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exterior construction tips

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #613521
    Orides
    Pro

    Hi all,

    I would like your opinion about 2 things: (I’ll try to be as clear as possible for I’m not native English speaker)
    1. In order to give the pergola or any other exterior wood structure for that matter, durability and water resistance for many years is it necessary to extend any rafter or rafter support over her resting point? and what is the length it should stand out?
    Cause as much as I know, over time water will rotten the edge and the joint may loosen or something like that.

    2. What is the reason for cutting balusters diagonally on the bottom? is it for aesthetic or Practical reason (such as water drainage or something like that)?

    I’d be happy if you can share some more of your knowledge on how to make the construction last long in all weather conditions.

    All the best guys

    #613525
    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    I’m not sure if I understand exactly, but are you asking if you should have an overhang at the bottom of the pergola roof? Seems to me it’s always a good idea.

    Balusters cut diagonally on the bottom, I’m assuming these are the ones intended for screwing to the outside of a railing. I would say the diagonal cut is mostly for looks, maybe someone else knows a better reason.

    #613550
    Orides
    Pro

    This is what I meant. see attachment
    if the answer is no, then why not?
    Edited: the attached pergola is just for illustration

    Attachments:
    #613564
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I would say everything on that pergola is decorative.
    The angle on the top of a baluster helps shed water and the bottom is just looks.

    #613573
    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    Yes, I agree, thanks for the picture it helps. You could cut them all flush, if that’s what you like and if it’s your own. Definitely looks better if done like the picture though,in my opinion.

    #613584
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Sure you could cut the pergola at that red line, but would would you want to? Don’t you think it would look odd?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #613626
    Orides
    Pro

    certainly it would not look good but what I’m trying to get to is in this new attachment, I saw someone do it and I felt it was wrong for the reasons I mentioned in the beginning. Do you think that this corner joint will hold over time due to weather and what is the right way to do it?
    thanks all

    Attachments:
    #618487
    keko
    Pro

    the ends are done like that for looks as well as the spindles.

    #618489
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    both are entirely for looks,

    regarding the pergola there is no benefit when it comes to water. if you want to extend the life of the wood simply treating it with thompsons water seal is your best bet, just make sure you do it at the start of every summer

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #618589
    Doobie
    Moderator

    both are entirely for looks,

    regarding the pergola there is no benefit when it comes to water. if you want to extend the life of the wood simply treating it with thompsons water seal is your best bet, just make sure you do it at the start of every summer

    I used to use Thompsons, but it doesn’t last. I now prefer deep penetrating oil like Penofin.

    #618710
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    both are entirely for looks,

    regarding the pergola there is no benefit when it comes to water. if you want to extend the life of the wood simply treating it with thompsons water seal is your best bet, just make sure you do it at the start of every summer

    I used to use Thompsons, but it doesn’t last. I now prefer deep penetrating oil like Penofin.

    I agree, when Thompson’s changed their formula to comply with the new regs, their product became next to useless.

    I’m looking for a replacement for this summer, I have some resealing to do. Research is ongoing.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #618752
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I’m also not a Thompsons fan… I currently use Sikkens stains. They seem to last longer than the competition.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #618754
    CB
    Spectator

    certainly it would not look good but what I’m trying to get to is in this new attachment, I saw someone do it and I felt it was wrong for the reasons I mentioned in the beginning. Do you think that this corner joint will hold over time due to weather and what is the right way to do it?
    thanks all

    Orides, that last Sketch Up like diagram you posted is a recipe for water ponding dryrot. Water will get trapped in the top of the post, and water will get trapped in the partially rabbited relief cut for the cross rail. I would not build or pay for that design. Even if the timber joint integrity were supplemented by metal joint connectors, your original concerns about trapping water still remain. Good call on your part to seriously question this design.

    #618768
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    if you want to extend the life of the wood simply treating it with thompsons water seal is your best bet,

    I used to use Thompsons, but it doesn’t last. I now prefer deep penetrating oil like Penofin.

    I’m guessing you guys don’t use Pressure Treated lumber for outside building. We would use PT lumber and colorfast stain.

    #618790
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    the water seal prolongs the life of pressure treated… what type just depends on whatsa readily available

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

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