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Do you ever use the "golden ratio" when building or designing your projects?

This topic contains 26 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  smallerstick 11 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 21 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #667812

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    All I did was use a label machine and printed out “Golden Ratio 1:1.618”. I just stuck it on a cabinet above my workbench.

    That’s such a good idea. It works for so many calculations in the shop every day. I know I need to be more mindful about using it.

    Aston Martin uses the golden ratio extensively in the design of their cars. This is probably why I have always thought they look so balanced and beautifully proportioned.

    I didn’t know that and yes it’s a good example of how well the ratio works.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #667830

    1:1.6 is the ratio rounded. I used to make speaker enclosures and that was the first time I read about it (many moons ago). For the design of the enclosure you would take the width, multiply that by 1.6 for the height, and multiply the width by .6 for the depth. You would figure out the volume of the box and check that against the recommended volume for the cones and you would have a good sounding set of speakers (depending on the quality of the cones of course).

    Yup

    The Golden ratio is a special number found by dividing a line into two parts so that the longer part divided by the smaller part is also equal to the whole length divided by the longer part.

    #667835

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i try to whenever possible.. its always best to keep the elements of design balanced and proportioned.. but with so many modern designers out there drawing things up where they dont take it into consideration its hard to

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #667836

    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    As a young child I learned the “golden rule”, but I never learned about the “golden ratio”. Gonna have to do some studying on it, not sure if my weak mind is up to the task though!

    #667848

    You can also buy, or build, dividers with the ratio built in.

    https://goo.gl/images/P6GZx3

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #694758

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Not quite the golden ratio but there was a time I spent a few years working as a design engineer that provides highway design services to clients like the Florida Department of Transportation and the Florida Turnpike Authority.

    We regularly employ spirals into the geometry for roadway design and railway design. It’s required in many states for high speed roadways.

    You see, when you drive in a straight line, and suddenly there is a curve ahead of you bending to the right, we do not design a straight line then a circular arc. It would be too “sudden” for a driver to be driving a straight line one second and the next is a 1000′ radius arc.

    So what we do is we fit in a horizontal spiral (technically it is a clothoid, or “Euler” spiral) it is a curve that will gradually go from infinite radius (straight line) to a finite radius meeting the arc. There is a transition spiral on each end of a circular arc.

    This is especially important for rail design, as the rail cars going through a bend has to transition from a straight line to an arc gradually within the rails. For highways it is not as critical especially for small cars where the lane is wide enough to steer the transition within the lane width.

    #694766

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    So what we do is we fit in a horizontal spiral (technically it is a clothoid, or “Euler” spiral) it is a curve that will gradually go from infinite radius (straight line) to a finite radius meeting the arc. There is a transition spiral on each end of a circular arc.

    That would be a really good element to use in furniture design. Thanks for sharing.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

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