dcsimg

Deck Mistakes

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 134 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #383138
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I found this article on the top 10 deck failures and thought I would share it.

    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/articles/top-10-deck-building-mistakes.aspx

    With all of the deck failures we see, I thought it was good information. Imhace seen a lot of these items on decks we have been called on to repairmor decksmof friends that we did not build.

    #383159

    My builder did not use deck piers but instead dug footings. He didn’t dig deep enough to get below the frost line. We are in the middle of rebuilding a large corner section of the deck right now.

    #383163
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Good information, Kurt. I can see a couple of mistakes I’m guilty of.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #383181
    Rob
    Pro
    Birmingham, Alabama

    That was a nice review.

    #383182
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Sigh, makes me want to tear down my deck and redo the whole thing, so many corner cutting by the builder. Oh well, maybe next time it needs painting I might as well just do that.

    #383192
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I found this article on the top 10 deck failures and thought I would share it.

    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/articles/top-10-deck-building-mistakes.aspx

    With all of the deck failures we see, I thought it was good information. Imhace seen a lot of these items on decks we have been called on to repairmor decksmof friends that we did not build.



    @kurt
    @welkerhomes.com,

    Great article there Kirt. I was thinking, all aspects of my deck were built to code until I got to No. 10.
    If memory serves me, I overlapped my beam splices. Heck too late now the deck has been standing for 16 yrs with no noticeable shifting.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #383261
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    @58Chev

    #10 is not altogether true as per the pics. Any good carp will never splice two boards over one post. Many a great discussion has happened. But 1/4 point splices are quite acceptable if done right.

    #383271

    Sorry for the slight hijack, but anyone ever use techno-piers/helical piles instead of sonotubes? I just heard of them for the first time today as a suggestion for footing for a shed

    #383275
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Sadly, I am pretty sure that I have seen all those mistakes. It is a toss up to which one I see more often, improper ledger connection or improper rail post connections…

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #383280
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Sadly, I am pretty sure that I have seen all those mistakes. It is a toss up to which one I see more often, improper ledger connection or improper rail post connections…

    I’d say post to beam connections is the mistake that I see the most. Aside from that, there is a bunch of shoddy work in general out there.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #383296
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    I found this article on the top 10 deck failures and thought I would share it.

    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/articles/top-10-deck-building-mistakes.aspx

    With all of the deck failures we see, I thought it was good information.

    Interesting article, thank you. On the intro picture and number 8, the picture was taken at a rakish angle (to exaggerate?). The deck and the vertical support are close to 90 degrees, though the concrete is, indeed, off.

    From someone who is not involved in decks, I have to wonder how some of the requirements came about. One time events? Trade involvement?

    Others make sense, such as the overspanning on diagonals. While they reference composite decking, it remains the same for wood on a diagonal – the distance is farther than if it were straight across.

    I liked the comment on #1 -“A new continuous handrail, albeit an unsightly one, had to be added. ” 🙂

    #5 requirement for ‘Code allows a maximum variation of only 3⁄8 in. between riser heights.’ seems excessive to me, but there was a good explanation for the common mistake people make in actually achieving this.

    # 10 on beam splicing defies all logic.

    Good thing I don’t do this for a living!

    Thanks again for the link.

    Attachments:
    #383298
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Sorry for the slight hijack, but anyone ever use techno-piers/helical piles instead of sonotubes? I just heard of them for the first time today as a suggestion for footing for a shed

    I looked into them a few years back. The cost was like double or triple what it would cost to hire a good post hole contractor to do the job with concrete poured and saddles set. They are nice quick and cleaner though.

    #383310
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    #5 requirement for ‘Code allows a maximum variation of only 3⁄8 in. between riser heights.’ seems excessive to me, but there was a good explanation for the common mistake people make in actually achieving this.

    The 3/8″ difference in riser height requirement is actually pretty easy to meet or beat. I can’t recall the last time I built a set of steps where I couldn’t get my riser heights equal or real close.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #383327
    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    Around here we have an allowable 6mm (1/4″) discrepancy between risers in one flight, and I think an allowable variance of up to 12mm (1/2″) between flights….but I’m not certain on that one.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #383384
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Around here we have an allowable 6mm (1/4″) discrepancy between risers in one flight, and I think an allowable variance of up to 12mm (1/2″) between flights….but I’m not certain on that one.

    I tore out a stair case that had a maximum variance if 1 1/2″!. It was built poorly also…it wasn’t difficult to convince the owner to trash the whole thing.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #383431
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    #5 requirement for ‘Code allows a maximum variation of only 3⁄8 in. between riser heights.’ seems excessive to me, but there was a good explanation for the common mistake people make in actually achieving this.

    The 3/8″ difference in riser height requirement is actually pretty easy to meet or beat. I can’t recall the last time I built a set of steps where I couldn’t get my riser heights equal or real close.

    Not that with a tape measure and square or simple template it would be hard to meet or beat – it’s that it’s in the Code at all. Maybe it’s from kids running down stairs three at a time? I can see where someone may want a stairway to change riser heights of their stairs by design, not by slop of the carpenter. Makes for a good back-up burglar alarm if you do it enough.

    The last apartment my kid was in was interesting. Only his heel fit on the tread of the stairs inside the apartment. Granted, he wears size 14s, but my wife noticed they were narrow too.

    Got to thinking on the ‘continuous railing’ thing. It could prevent injuries – with people wanting to slide down the rail.
    It seems that I’ve seen railings with a U shape design periodically in them. I guess that would meet the ‘continuous’ requirement, but is it any safer or less safe than what’s shown in the article where the post extends through?

    #383433
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Got to thinking on the ‘continuous railing’ thing. It could prevent injuries – with people wanting to slide down the rail.
    It seems that I’ve seen railings with a U shape design periodically in them. I guess that would meet the ‘continuous’ requirement, but is it any safer or less safe than what’s shown in the article where the post extends through?

    I personally don’t believe that the post breaking the run is a big deal. The biggest issue I see in my area with handrails is size. Out here in the land of little to no code enforcement I have seen a lot of 2×4 hand rails – a 2×4 doesn’t quite meet the grasp-able requirement of code….

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #383441
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    i’ll have to keep this in mind, as my deck is getting old and rotting through. I’ve already had to replace a board. Perhaps i should go with that new plastic so it never rots.

    #383494
    Doobie
    Moderator

    i’ll have to keep this in mind, as my deck is getting old and rotting through. I’ve already had to replace a board. Perhaps i should go with that new plastic so it never rots.

    There are a host of disadvantages with them depending on which ones you go with. None are perfect. I prefer wood.

    #383501
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Got to thinking on the ‘continuous railing’ thing. It could prevent injuries – with people wanting to slide down the rail.
    It seems that I’ve seen railings with a U shape design periodically in them. I guess that would meet the ‘continuous’ requirement, but is it any safer or less safe than what’s shown in the article where the post extends through?

    I personally don’t believe that the post breaking the run is a big deal. The biggest issue I see in my area with handrails is size. Out here in the land of little to no code enforcement I have seen a lot of 2×4 hand rails – a 2×4 doesn’t quite meet the grasp-able requirement of code….

    A plain 2×4 will fail every time here. My local inspectors want the handrail to be profiled to fit a hand. There needs to be material removed from both the inside and outside to allow someone to grip the rail even if they are falling. A regular 2×4 from the yard has straight sides and can be easily ripped out of your hand…add the detail they are asking for, and you’ll have much better grip.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 134 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.375 seconds