dcsimg

Drywall Tools – Hawk or Mud Pan?

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 49 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #477262

    I used to use hawk, then switched back to pan. Both have there merits. Although, by me, all the drywallers use pans. I liked the hawk, but a loose mix always seemed to Disappeari before making it to the walls.

    #477369
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    i use the hawk as @58chev generously gifted me one of his and trained me to use one of them, i use it now for all my drywalling projects.

    #477383
    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    I like a hauk (sp)? I can keep mixing it back in so the mud doesn’t dry out like… Less draggers that way.

    Easier for me to clean too 🙂

    --Steve

    #477394
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Does it matter when using hot mud? I dont use a hawk anymore and certainly not since I have been using setting compounds but I thought I have heard it sets up slower spread out than in a pan.

    The opposite of what you would think. Not sure if thats accurate.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #477414
    Jpg-woodworking
    Pro
    Tallahassee, FL

    Does it matter when using hot mud? I dont use a hawk anymore and certainly not since I have been using setting compounds but I thought I have heard it sets up slower spread out than in a pan.

    The opposite of what you would think. Not sure if thats accurate.

    I haven’t used them, but if they cure via chemical reaction, it generates heat. The hotter the mix gets, the faster it will cure. So a 1/2″ deep puddle of mud on a hawk will stay cooler and not kick as quickly as a 2″ deep pile of it in a pan.

    #477417
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Thats a good point, figured that was the crust of the theory.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #477447

    Thats a good point, figured that was the crust of the theory.

    They have plastic Hawks to . Wonder if that’s different then aluminum on cure time .

    Always willing to learn .

    #477470
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Could be….When I was a young novice I switched from the hawk to a plastic pan with a metal edge…..man that sucked too but at least it wasnt sliding off. Been using a stainless steel pan for quite a while now.!!!!!

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #477536
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Does it matter when using hot mud? I dont use a hawk anymore and certainly not since I have been using setting compounds but I thought I have heard it sets up slower spread out than in a pan.

    The opposite of what you would think. Not sure if thats accurate.

    I haven’t used them, but if they cure via chemical reaction, it generates heat. The hotter the mix gets, the faster it will cure. So a 1/2″ deep puddle of mud on a hawk will stay cooler and not kick as quickly as a 2″ deep pile of it in a pan.

    Guess that’s why the mud on a hawk, for me anyways.. stays softer longer?? Makes sense.

    They have plastic Hawks to . Wonder if that’s different then aluminum on cure time .

    I don’t think I have seen a plastic hawk? Not to say that they are not out there.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #514918

    I don’t have a pan, I use the hawk at all times but see the merit in the pan for touch-ups and thin finish. Ive done plastering in my time and the move to the hawk for mud was just a natural progression.

    Carpenter and Joiner

    Joiner ... a person who constructs the wooden components of a building, such as stairs, doors, and door and window frames.

    Carpenter ... cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork.

    1970 ... to present.

    #515262
    Clev08
    Pro

    If I used a hawk it most of the mud would probably end up on the floor. So I use a pan or keep a bucket of mud close by and have two knives in my hand. I rarely do drywall and am far from a pro at it, so don’t judge lol

    #515269
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    For the few times I actually do drywall its always a pan, never tried to use a hawk. Drywall is one of those things that I avoid.

    #515270

    Could be….When I was a young novice I switched from the hawk to a plastic pan with a metal edge…..man that sucked too but at least it wasnt sliding off. Been using a stainless steel pan for quite a while now.!!!!!

    Those plastic pans are pure garbage!!!

    #515273
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    I don’t do a lot of mudding, but if I’m taping I water it down and just use a 5 gal bucket and throw all the paper tape in it lol

    After its taped and I’m doing my second coat I’m all about the hawk.

    #515288
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Whatch you talking about Willis? Throw the tape in the mud…..did I hear that correctly?

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #515295

    Pan guy here for normal mudding. Been using the same stainless pan for almost 18 years. I do have a hawk and use it when using a pool trowel to float out larger areas. Years and years ago we even redid a real plaster ceiling and that was all hawk work.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #515309
    CrpntrFeak
    Pro
    Globe, AZ

    Pan man here. Always have. Easier to keep thinner mud in one place. I mix up hot mud in a pan too so not sure how you would do that with a hawk and trowel. I have larger pans and knives for when I am doing a hand texture.

    I used to stucco all the houses we would build so I do know my way around with a hawk and trowel.

    So for me, drywall is pan and knife. Stucco is hawk and trowel.

    #515324
    vos
    Pro
    oswego, NY

    I have only used a hawk but might try a pan only because it fits in to most boxes and buckets unlike hawk

    #515351
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Pan fan. Never tried a hawke, so I don’t know.

    #523648
    dod
    Pro
    Dayton, OH

    I am not a pro drywaller but have done quite a bit of it. I always just load my 12″ knife and work off of that. I keep the bucket of mud close by.

    I do this too. It’s so easy to clean up.

    -Daniel

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 49 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.385 seconds