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Deck Mistakes

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 134 total)
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  • #384967
    Doobie
    Moderator

    When I’ve got a lot of ends to deal with, I’ve used a drywall mud tray and fastened the tray to a board with pull ties. That way I can just dip the board ends in without having to brush them.

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    #385055
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We like to keep a shallow bucket of the medicine to use to Dip the cut ends in.

    I just use a cheap China bristle brush and brush it on.

    Do you dip the China bristle brush into a bucket of the medicine?

    #385834
    redwood
    Pro

    When I used to use good old growth redwood for posts, I had a large drain pipe with a cap on the end. I built a little stand to hold it up. Fill with preservative and stick the posts in for a little while. I swear it added years to the longevity of the posts.

    Out west, Ethan is right, we use incised Douglas Fir for pressure treated lumber. Even with the incising, the penetration rarely is deeper then 1/2″. Treat all end cuts twice. The ends are where most rot occurs and they will suck up the preservatives.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #385881
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Lumber today is not what it used to be. The treating is not as good either. It takes a lot of attention and detailing to make sure that you do not have problems down the road.

    #385885
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    We like to keep a shallow bucket of the medicine to use to Dip the cut ends in.

    I just use a cheap China bristle brush and brush it on.

    Do you dip the China bristle brush into a bucket of the medicine?

    Yeah, I dipp the brush into a bucket of the stuff then slapp it on my cuts. The brush makes it easy to treat all the cuts on stringers and 6×6’s

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #385928
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Lumber today is not what it used to be. The treating is not as good either. It takes a lot of attention and detailing to make sure that you do not have problems down the road.

    I heard the same thing especially on cedar, that the new growth cedar is nothing like the old growth which gave cedar its rot resistant reputation.

    #385954
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Lumber today is not what it used to be. The treating is not as good either. It takes a lot of attention and detailing to make sure that you do not have problems down the road.

    I heard the same thing especially on cedar, that the new growth cedar is nothing like the old growth which gave cedar its rot resistant reputation.

    I’ve heard that from so many who have much more long term history than me. They talk about cedar decks that are rotting in 10-12 years where they have others they built 20+ years ago that are still going strong. Too much on the market is rapid farm grown cedar apparently.

    #385963
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Lumber today is not what it used to be. The treating is not as good either. It takes a lot of attention and detailing to make sure that you do not have problems down the road.

    I heard the same thing especially on cedar, that the new growth cedar is nothing like the old growth which gave cedar its rot resistant reputation.

    Hadn’t heard that…doesn’t surprise me though. With all of the old growth used up, it’s not surprising that the younger wood isn’t as resilient.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #385988
    redwood
    Pro

    I think it’s even a worse case with redwood, since redwood only grows in very small areas of the world, mainly parts of No. Calif and southern Oregon.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #386040
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Are most of you guys in the states using, or simply only using because there is no choice otherwise, the brown PT now?

    It’s really starting to proliferate here in the Toronto area in just the last two years. Green PT is starting to become a special order with suppliers.

    #386063
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We like to keep a shallow bucket of the medicine to use to Dip the cut ends in.

    I just use a cheap China bristle brush and brush it on.

    Do you dip the China bristle brush into a bucket of the medicine?

    Yeah, I dipp the brush into a bucket of the stuff then slapp it on my cuts. The brush makes it easy to treat all the cuts on stringers and 6×6’s

    OK gotcha,,, I was going to say I just leave out the brush part but you pulled out of that one nicely. We use a brush too for that stuff.
    Does the bucket of medicine always get dumped over??

    #386185
    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    One of my guys put a gallon of CopperGreen in the back of my van with the lid on loosely last year. There was only a few cups in there but I can still smell it.

    Are most of you guys in the states using, or simply only using because there is no choice otherwise, the brown PT now?

    It’s really starting to proliferate here in the Toronto area in just the last two years. Green PT is starting to become a special order with suppliers.

    I think it’s all about the location. Doug fir gets incised and brown treatment and is what’s available in the West. Out East, we get all SYP and that gets the green treatment. The largest PT company in New England is 20 minutes from my house and they ONLY use SYP.

    Personally, I think the brown looks better for most decks.

    #388168
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    This is the coating we typically use for cuts on the treated lumber

    #388276
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    This is the coating we typically use for cuts on the treated lumber

    Man that would make a big spill. And I would spill it.

    #388287
    Doobie
    Moderator

    This is the coating we typically use for cuts on the treated lumber

    Man that would make a big spill. And I would spill it.

    For things like that, I look to secure/protect the can somehow.

    Cans lying around for stuff like that are spills/waste waiting to happen even for tidy types like me working alone.

    #388291
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Are most of you guys in the states using, or simply only using because there is no choice otherwise, the brown PT now?

    It’s really starting to proliferate here in the Toronto area in just the last two years. Green PT is starting to become a special order with suppliers.

    I just started replacing boards in my green PT deck to brown as I couldn’t find any green around. Hopefully the brown has better rot resistance then the green. What prompted the change was me stepping foot through the board.

    #389828
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    We always order STP #1’s and it’s still green. We haven’t seen any brown pt yet. I know the supplier here that distributes to the lumber companies gets it from southern u.s. Southeast corner of TN there are endless pine tree groves. old paper mill there did own it all. Ended up in bankruptcy and now selling it all off to lumber yards. All very young growth

    #389949
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Are most of you guys in the states using, or simply only using because there is no choice otherwise, the brown PT now?

    It’s really starting to proliferate here in the Toronto area in just the last two years. Green PT is starting to become a special order with suppliers.

    Both the green and brown treat are readily available here. We still use the green for some things. The brown we use for decks even if it is only the frame. It is kiln dried after treating (KDAT) which makes it more dimensionally stable as well as more uniform in weight. we have started a Pergola with the Brown treated. There are photos on page 25 of the what did you do today thread I believe.

    #390085
    redwood
    Pro

    Other then sometimes omitting the handrail requirements, I don’t do any of those bad boy things. When we do make add a handrail, we take a 2×6 and rout it to acceptable specs.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #390113
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    RW I like the finger detail on the 2×6 and have used in the past too.

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