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Do you ever use the "golden ratio" when building or designing your projects?

This topic contains 26 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  smallerstick 9 months ago.

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  • #667708

    The golden ratio(divine proportion, it has a few different names) is a subject that I’m vastly interested in. Nature itself uses the ratio for many of it’s designs, and humans have been using it for thousands of years for all types of applications. Cereal box dimensions? Golden ratio. Sunflower seed spiral pattern? Golden ratio. Mona Lisa? Golden ratio. The Great Pyramids? Golden ratio. Builders can use it for stair dimensions or window dimensions to make them more aesthetically pleasing among other uses. From the smallest known particles, to the shape of galaxies, it’s everywhere. If you’ve used it before I’d be thrilled to hear about it, or even just talk about the golden ratio and maybe inspire some people to give it a try.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667711

    I have read about it, and I have taken the principles into consideration, but I have not religiously implemented the ratios on my own designs as of yet.

    Will

    #667712

    xtsallad
    Pro
    Dallas, TX

    It turns out that I use it a lot but many times I’m just estimating it visually rather than using the math. I use it more as a starting point for layout and design as things are also relative to what is around it. I use it the very most for taking pictures. Much of contemporary formal design composition theory has been gravitating toward a rule of thirds (a little tighter toward center than ‘golden mean’) and its a loose rule as well.

    j

    #667718

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    One of the fundamental elements of design; great thread!

    The golden ratio has so many uses in both woodworking and construction to give the most pleasing proportions. Designing interior woodwork; the height of the base, position of the chair rail, shape of the panels, size of the crown are all determined by the golden ratio. The ratio of the height to the width of a chest, the shape of the panel on a door determines to some extent the width of the rails and stiles.

    Another useful tool is the Hambridge progression which I use to determine the height of each drawer in a graduated drawer chest.

    Jim Tolpin’s book, Measure Twice, Cut Once devotes much attention to the use of the golden ratio in design.

    This illustration shows similar ratios among parts of the body; the length of your hand to your forearm and so on. Your navel is positioned at 5/8 of your height.

    Attachments:

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #667720

    You mean 1:1.6? Never heard of it….lol

    You may want to look into the book “By Hand and Eye” by George Walker and Jim Tolpin. They go very in depth on classic ratios and design.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #667725

    You mean 1:1.6?

    I don’t think so but maybe.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667726

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    You mean 1:1.6? Never heard of it….lol

    You may want to look into the book “By Hand and Eye” by George Walker and Jim Tolpin. They go very in depth on classic ratios and design.

    I wish I could afford a copy..

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #667728

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Pythagorean theorem? 3/4/5 triangle? I literally have no clue what the golden ratio is!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #667729

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    You lost me …. what the ????

    #667730

    Pythagorean theorem? 3/4/5 triangle? I literally have no clue what the golden ratio is!

    It’s been around in ancient cultures but the way modern culture discovered it is through the Fibonacci numbers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number . It’s so much bigger than that though, maybe one of the most fascinating thing’s in the universe but also a simple trick to use in building design for us trades guys. It’s really not too complicated once it clicks, but most people in the world don’t know about it, although I’ve been told there’s a club of some of the worlds greatest minds that’s dedicated to the golden ratio. If you want I’d suggest googling a few things like “golden ratio in buildings” , “golden ratio in art , “golden ratio in nature” , “golden ratio in humans” , or actually youtube videos gloss over all of it and would give a good picture. Here’s a decent video on it I’ve watched https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keLN89CWZ-A

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667734

    One of the fundamental elements of design; great thread!

    The golden ratio has so many uses in both woodworking and construction to give the most pleasing proportions. Designing interior woodwork; the height of the base, position of the chair rail, shape of the panels, size of the crown are all determined by the golden ratio. The ratio of the height to the width of a chest, the shape of the panel on a door determines to some extent the width of the rails and stiles.

    Another useful tool is the Hambridge progression which I use to determine the height of each drawer in a graduated drawer chest.

    Jim Tolpin’s book, Measure Twice, Cut Once devotes much attention to the use of the golden ratio in design.

    This illustration shows similar ratios among parts of the body; the length of your hand to your forearm and so on. Your navel is positioned at 5/8 of your height.

    You sir, have made my day. I’m going to look into the Hambride progression now and I think I will buy that book as well. I’ve been looking forward to meeting a woodworker, carpenter, or mason that used the golden ratio. An online forum meeting will suffice though and I’m quite happy.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667737

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    Here is a visual of the Fibonacci sequence…

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #667747

    Here is a visual of the Fibonacci sequence…

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/PfsbzjdO4_8?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=”” width=”770″ height=”433″ frameborder=”0″></iframe></figure>

    I’ve watched that one before as well, it’s a good representation of the spiral forming naturally in real time but I’m getting the sense we should try link informative content so anyone can digest and participate in the conversation.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667749

    1:1.6 is the ratio rounded. I used to make speaker enclosures and that was the first time I read about it (many moons ago). For the design of the enclosure you would take the width, multiply that by 1.6 for the height, and multiply the width by .6 for the depth. You would figure out the volume of the box and check that against the recommended volume for the cones and you would have a good sounding set of speakers (depending on the quality of the cones of course).

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #667752

    1:1.6 is the ratio rounded. I used to make speaker enclosures and that was the first time I read about it (many moons ago). For the design of the enclosure you would take the width, multiply that by 1.6 for the height, and multiply the width by .6 for the depth. You would figure out the volume of the box and check that against the recommended volume for the cones and you would have a good sounding set of speakers (depending on the quality of the cones of course).

    Excellent reply! Coincidentally I became interested in sound waves and wave movement in general after I learned about the Golden ratio. This just further fed my enthusiasm to learning more about sound.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667761

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    heard a lot about it but never really paid attention to it in design.

    #667763

    I use it all the time for my woodworking projects. I made a label and put it in a prominent spot in the shop for easy reference.

    #667769

    I use it all the time for my woodworking projects. I made a label and put it in a prominent spot in the shop for easy reference.

    Any chance you’d share a picture of that label?

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667771

    All I did was use a label machine and printed out “Golden Ratio 1:1.618”. I just stuck it on a cabinet above my workbench.

    #667792

    Clev08
    Pro

    I first learned about it from the show “numbers” when I was in middle school and was very intrigued by it. The Fibonacci sequence is 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55…. you get the next number in the sequence by adding the previous two numbers together. Aston Martin uses the golden ratio extensively in the design of their cars. This is probably why I have always thought they look so balanced and beautifully proportioned.

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