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Favorite Miter Saw Blades

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  • #476063
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    problem is the dull ones pile up and he ends up shelling out upwards of $250 because of the shear number of them being sent out

    Isn’t that the cost of doing business?

    yes he just didnt realize he had that many blades laying around that needed sharpening. if he didnt let them go that long and accumulate it wouldnt have been so bad

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #476276
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    problem is the dull ones pile up and he ends up shelling out upwards of $250 because of the shear number of them being sent out

    Still less expensive than buying new to replace them.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #477168

    Do any of you use FS Tool blades on your miter saws (or I suppose other saws)? They sound like pretty good deals if you can find one for the right price – industrial grade blades that can be resharpened a good bit and wear slowly

    I use FS Tool melamine blades on my table saw for building cabinets. They wear well and give a very clean cut. The sharpening outfit that I use in PEI is a dealer for FS Tool so I buy the blades from them since they have good prices.

    They are known for their Mel blades, rip blades, and miter saw blades. In a miter saw I usually run the SM6300. One of the shops I install for uses a really brittle and chip prone CV finish on their white tinted mouldings. I put the LM6301 H-ATB on and have zero issues. It’s not technically a miter saw blade because it lacks a raker but their are no stability issues.

    For less demanding work I switch to the Royce Ayr Proline blades. Really nice tooling for the money.

    #477182
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    problem is the dull ones pile up and he ends up shelling out upwards of $250 because of the shear number of them being sent out

    Still less expensive than buying new to replace them.

    very true.. but there are times i need a fresh blade but he doesnt have any that are sharp in the shop. so he has to buy a new one

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #477191
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’m currently using all bosch blades on my 10 inch glide have a 60 tooth 12 sliding have a 80tooth bosch tablesaw is also 80 tooth bosch but I got some new ones can’t wait to use them but I also have a sharpener machine if you can suspend 80 $ you’ll never have to buy a blade again I buy it anyway

    #477935
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    My go to blades will still be a Tenyru, Forrest or a Mitsushita blade.

    #619045
    CB
    Spectator

    One miter saw blade that I would like to try from Bosch is their “Noise/Vibration Reduced” blade that “features computer designed, laser-cut slots in body to reduce noise and vibration up to 20%”.

    Bosch further describes this blade as producing an “exceptionally fine finish that virtually eliminates sanding and fitting of parts.”

    This “Vibration Free” blade comes in both a 10″, 72 tooth flavor (PRO1072VF) as well as a 12″, 96 tooth flavor (PRO1296VF).

    I wanted to buy the 12″ version, but there’s just one problem. Bosch does not acknowledge the existence of this vibration free blade on Bosch’s website. A search for “PRO1296VF” yields zero results on any Bosch webpage that I have tried.

    Yet, I learned about this blade in Bosch’s current 2016/2017 Power Tools and Accessories catalog, a pdf copy of which is available on Bosch’s website, and a printed copy of which I recently picked up at the lumber yard. (Catalog #257 if Bosch is listening).

    So even while a different choice in Bosch blades, the PRO1296SM, is easily found on both the Bosch website as well as the Bosch catalog, I could only find the Vibration Free blade in the current printed catalog, and no mention whatsoever of this blade on the current Bosch website. Furthermore, most Bosch accessory dealers indicate that the PRO1296VF is currently “Out Of Stock”. Only one online dealer I found claimed they had it, but I have not verified this.

    So I’m wondering if Bosch discontinued the Vibration Free blade? Did the blade fail to work as well originally intended? Or was it so popular, that Bosch couldn’t keep them in stock? Either way, it is a puzzle why Bosch fails to mention anything about the 12″ vibration free blade on their website.

    Has anyone else heard anything about the vibration free blade from Bosch?

    Here are the stats on the 12″ version (PRO1296VF) VF stands for Vibration Free

    96 tooth
    TRI grind (combined ATB with a flat top grind every 3rd tooth)
    10 degree hook angle (Yeah, a little aggressive for a SCMS)
    .103″ plate thickness (can you say center plate stability?)
    .145″ kerf (Yeah, a big bite for a battery saw, but the Bosch glide is 15 amps of power, captain)

    With a 10 degree hook and a .145 kerf, this saw is definitely in plug in territory, and might be a little aggressive for some SCMS tasks, but hey, it’s supposed to be 20% more vibration free, and with a thick center plate, seem like it would have good positive points for blade stability, especially on a 12″.

    For comparison, the blade Bosch designates (but does not ship with) sliding compound miter saws is the PRO1296SM. SM stands for Sliding Miter.

    Note that the SM blade has the same tooth count (96) and the same plate thickness, at .103″, as the vibration free blade above. But the kerf is thinner, at .134″, and the hook angle is 0 degrees. Thinner kerf and shallower hook angle are definitely plusses for sliding miter saw duty.

    But the SM blade doesn’t have any laser cut, squiggly little lines on the plate, like we see in Freud blades, or like Bosch puts in the Vibration Free blade, as well as the 72 tooth blade that ships with the UK version of the glide.

    There are, however, four radial relief slots that quarter the row of teeth into four sections. Interestingly enough, the vibration free blade is divided into only three sections. Sometimes tripods can be more stable than four legged tables, but I don’t know if this same principle applies to radial slots cut into the perimeter of saw blades.

    Still, the VF blade has those other internal slots that the SM blade doesn’t.

    Finally, Bosch confounds us again with catalog to website inconsistencies when it comes to the SM blade grind specification. The printed catalog states that the SM blade is a TRI grand, like the VF blade above. However, the Bosch website reports that the SM blade is a triple chip grind (TCG).

    While tri and triple sound as if they would be similar, the TCG grind is quite different than a TRI, in that the TCG has no ATB component. The TCG is essentially a flat top grind alternated with a solid surface grind, and is intended for hardwoods, non-ferrous metals, and plastics, according to Bosch’s own explanation.

    So it is definitely a puzzle why Bosch can’t keep their story straight between defining the PRO1296SM blade as a TRI in the current catalog, and as a TCG on the current webpage for that blade. Well Bosch? Which is it? $100 bucks is too much money to leave us guessing about it.

    #619068

    One miter saw blade that I would like to try from Bosch is their “Noise/Vibration Reduced” blade that “features computer designed, laser-cut slots in body to reduce noise and vibration up to 20%”.

    Bosch further describes this blade as producing an “exceptionally fine finish that virtually eliminates sanding and fitting of parts.”

    This “Vibration Free” blade comes in both a 10″, 72 tooth flavor (PRO1072VF) as well as a 12″, 96 tooth flavor (PRO1296VF).

    I wanted to buy the 12″ version, but there’s just one problem. Bosch does not acknowledge the existence of this vibration free blade on Bosch’s website. A search for “PRO1296VF” yields zero results on any Bosch webpage that I have tried.

    Yet, I learned about this blade in Bosch’s current 2016/2017 Power Tools and Accessories catalog, a pdf copy of which is available on Bosch’s website, and a printed copy of which I recently picked up at the lumber yard. (Catalog #257 if Bosch is listening).

    So even while a different choice in Bosch blades, the PRO1296SM, is easily found on both the Bosch website as well as the Bosch catalog, I could only find the Vibration Free blade in the current printed catalog, and no mention whatsoever of this blade on the current Bosch website. Furthermore, most Bosch accessory dealers indicate that the PRO1296VF is currently “Out Of Stock”. Only one online dealer I found claimed they had it, but I have not verified this.

    So I’m wondering if Bosch discontinued the Vibration Free blade? Did the blade fail to work as well originally intended? Or was it so popular, that Bosch couldn’t keep them in stock? Either way, it is a puzzle why Bosch fails to mention anything about the 12″ vibration free blade on their website.

    Has anyone else heard anything about the vibration free blade from Bosch?

    Here are the stats on the 12″ version (PRO1296VF) VF stands for Vibration Free

    96 tooth
    TRI grind (combined ATB with a flat top grind every 3rd tooth)
    10 degree hook angle (Yeah, a little aggressive for a SCMS)
    .103″ plate thickness (can you say center plate stability?)
    .145″ kerf (Yeah, a big bite for a battery saw, but the Bosch glide is 15 amps of power, captain)

    With a 10 degree hook and a .145 kerf, this saw is definitely in plug in territory, and might be a little aggressive for some SCMS tasks, but hey, it’s supposed to be 20% more vibration free, and with a thick center plate, seem like it would have good positive points for blade stability, especially on a 12″.

    For comparison, the blade Bosch designates (but does not ship with) sliding compound miter saws is the PRO1296SM. SM stands for Sliding Miter.

    Note that the SM blade has the same tooth count (96) and the same plate thickness, at .103″, as the vibration free blade above. But the kerf is thinner, at .134″, and the hook angle is 0 degrees. Thinner kerf and shallower hook angle are definitely plusses for sliding miter saw duty.

    But the SM blade doesn’t have any laser cut, squiggly little lines on the plate, like we see in Freud blades, or like Bosch puts in the Vibration Free blade, as well as the 72 tooth blade that ships with the UK version of the glide.

    There are, however, four radial relief slots that quarter the row of teeth into four sections. Interestingly enough, the vibration free blade is divided into only three sections. Sometimes tripods can be more stable than four legged tables, but I don’t know if this same principle applies to radial slots cut into the perimeter of saw blades.

    Still, the VF blade has those other internal slots that the SM blade doesn’t.

    Finally, Bosch confounds us again with catalog to website inconsistencies when it comes to the SM blade grind specification. The printed catalog states that the SM blade is a TRI grand, like the VF blade above. However, the Bosch website reports that the SM blade is a triple chip grind (TCG).

    While tri and triple sound as if they would be similar, the TCG grind is quite different than a TRI, in that the TCG has no ATB component. The TCG is essentially a flat top grind alternated with a solid surface grind, and is intended for hardwoods, non-ferrous metals, and plastics, according to Bosch’s own explanation.

    So it is definitely a puzzle why Bosch can’t keep their story straight between defining the PRO1296SM blade as a TRI in the current catalog, and as a TCG on the current webpage for that blade. Well Bosch? Which is it? $100 bucks is too much money to leave us guessing about it.

    Can you link to that pdf?

    #619072
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    For me, the bar was set by the Forrest Chopmaster. All others fall short in my experience.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #619080
    Doobie
    Moderator

    For me, the bar was set by the Forrest Chopmaster. All others fall short in my experience.

    Ridge Carbide or FS Tools make them just as good. Just so you know for future reference.

    #619088
    CB
    Spectator

    Actually, no, I can’t. I’ve seen the link to Bosch’s pdf of the printed Bosch Power Tools & Accessories 2016/2017 catalog on Bosch’s website, but like I said, I picked up a real printed catalog at my local lumber yard (a real lumber yard, not a big box store), so I didn’t need to download the catalog, which is several hundred pages.

    Obviously, anyone can google “Bosch Power Tools & Accessories 2016/2016 catalog”, but on the odd chance that for some reason you were unable to, I googled it for you, and found that I was denied access to Bosch’s entire North American website. “Access Forbidden” when approached from several different links. Even when I went to Bosch’s world site, out of Germany, and selected North America, I could only access Mexico, in Spanish.

    Sounds a bit cloak and daggerish, but I wonder if my current IP address has been blocked specifically? I won’t know until I try a different IP address. In the meantime, the best that I could do for you right now is to come up with is accessing a similar but older catalog that was stored on Amazon’s S3 data server 5 years ago, from back in 2012/2013. The link to that pdf is here:

    http://dsassets.s3.amazonaws.com/wharton-hardware-supply/bosch-power-tools-accessories-catalog.pdf

    You might not have any trouble accessing Bosch’s current catalog though, so I suggest you try that first. I spent a fair amount of time on Bosch’s website earlier this week without problems. I guess I overstayed my welcome?

    #619112
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I don’t have much for comparison but I replaced the 60 tooth blade on my 12″ Glide with a 96 tooth Dimar ATB full kerf (.132) blade. Absolutely clean cuts and much reduced scatter of dust. The chute picks up at least double the dust compared to the Bosch blade.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #619117

    I don’t have much for comparison but I replaced the 60 tooth blade on my 12″ Glide with a 96 tooth Dimar ATB full kerf (.132) blade. Absolutely clean cuts and much reduced scatter of dust. The chute picks up at least double the dust compared to the Bosch blade.

    My 96 Tooth Forrest Industrial Full Kerf Crosscut blade gave the same improvement. I think the higher tooth count makes smaller debris that makes it to the dust boot better.

    Plus, it makes a very glass-like cut

    #619132

    There is a Chopmaster in my mitersaw and it delivers perfectly smooth cuts. Don’t know if I would ever try another now that I have had this one. @Doobie, I have heard of Ridge Carbide but have not tried any of their blades. Similarly priced to the Forrest?

    #619134
    keko
    Pro

    freud are the best but the bosch are good to.

    #619144
    CB
    Spectator

    Can you link to that pdf?

    My answer to this last night was deleted without explanation. (?)

    With a new IP address, I was able to visit Bosch’s website this morning without issue. Here is a link to the saw cutting portion of the current Bosch printed power tool catalog, in pdf form, that identifies the Vibration Free blade:

    https://www.boschtools.com/us/media/catalog/bosch_20162017_catalog_-_wood_and_metal_cutting.pdf

    (See attached photo below for a screen shot of the relevant content in the current Bosch catalog concerning the PRO1296VF vibration free blade)

    And here is the link to the Bosch website search results when the Bosch part/product number “PRO1296VF” is entered as a search term:

    https://www.boschtools.com/boschtools-search/us/en/search/search.htm

    (It is a message from Bosch stating “Your search for “PRO1296VF” produced 0 results.)

    And here is the link to the Bosch website search results when the terms “vibration free 12″ 96 tooth TRI” are entered into the Bosch search window:

    https://www.boschtools.com/boschtools-search/us/en/search/search.htm?searchTerm=vibration+free+12%22+96+tooth+TRI

    (It is a message from Bosch stating “Page Not Found. We are sorry.”)

    Attachments:
    #619148
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    freud are the best but the bosch are good to.



    @keko
    , you need to try a premium blade if you like freud blades. I rely heavily on Freud Industrial glue line rip blades, but otherwise, their blades have been less than impressive IMO.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #619149
    CB
    Spectator

    freud are the best but the bosch are good to.

    Since Bosch owns Freud (and Diablo, for that matter), it makes one wonder who makes specialty blades for Bosch? One would think that part of the whole idea in buying out a company is to utilize their assets and center of expertise.

    Ford claims to have purchased and held Jaguar for a period of time in order to acquire Jaguar’s design, development, and production acumen for aluminum car bodies. Then Ford sold Jaguar, and now Ford produces their most popular and profitable halo brand vehicles, the F-150 and F-Super Duty, in all aluminum bodies.

    One would think that Bosch would not only call upon their subsidiary Freud to produce blades for them, but to produce their very best blades in under Bosch’ halo brand, Bosch Professional, so as to leverage every dollar they paid for Freud’s center of expertise.

    This is one reason why I was looking at the various specialty blade offerings from Bosch… especially while the new Bosch glide saw is still under warranty. I didn’t want Bosch to use the excuse of a “improper, imbalanced, non approved” blade as an excuse for any saw failure during the warranty period.

    #619166
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I like the Forrest, Mitsushita and the Tenryus.

    #619181
    CB
    Spectator

    Has anyone had a chance to try the Forrest Miter Master?

    The Miter Master is available in 80t and 100t, with TCG, ATB, and ATBR grinds. Plate thickness is not disclosed, but kerf width is .105″ While arbor size is stated to be 5/8″, any arbor bore can be selected under the “options” menu. Prices between $223 to $273 per blade.

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