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Ddh183

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 71 total)
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  • #572851
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Yeah I am with you on milwaukees quality. I rather buy a quality drill one that wont fall apart. But they do have a good warranty and the power is there

    #572900
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Yeah I am with you on milwaukees quality. I rather buy a quality drill one that wont fall apart. But they do have a good warranty and the power is there

    Rather have a tool that works than have to deal with warranty delays/inconvenience.

    #572931
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Bosch’s NA site doesn’t make distinction between stall torque and running torque, so what you see is higher of the two which is stall torque. Their UK site lists both and it’s actually quite interesting.

    The brushed brute tough drill has 85 / 42 Nm of torque, whereas the brushless has 75 / 47 Nm. So while you have less stall torque, there’s more running torque. Less impressive on paper, but more useful in reality.

    #572977
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    What exactly is stall torque

    #573010
    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    @doobie I agree you on milwaukee drills they burn even though I didn’t have one. my friend has some and he’s saying had some problem he got in to bosch line I have the dds182 and hds 182 I believe one hammer and one without hammer drill both brushless. Never had problem with any of my tools except that 1380 slim recall.and one idh181 which was refurbished and got some use out of it. Other then that they all look and work like new

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #573028
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Bosch’s NA site doesn’t make distinction between stall torque and running torque, so what you see is higher of the two which is stall torque. Their UK site lists both and it’s actually quite interesting.

    The brushed brute tough drill has 85 / 42 Nm of torque, whereas the brushless has 75 / 47 Nm. So while you have less stall torque, there’s more running torque. Less impressive on paper, but more useful in reality.

    I might be learning something new here. Never knew these torque distinctions. Could you link to one of the comparable Bosch Euro/UK tools mentioned here in this thread and its related NA model # @jzmtl? Bosch has so many drils, I wouldn’t know where to start, and if you know your way easily around there, it would greatly be appreciated.

    I also wonder how honest/accurate and comparable these ratings are from one manufacturer to another. I learned years ago about how the HP ratings on some tools like vacs for example was largely a bunch of Malarkey. Is it the same maybe with these drill ratings between one manufacturer and another? I honestly don’t know.

    At more than a dozen drills now with Bosch I’ve aquired since last year, I’m comfortable within their rating system and using their tools I am getting what I expect from them. Comparing to competitors for me is not something I need to know, but I am curious.

    #573123
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    What exactly is stall torque

    It is the torque generated right before the unit stalls out. Think of it as peak torque. Running torque would be the torque generated on a consistent basis. Stall torque would only come into play right before the unit stalled out.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #573210
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Bosch’s NA site doesn’t make distinction between stall torque and running torque, so what you see is higher of the two which is stall torque. Their UK site lists both and it’s actually quite interesting.

    The brushed brute tough drill has 85 / 42 Nm of torque, whereas the brushless has 75 / 47 Nm. So while you have less stall torque, there’s more running torque. Less impressive on paper, but more useful in reality.

    I might be learning something new here. Never knew these torque distinctions. Could you link to one of the comparable Bosch Euro/UK tools mentioned here in this thread and its related NA model # @jzmtl? Bosch has so many drils, I wouldn’t know where to start, and if you know your way easily around there, it would greatly be appreciated.

    I also wonder how honest/accurate and comparable these ratings are from one manufacturer to another. I learned years ago about how the HP ratings on some tools like vacs for example was largely a bunch of Malarkey. Is it the same maybe with these drill ratings between one manufacturer and another? I honestly don’t know.

    At more than a dozen drills now with Bosch I’ve aquired since last year, I’m comfortable within their rating system and using their tools I am getting what I expect from them. Comparing to competitors for me is not something I need to know, but I am curious.

    I don’t know the model number equivalent either lol, I just look at the photos and figure out which is which.

    Here’s HDH181, https://shop.bosch-professional.com/gb/en/product/cordless-combi-gsb-18-ve-2-li–34754

    HDH183: https://shop.bosch-professional.com/gb/en/product/cordless-combi-gsb-18-ve-ec–39505

    Look under technical data section.

    #573214
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    What exactly is stall torque

    Electrical motors different from internal combustion engines in that they have a constant horsepower output. Since power is a product of torque and RPM, when you have a fixed output, torque goes down as RPM goes up, and it’s the highest when the motor is at 0 RPM. It can be a big number, but doesn’t help you drill a hole when it’s not turning. All the torque number you see here in North America is that. I don’t know how Bosch calculate their running torque exactly but at least you can compare different Bosch models with it.

    #573244

    I definitely want the newer HDS183

    #573450
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Bosch’s NA site doesn’t make distinction between stall torque and running torque, so what you see is higher of the two which is stall torque. Their UK site lists both and it’s actually quite interesting.

    The brushed brute tough drill has 85 / 42 Nm of torque, whereas the brushless has 75 / 47 Nm. So while you have less stall torque, there’s more running torque. Less impressive on paper, but more useful in reality.

    I might be learning something new here. Never knew these torque distinctions. Could you link to one of the comparable Bosch Euro/UK tools mentioned here in this thread and its related NA model # @jzmtl? Bosch has so many drils, I wouldn’t know where to start, and if you know your way easily around there, it would greatly be appreciated.

    I also wonder how honest/accurate and comparable these ratings are from one manufacturer to another. I learned years ago about how the HP ratings on some tools like vacs for example was largely a bunch of Malarkey. Is it the same maybe with these drill ratings between one manufacturer and another? I honestly don’t know.

    At more than a dozen drills now with Bosch I’ve aquired since last year, I’m comfortable within their rating system and using their tools I am getting what I expect from them. Comparing to competitors for me is not something I need to know, but I am curious.

    I don’t know the model number equivalent either lol, I just look at the photos and figure out which is which.

    Here’s HDH181, https://shop.bosch-professional.com/gb/en/product/cordless-combi-gsb-18-ve-2-li–34754

    HDH183: https://shop.bosch-professional.com/gb/en/product/cordless-combi-gsb-18-ve-ec–39505

    Look under technical data section.

    I think you got them. Thanks!

    Man, do they ever have way more info on their tools over there. Some of the specs stuff, I don’t even understand.

    #573553
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Man, do they ever have way more info on their tools over there.

    They sure do, very nice product pages.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #573736
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    I think they have a lot more regulation than we do so that’s why all the NVH data has to be provided.

    #573747
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I think they have a lot more regulation than we do so that’s why all the NVH data has to be provided.

    What does NHV stand for?

    #573760

    https://youtu.be/GG_KNNAUhwc boschs new brushless drills @madman_us

    Thanks for linking the clip here . I always enjoy learning about new Bosch drills .

    Always willing to learn .

    #573772
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    I think they have a lot more regulation than we do so that’s why all the NVH data has to be provided.

    What does NHV stand for?

    Noise, Vibration and Harshness. Basically how loud and jumpy it is.

    #573803
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I think they have a lot more regulation than we do so that’s why all the NVH data has to be provided.

    What does NHV stand for?

    Noise, Vibration and Harshness. Basically how loud and jumpy it is.

    Never heard of that. Is that mandated by authorities?

    #573809
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    I think they have a lot more regulation than we do so that’s why all the NVH data has to be provided.

    What does NHV stand for?

    Noise, Vibration and Harshness. Basically how loud and jumpy it is.

    Never heard of that. Is that mandated by authorities?

    Not here definitely, maybe in Europe.

    #573827
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I think they have a lot more regulation than we do so that’s why all the NVH data has to be provided.

    What does NHV stand for?

    Noise, Vibration and Harshness. Basically how loud and jumpy it is.

    Never heard of that. Is that mandated by authorities?

    Not here definitely, maybe in Europe.

    Actually, it may be something similar, but NVH seems to be related to automotive testing and not power tools.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise,_vibration,_and_harshness

    Nevertheless I assume these types of specs/ratings is to inform the user of how torturous one tool is from another. Whether it’s a mandated thing or not, I don’t know, but I could see it being so. Those kinds of specs could be important to some people.

    Maybe we should have that over here and there would be less people with musculoskeletal disorders out there, or at least people can make better decisions to protect themselves.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musculoskeletal_disorder

    #573988
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    For all day use of a tool NVH would be a factor. You want tools that are smooth running and as quiet as possible. Air tools are anything but NVH friendly.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 71 total)
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