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Diffrent soil compaction method

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  • #419532

    Close to my house they have been building a ton of both commercial and 4 story residential building over the past 4 years. I have noticed that they always have problems with the soil compaction. They always start with dynamic compaction followed by driving hundred of wood and steel piles. So far the have done every building like this. The last one they did they did something i have never seen and wonder if anyone knows the method. They trucked in hundreds of tons of dirt and piled it about thirty feet high over the entire site and left it for several months. At first i thought they were just moving dirt around. then i started noticing benches and heights marked out with survey post. Now they have removed all the dirt and have started the foundation with out any compaction or piles. Has anyone seen this before?

    #419537
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    I’ve never seen that. I know pile tech has come a long way but around here they don’t even want you building on disturbed soil. Too much heaving.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #419553
    lulu
    Pro

    yeah never heard of it. around here we bring in dirt wet it then compact it. they repeat that until they reach the top. don’t understand how that method you described compacts?

    Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle.
    Michael Angelo

    #419660
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Thats quite interesting, did you happen to get any photos during the dirt compaction ?

    #419673
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I read about a bridge they built in MN like that, using 1000s of tons of dirt on the site for months to compact it. Seems to be the way things are going.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #419681
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    It is called surcharging a site. They add a significant load on top of the existing soils using the weight of the additional soils they bring in to compress the existing soils below. It only works for specific soils. They install monitors to determine the compaction they achieve of the existing soils. It is not used a lot, I think I have seen it on sites a couple of times over the 30 years have been interested in that type of thing. In this day and age, where time is money, most building owners are not willing to spend the time waiting as it is a fairly slow process. In the case you mentioned, it was probably a situation where the soils were just right and they could save the cost of the piles, making it an economical option.

    #419741
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Speaking of which, I have to fill a pier dig-out and re-compact the soil. Was thinking of using my Bosch SDS-Max rotary hammer with the tamper accessory for the first time to assist with this.

    #419764
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    It seems like it would really cost a lot to bring in all that soil and then move it out again.

    #419768
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Here in Cincinnati, bringing in dirt to a site for homes is not looked upon well by the structural engineers. We build decks for a home developer, and when we have a slope of most any kind, we have to use a geo-tech, and the very first question is, do we know if the dirt was brought in to the lot. If we don’t know, we have to find out. If yes, the geo-techs don’t like it at all, and have been required to dig through it until we hit bedrock just for small decks. Then he will test the soil at the bottom of the hole, and tell us yes or no. Had to use hydro-excavaton at one point, to dig 17′ deep footer holes. I couldn’t imagine utilizing that much uncompacted dirt, but then again I’m not an engineer.

    #419772
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Speaking of which, I have to fill a pier dig-out and re-compact the soil. Was thinking of using my Bosch SDS-Max rotary hammer with the tamper accessory for the first time to assist with this.

    Just make sure you got the right shank Doobie. I didn’t first time and choked it out bad .

    #419790
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    @MJconstruction

    Where are you located ? What kind of soil in your area ?

    Seems like a slow process and how they deal with rain water in the hole during that time.

    #419918
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Here in Cincinnati, bringing in dirt to a site for homes is not looked upon well by the structural engineers. We build decks for a home developer, and when we have a slope of most any kind, we have to use a geo-tech, and the very first question is, do we know if the dirt was brought in to the lot. If we don’t know, we have to find out. If yes, the geo-techs don’t like it at all, and have been required to dig through it until we hit bedrock just for small decks. Then he will test the soil at the bottom of the hole, and tell us yes or no. Had to use hydro-excavaton at one point, to dig 17′ deep footer holes. I couldn’t imagine utilizing that much uncompacted dirt, but then again I’m not an engineer.

    17′ footers seem a bit extreme to me for a deck. I’m not a engineer so I guess you have no choice but to do what they say. I bet that adds a lot to the cost of the deck.

    #419929
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Speaking of which, I have to fill a pier dig-out and re-compact the soil. Was thinking of using my Bosch SDS-Max rotary hammer with the tamper accessory for the first time to assist with this.

    Just make sure you got the right shank Doobie. I didn’t first time and choked it out bad .

    I do. The shank and plate are both Bosch items.

    This was the first time I use it as well. Now I can’t get the shank seperated from the plate. Tried wacking it off with a hammer, but to no avail. Now I won’t be able to get it back in the case stored with the rotary hammer.

    There’s a trick in applying heat or cold to one of the pieces to get it to expand or contract that will allow the shank to dislodge from the insert in the plate, but I could never recall which way that high school taught physics trick works. Does anybody know?

    #419932
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    cold to the shaft or heat to the plate.

    #419969

    I’m up in north jersey and this is a big condo project. They dug and poured the footings in the last three days. It is one of those five story wood frame apartment complexes like the one in edge water nj that burnt a couple months ago. They put these things up in three months and they’re built like crap.

    #419996
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I guess I witnessed this happening here and didn’t know it. In an area where they are extending the interstate and putting in new exits, they were piling soil (and concrete chunks) for months before they moved 90% of it and built the exit ramp.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #420107
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Just block from me is all fill and to build you need to go down 7-8 feet to almost hitting water. Then many layer of compaction rock with inspections every few feet.

    #420142
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    There’s a trick in applying heat or cold to one of the pieces to get it to expand or contract that will allow the shank to dislodge from the insert in the plate, but I could never recall which way that high school taught physics trick works. Does anybody know?

    cold to the shaft or heat to the plate.

    Good job Kurt……. Heat expands everything, A shaft gets bigger. Something with a hole like say a gear or a housing expands too but when it does the hole gets bigger.

    A lot of mechanical things are assembled using this method when they want a pressed fit, I’ve seen where they store a pin/shaft in a 90* below 0 freezer before assembly. Then it slips right in the hole, When it warms up it’s tight

    #420170
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    In an area where they are extending the interstate and putting in new exits, they were piling soil (and concrete chunks) for months before they moved 90% of it and built the exit ramp.

    This method is really getting to be popular for soil compaction.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #420190

    <P>There’s a trick in applying heat or cold to one of the pieces to get it to expand or contract that will allow the shank to dislodge from the insert in the plate, but I could never recall which way that high school taught physics trick works. Does anybody know?</P>

    <P>cold to the shaft or heat to the plate.</P>

    <P>Good job Kurt……. Heat expands everything, A shaft gets bigger. Something with a hole like say a gear or a housing expands too but when it does the hole gets bigger. </P>
    <P>A lot of mechanical things are assembled using this method when they want a pressed fit, I’ve seen where they store a pin/shaft in a 90* below 0 freezer before assembly. Then it slips right in the hole, When it warms up it’s tight</P>

    thats exactly what we used to do building military consoles , we would put the bushings in the dry ice box over night , then they would just drop in the next day, few minutes later , they unthaw and not coming out at all.

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