #624970
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    So the choice is… keep rebuying new blades at $60 to $260 a pop… or keep resharpening decent blades at $20-$30 a pop.

    Seems like a good way to save some money. Once you get a decent supply of blades you just keep them rotating to the sharpening service.

    One downside to this is even a great blade is only good for so many sharpening’s. Then ether the carbide is replaced or a new blade must be purchased.

    I think another way to look at it as well if you use the regular blades and nick a nail or something in the wood, it wouldn’t suck as much as if you nick a forest blade.

    #624985

    So the choice is… keep rebuying new blades at $60 to $260 a pop… or keep resharpening decent blades at $20-$30 a pop.

    Seems like a good way to save some money. Once you get a decent supply of blades you just keep them rotating to the sharpening service.

    One downside to this is even a great blade is only good for so many sharpening’s. Then ether the carbide is replaced or a new blade must be purchased.

    I think another way to look at it as well if you use the regular blades and nick a nail or something in the wood, it wouldn’t suck as much as if you nick a forest blade.

    On really rough wood, I wire brush it down, them run a magmet over it. Found a few nails over the years. Im usually more worried about my planer knives

    #624997
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    But for a mere $20, one can get the same hand craftsmanship at their local blade sharpener (if she or he is competent in the craft), and get many miles of use out of the blade that was already paid for with the price of the saw.

    My local sharpener offers this service; “hammering” as he calls it. I was unaware of it before but now I am a firm believer. He rescued 3 blades for me last visit. They were blades that I inherited from another deal and I ran them by him to see if they were any good. 3 more mlades to add to the useful arsenal for modest cost.

    Yes, Cheap insurance for blade life. There is a place not far from my work that I have taken blades to get sharpened, if they can be saved.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #625001
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i just noticed two days ago home depot has the 40 tooth 8 1/2″ diablo blades in stock for around $40… ill be picking one of those up soon for my CM8S to use as a general purpose blade as i have 3 decks just about confirmed for teh summer

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #645087
    Doobie
    Moderator

    OLD THREAD WARNING.

    Hey guys, while somewhat frowned upon to do such, thought I’d bump an email notification I just got froam Ridge Carbide on some discounts present for some of their excellent high quality blades. This is mostly meant at you guys in the US. With $35 USD shipping to Canada, it doesn’t make make a good deal for us Canucks unless you are buying a few of them at the same time.

    These are not your BB store blades. Premium stuff! They stay sharp a loooooooong time!

    Box finger joint set.

    http://ridgecarbidetool.com/8-box-and-finger-joint-set.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=last-chance-to-save-this-summer-09-18_09-21-2017&utm_content=8-box-and-finger-joint-set-shop-now

    Dado set.

    http://ridgecarbidetool.com/6-dado-master.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=last-chance-to-save-this-summer-09-18_09-21-2017&utm_content=6-dado-master-shop-now

    Miter Saw blade.

    http://ridgecarbidetool.com/12-rs1000-super-blade-80-tooth.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=last-chance-to-save-this-summer-09-18_09-21-2017&utm_content=12-rs1000-super-80-tooth-miter-blade-shop-now

    The 10 blade Super miter blade is also on sale.

    For canucks,

Viewing 20 posts - 121 through 140 (of 140 total)
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