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End grain cutting board through a thickness planer?

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 56 total)
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  • #551411
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Just finished building my first random pattern end grain cutting board. I watched a video of a russian guy who builds these (with a shop full of amazing tools), and he runs them through his thickness planer. Watched another similar video and he highly recomends not doing that, so what do you guys think i should do? Finished thickness as of now is 1 1/2″, i’m afraid the planer may tear the endgrain, or worse explode the whole thing, although the nice flat surface it may leave is tempting. Size is 12″ × 16″, black walnut and maple, suggestions appreciated!

    #551412
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    ***well i want to preface everything i say here by stating, under NO circumstances should you run end grain through a planer as it can and may explode causing total wreckage of your planer and or any body parts in the way. ***

    What i do is the same thing the russian dude does, but i take super super super small cuts on every pass, I mean i really dial it down and just take more passes. I also use a hand plane or what have you to round over the back edge so the planer just doesn’t rip it to shreds as it passes through.

    #551418
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    ***well i want to preface everything i say here by stating, under NO circumstances should you run end grain through a planer as it can and may explode causing total wreckage of your planer and or any body parts in the way. ***

    What i do is the same thing the russian dude does, but i take super super super small cuts on every pass, I mean i really dial it down and just take more passes. I also use a hand plane or what have you to round over the back edge so the planer just doesn’t rip it to shreds as it passes through.

    I love the disclaimer followed by “but here’s how to do it anyway.” 😂

    I never knew a planer would explode end grain cutting boards, but I guess it makes a lot of sense. Those are some hard fibers just waiting to grab on and go for a ride :/

    Charlie
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    #551425
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I have never done it, but from what I have gathered, it may be worth your while to glue a strip on to the leading and trailing edge of the piece. This will help hold it together and any little chips and blow outs will be removed when the strips are cut off after planing. I too would use as light of a cut as possible.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #551426
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    ***well i want to preface everything i say here by stating, under NO circumstances should you run end grain through a planer as it can and may explode causing total wreckage of your planer and or any body parts in the way. ***

    What i do is the same thing the russian dude does, but i take super super super small cuts on every pass, I mean i really dial it down and just take more passes. I also use a hand plane or what have you to round over the back edge so the planer just doesn’t rip it to shreds as it passes through.

    I love the disclaimer followed by “but here’s how to do it anyway.” 😂

    I never knew a planer would explode end grain cutting boards, but I guess it makes a lot of sense. Those are some hard fibers just waiting to grab on and go for a ride :/

    lol i had to preface it as if you mess up, it can be extremely dangerous. Even if you don’t mess up, and it catches, you’ll be just as screwed.

    I have never done it, but from what I have gathered, it may be worth your while to glue a strip on to the leading and trailing edge of the piece. This will help hold it together and any little chips and blow outs will be removed when the strips are cut off after planing. I too would use as light of a cut as possible.

    The strips are great but i never find i have enough time to do that , so i just plane a round over to prevent the same thing.

    #551443
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    ***well i want to preface everything i say here by stating, under NO circumstances should you run end grain through a planer as it can and may explode causing total wreckage of your planer and or any body parts in the way. ***

    What i do is the same thing the russian dude does, but i take super super super small cuts on every pass, I mean i really dial it down and just take more passes. I also use a hand plane or what have you to round over the back edge so the planer just doesn’t rip it to shreds as it passes through.

    I love the disclaimer followed by “but here’s how to do it anyway.” 😂

    I never knew a planer would explode end grain cutting boards, but I guess it makes a lot of sense. Those are some hard fibers just waiting to grab on and go for a ride :/

    lol i had to preface it as if you mess up, it can be extremely dangerous. Even if you don’t mess up, and it catches, you’ll be just as screwed.

    I have never done it, but from what I have gathered, it may be worth your while to glue a strip on to the leading and trailing edge of the piece. This will help hold it together and any little chips and blow outs will be removed when the strips are cut off after planing. I too would use as light of a cut as possible.

    The strips are great but i never find i have enough time to do that , so i just plane a round over to prevent the same thing.

    Yeah, the Russian dude (mtmwood on YT) does it sometimes, he gets good use of the drum sander with them, which would be the preferred method.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #551467
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I never knew a planer would explode end grain

    Some species are worse than others…but I wouldn’t recommend it at all. A router planing sled is a better way to go I’d say.

    Ideally, you’d want all of the individual pieces to be darn near flush before flattening. If that’s the case, then so some aggressive sanding would probably be sufficient.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #551496

    Careful gluing, cauls to line it up perfectly, and a bit more attention at each step means you should be fine with just a bit of sanding

    And end grain should never go in a planer that doesnt have helical blades, and even then very carefully

    That said, inevitably it does all go to hell in some way, and the planer does a great job if you take light passes

    I will second the others here. If you accept the risks, its something I have done – and it worked out

    A razor sharp high angle plane is my preferred tool for this though – much more pleasant than a sander

    #551500
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    I wouldnt, but I know someone who has a drum sander. If that wernt the case I would probably be considering it at least but a big plane would work awesome.

    #551507
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Well, i put on my ear muffs, safety glasses, turned my privates away from the machine, said a little prayer and let her rip….no tearout, and most importantly, no explosion! I rounded the leading edges with my belt sander, and took very light cuts, thanks for that input r-ice! Worked very well really, i tried as best i could to get flat glue ups, used cauls and clamped every which way i could, but still seemed to have some slippage. The belt sander would have done the job, but not nearly as nice as the planer, and would have taken much longer, so now i know, but i think the advice from r ice was key, round the leading edge and very light cuts, and it got my adrenaline going that first pass or two, which is always a good thing! Thanks everyone!

    #551509
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Well, i put on my ear muffs, safety glasses, turned my privates away from the machine, said a little prayer and let her rip….no tearout, and most importantly, no explosion! I rounded the leading edges with my belt sander, and took very light cuts, thanks for that input r-ice! Worked very well really, i tried as best i could to get flat glue ups, used cauls and clamped every which way i could, but still seemed to have some slippage. The belt sander would have done the job, but not nearly as nice as the planer, and would have taken much longer, so now i know, but i think the advice from r ice was key, round the leading edge and very light cuts, and it got my adrenaline going that first pass or two, which is always a good thing! Thanks everyone!

    awesome looking board. Yah the planer does an amazing job at flattening it. I run all my boards through the planner but.. during the first few, i’ve managed to take too deep a cut and the board nearly went flying, i hit the emergency stop pretty fast. I also managed to rip the leading edges to shreds as i didn’t round them off and .

    #551510

    Well, i put on my ear muffs, safety glasses, turned my privates away from the machine, said a little prayer and let her rip….no tearout, and most importantly, no explosion! I rounded the leading edges with my belt sander, and took very light cuts, thanks for that input r-ice! Worked very well really, i tried as best i could to get flat glue ups, used cauls and clamped every which way i could, but still seemed to have some slippage. The belt sander would have done the job, but not nearly as nice as the planer, and would have taken much longer, so now i know, but i think the advice from r ice was key, round the leading edge and very light cuts, and it got my adrenaline going that first pass or two, which is always a good thing! Thanks everyone!

    Love the pattern!

    #551526
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    That looks great! I keep meaning to make one but never could get it started.

    #551529

    That looks great! I keep meaning to make one but never could get it started.

    Yeah, that’s a very cool looking design, and I’m with you, never can find the time to try it.

    #551556
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Looks good.
    My spectacled eyes see no hardwood in there. I could be wrong though. What say you?

    #551561
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    It’s a Picasso cutting board! Where did you come up with that pattern?…and how long did it take to assemble all of those irregular cuts?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #551564
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Black walnut and maple for most of it, but there’s also a piece of mystery wood i had laying around, but it’s not nearly as hard as the other two, i think it will hold up ok, i’m down to just sanding now, the softer wood survived all the machining so should be ok now. Thanks again r-ice, it sounds like i benefited from some of your earlier mishaps! I’ll post another pic after i oil it, the colors really popped when i wiped it down with a damp rag, so will look much better oiled up.

    #551569
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    The pattern just happens, after glueing random colored strips together, cut them at whatever thickness you want the board, turn 90′ so end grain is up, and glue those strips together. After that dries, slice the board up again on a bit of an angle, 5 or 10 degrees maybe, then rearrange the strips and glue them back together. Repeat that process again, but lengthwise this time if you cut crosswise the first time, rearrange strips again and glue it back together. I stopped at that point but you could slice and mix the pieces as many times as you want, but the board gets smaller each time from saw kerfs

    #551587
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    The pattern just happens, after glueing random colored strips together, cut them at whatever thickness you want the board, turn 90′ so end grain is up, and glue those strips together. After that dries, slice the board up again on a bit of an angle, 5 or 10 degrees maybe, then rearrange the strips and glue them back together. Repeat that process again, but lengthwise this time if you cut crosswise the first time, rearrange strips again and glue it back together. I stopped at that point but you could slice and mix the pieces as many times as you want, but the board gets smaller each time from saw kerfs

    Interesting process, maybe I’ll give it a try when I get some free time HA! Seriously though…it looks great!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #551597
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Wow that looks great. Very glad it didn’t explode after seeing how nice it looks.

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