dcsimg

Fast way to clean up metal shavings?

Viewing 14 posts - 41 through 54 (of 54 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #396037
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I do eavestrough primarily,

    Dude,,, do you ever do rain gutters??
    So I look up this eavestrough and find it’s a northern US and canada thing.

    apparently eavestrough is the canadian word for rain gutter, was just googling it and thought it was the same thing.

    #718115
    marioo
    Pro

    A magnet will be useless when dealing with aluminum. But it would be good for finding and removing the harder and more dangerous steel pieces. Block all oil return passages. Remove cams, pull out the HLA’s. Try and soak up as much oil with rags as you can. Get a good light and take your time searching everywhere for pieces. When you think you’ve gotten them all (and got this head as dry of oil as possible) start blasting it with compressed air to send any pieces you missed flying out of there. Look over it again. Have good light. Patience will go a long way here.

    #718427
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    I have been using a nibbler to cut some shapes out of sheetmetal. This has left a ton of fingernail shaped clippings all over the shop floor.
    I picked up a magnetic pickup tool with quick release from harbor freight that really helps with collecting those up off the shop floor.

    Good investment IMO for $11.00.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #718447
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    A magnet will be useless when dealing with aluminum.

    Oh really?? I never knew that. Thanks.

    I have been using a nibbler to cut some shapes out of sheetmetal. This has left a ton of fingernail shaped clippings all over the shop floor.
    I picked up a magnetic pickup tool with quick release from harbor freight that really helps with collecting those up off the shop floor.

    Good investment IMO for $11.00.

    That’s a good investment. I learned the hard way you do not want to brush those little curly metals with you hand. Ouch!!!

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #718478
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    That’s a good investment. I learned the hard way you do not want to brush those little curly metals with you hand. Ouch!!!

    Yep you only do that once. I don’t like wearing mechanics gloves but I will when working with metal. I have been cut too many times.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #718553
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    That’s a good investment. I learned the hard way you do not want to brush those little curly metals with you hand. Ouch!!!

    Yep you only do that once. I don’t like wearing mechanics gloves but I will when working with metal. I have been cut too many times.

    Not only that, but if you wear soft-sole shoes/boots in the shop, those things will embed themselves into the shoe. Then when you walk back in the house on the brand new hardwood flooring — not good!

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #718561
    CB
    Pro

    Metal dedicated shop vacs. Have two. Ridgids. Still full of chips. Was hoping to use those chips in some creative way. Probably will never get around to it.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #718564
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    That’s a good investment. I learned the hard way you do not want to brush those little curly metals with you hand. Ouch!!!

    Yep you only do that once. I don’t like wearing mechanics gloves but I will when working with metal. I have been cut too many times.

    Not only that, but if you wear soft-sole shoes/boots in the shop, those things will embed themselves into the shoe. Then when you walk back in the house on the brand new hardwood flooring — not good!

    Why would you wear your boot or any shoe you wear outside into your home?? That’s just gross!

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #718591
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    don’t use a broom on metal shavings unless you want those shavings getting stuck on the ends which is impossible to get off.

    #718611
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    don’t use a broom on metal shavings unless you want those shavings getting stuck on the ends which is impossible to get off.

    Another truism for sure.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #737413
    Craigy
    Pro

    A magnet will be useless when dealing with aluminum. But it would be good for finding and removing the harder and more dangerous steel pieces. Block all oil return passages. Remove cams, pull out the HLA’s. Try and soak up as much oil with rags as you can. Get a good light and take your time searching everywhere for pieces. When you think you’ve gotten them all (and got this head as dry of oil as possible) start blasting it with compressed air to send any pieces you missed flying out of there. Look over it again. Have good light. Patience will go a long way here.

    That’s nonsense! Aluminum is metal so magnet MUST work with it! I don’t work with metal but I’m pretty sure

    #737415

    A magnet will be useless when dealing with aluminum. But it would be good for finding and removing the harder and more dangerous steel pieces. Block all oil return passages. Remove cams, pull out the HLA’s. Try and soak up as much oil with rags as you can. Get a good light and take your time searching everywhere for pieces. When you think you’ve gotten them all (and got this head as dry of oil as possible) start blasting it with compressed air to send any pieces you missed flying out of there. Look over it again. Have good light. Patience will go a long way here.

    That’s nonsense! Aluminum is metal so magnet MUST work with it! I don’t work with metal but I’m pretty sure

    Nope it’s not magnetic , unless it’s cast and porous and smaller particles of metal get trapped inside , even that is pushing the limits

    #737422
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    A magnet will be useless when dealing with aluminum. But it would be good for finding and removing the harder and more dangerous steel pieces. Block all oil return passages. Remove cams, pull out the HLA’s. Try and soak up as much oil with rags as you can. Get a good light and take your time searching everywhere for pieces. When you think you’ve gotten them all (and got this head as dry of oil as possible) start blasting it with compressed air to send any pieces you missed flying out of there. Look over it again. Have good light. Patience will go a long way here.

    That’s nonsense! Aluminum is metal so magnet MUST work with it! I don’t work with metal but I’m pretty sure

    Nope it’s not magnetic , unless it’s cast and porous and smaller particles of metal get trapped inside , even that is pushing the limits

    Magnets will only pick up ferrous metals. Aluminum copper things like that will not have an attraction to a magnet. Stainless steel also does not have magnetic properties.

    We cut and drill a lot of Aluminum for some of the school projects we do and also for deck railings. Cleanup is a PITA

    #737440
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    We cut and drill a lot of Aluminum for some of the school projects we do and also for deck railings. Cleanup is a PITA

    I hear you on aluminum shavings. Ferrous metals no problem but non-ferrous are a different story, I wonder if the new DC stuff will work on metal shavings?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

Viewing 14 posts - 41 through 54 (of 54 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.384 seconds