dcsimg

drywall returns vs actual trimmed windows cost comparison

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 41 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #417882
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    a while backi had a thread about how common it is to see drywall returns on windows and interior doors..

    i cant seem to find the thread so i started this one..

    the question now is whats the actual cost comparison for these two methods.

    theres a bit of tinkering around with drywall returns in order to get the padding on the framing perfect for fastening the drywall so it lines up perfect with the slots on vinyl windows… and then the time to apply bead.. then the time to bond it. let it dry, skim, then sand and skim again plus any touch ups

    with trim i know personally it takes me on average 30-40 mintues to trim a standard size window start to finish

    what are the numbers you guys typically work this out to being to charge a client, trim wise $75-90 time and material… drywall i dont have a clue

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #417887

    I don’t have specific figures, but we always felt it was a wash when compared to a picture frame trim job. We have done it both ways. You never seem to save as much time as you think you would doing drywall returns….that is doing them right with good reveal lines, tight corners, etc.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #417892
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I don’t have specific figures, but we always felt it was a wash when compared to a picture frame trim job. We have done it both ways. You never seem to save as much time as you think you would doing drywall returns….that is doing them right with good reveal lines, tight corners, etc.

    Agreed. While drywall returns Look cheaper..,they really aren’t. It takes 10x more effort per square inch to do a good drywall return than does to drywall a flat surface. While the materials are cheaper, the labor required makes the cost equal to or more expensive than wood. Additionally, it won’t stand up to abuse like wood will.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #417914
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I deal with the drywall returns all the time and it’s the finishing them to the window frame that is a labor thing. After cutting the mess and cleaning it out of the way I caulk it with color matching caulk to the frame.
    How are you guys doing it?

    #418145
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Not being a production new home builder, I wouldn’t really know a cost difference.

    Doing mostly remodel, I either follow what is already there, or go with wood trim. I have a strong distaste for drywall returns.

    Shimming drywall is not nearly as easy as shimming wood trim, and you can’t pre-build a “box” out of drywall, like you can with wood.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #418178
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    In the great Frozen North, were we can get condensation on windows during the winter, The drywall turns to mush in no time.

    Shop grade Birch for paint grade work is easy and probably as econo as you can get.

    #418290
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I think the labor associated with the casing job is about equal to the labor of the Drywall work. the way I see it the savings is in the material saved and the staining or painting of the material. Ordering a Vinyl window with out extension jambs saves 40 or 50 bucks alone, then the casing and finishing on top of that.

    I think the big production builders just make the drywall subs eat the labor of the drywall and the finishing so they would save even more. Our taper would charge a little extra for the windows but I would still see a savings.

    #418298
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The drywall returns come out looking nice.

    #418324
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I think the labor associated with the casing job is about equal to the labor of the Drywall work. the way I see it the savings is in the material saved and the staining or painting of the material. Ordering a Vinyl window with out extension jambs saves 40 or 50 bucks alone, then the casing and finishing on top of that.

    I think the big production builders just make the drywall subs eat the labor of the drywall and the finishing so they would save even more. Our taper would charge a little extra for the windows but I would still see a savings.

    That is absolutely correct. Labor wise it seems like a wash at best. Not having the cost of the hardwood trim, plus the cost of painting/staining is the difference. I would think at best $15-$20 per window.

    #418332
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I deal with the drywall returns all the time and it’s the finishing them to the window frame that is a labor thing. After cutting the mess and cleaning it out of the way I caulk it with color matching caulk to the frame.
    How are you guys doing it?

    I agree , there is a lot more time when it comes to mudding them and sanding them compared to trimming them with wood .

    #418336
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I think the labor associated with the casing job is about equal to the labor of the Drywall work. the way I see it the savings is in the material saved and the staining or painting of the material. Ordering a Vinyl window with out extension jambs saves 40 or 50 bucks alone, then the casing and finishing on top of that.

    I think the big production builders just make the drywall subs eat the labor of the drywall and the finishing so they would save even more. Our taper would charge a little extra for the windows but I would still see a savings.

    That is absolutely correct. Labor wise it seems like a wash at best. Not having the cost of the hardwood trim, plus the cost of painting/staining is the difference. I would think at best $15-$20 per window.

    I would figure about double that with staining and then the cost of the extension jambs on top, but still not much over 60 to 75 bucks a Window. the plan I am working on now would only have 7 04 8 windows so a savings in the 500 bucks range. In our area it would not be a wise savings to try to make. Drywall returns seem very entry level or apartment grade to me. If I were building row houses, affordable housing or apartments, I would probably take the savings.

    #418393

    Now I did bullnose returns on my own house when I built it. We did it because we wanted a more modern clean look. The wifey isn’t a big trim fan 🙁 . But I do like bullnose or chamfer returns.

    To get my corners perfect I made a bullnose piece of 2x that I could set the TrimTex vinyl bullnose on and cut it with a miter saw to get caulkless miters.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #418406
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    it seems all the architects are going for the commercial look in homes… its definitely true that they dont hold up… especially in colder climates.. i dont know how many windows i saw with crumbling drywall returns when i worked at the university… the gc is trying to convince the architect to nix the drywall returns on this house though.. they just dont hold up the same

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #418414
    redwood
    Pro

    I’m with Kurt, the labor is about equal (unless it is stain grade), and the extra cost is in the materials.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #418433
    lulu
    Pro

    thank you for starting this thread.

    Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle.
    Michael Angelo

    #418440
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Now I did bullnose returns on my own house when I built it. We did it because we wanted a more modern clean look. The wifey isn’t a big trim fan :( . But I do like bullnose or chamfer returns.

    To get my corners perfect I made a bullnose piece of 2x that I could set the TrimTex vinyl bullnose on and cut it with a miter saw to get caulkless miters.

    That came out looking good. So that’s 2x with a turned edge, and you drywalled right up to it and mudded it in , sand to perfection and whamo.

    #418442
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    thank you for starting this thread.

    What

    #418448
    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    Now I did bullnose returns on my own house when I built it. We did it because we wanted a more modern clean look. The wifey isn’t a big trim fan :( . But I do like bullnose or chamfer returns.

    To get my corners perfect I made a bullnose piece of 2x that I could set the TrimTex vinyl bullnose on and cut it with a miter saw to get caulkless miters.

    That came out looking good. So that’s 2x with a turned edge, and you drywalled right up to it and mudded it in , sand to perfection and whamo.

    I think he just used the 2x on the mitre saw to make the cuts in the bullnose

    I did some that were bullnose sides and top, with a wood stool. It was a deep return, and the wood made it so they could set plants on it without worrying about water.

    I thought it looked pretty good

    --Steve

    #418510
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I think he just used the 2x on the mitre saw to make the cuts in the bullnose

    Oh thanks,, I needed to go reread that one.. that’s a great idea.

    #418668
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    I see a lot of molded drywall here in Northern California as well, especially in these newer, tightly sealed houses.

    Besides, I think it tends to look a little builder-grade.

    But I know that wasn’t the point of your thread, it was just about cost. 🙂

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 41 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.522 seconds