dcsimg

Cutting Laminate Flooring

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 120 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #12896
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    What is everyone’s preferred tool for cutting laminate flooring?

    I’ve used my portable table saw and cross-cut sled with good results but sometimes the dust is an issue. Do the laminate flooring cutters work well? I don’t do a lot of flooring so I’ve never tried one of the cutters.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #12902
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    We use one of the shears with good results. When we need to rip a piece or make a cut that the shear cannot, I use a fiberer coment blade in the tablr saw. It does not dull quickly like a standard carbide. The shear is great for keeping dow the dust.

    #12908
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Good to know that the shear works well. What kind of cut quality does the fiber cement blade give?

    I’ve been using 7-1/4″ circular saw blades in the table saw when I work with laminate. I get the blades on sale at Home Hardware every now and then for between $2.50 and $3.00. Once the blades gets dull I throw it away and put a new one in. For that price you couldn’t get the blade sharpened.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #12913
    pgc555
    Pro
    Gilberts, Illinois

    The laminate guillotine type cutters do work fine. They keep dust to a minimum inside the house. You can cut corners out of pieces ( when you get used to it ) I bought an inexpensive one for about $40 and
    have used it many times! When you have to rip the material the full length of a piece ( 4′ ) you may need to use a table saw or circular saw – go outside if you can to keep down dust.

    #12919
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    phils right, the guillotine makes zero dust which is great for straight runs.. you only need a saw for notching around corners and what not. you just need to make sure the guiotine blade is sharp as it gets dull it compresses the flooring and doesnt make a clean cut.

    for a saw i just use the jigsaw and cut from the bottom using up cut blades

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #13018
    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    Those sheers are nice. I don’t do enough flooring to justify one, but have some friends that have them, and they work very well. Install time goes much faster also. Phil, where did you find one for $40?

    #13043
    pgc555
    Pro
    Gilberts, Illinois

    I will be getting an opportunity to use this
    http://webapps.easy2.com/cm_mvc/GenericIndex?page_id=35977788
    on my next 500 sq.ft engineered wood floor. i will let you know my thoughts – but I can already see -I’m going to love this tool!

    #37735

    @Phil Green: So, it’s been a while. How’s the tool work out for the job you did??? Inquiring minds want to know!

    #37756
    redwood
    Pro

    I’m late to the party, but I have a Skil flooring saw that actually works great and is pretty inexpensive. It rips, cuts 90 deg. or angles. It is very light and portable and has decent dust pickup.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #37759
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    I set my miter saw and portable table saw up outside and make my cuts. Laminate will eat a blade in each saw during a big job.

    #37761

    Glad to hear Mark and Phil Green are using that skil saw. I was wondering if anyone was using it for flooring – it is certainly perfect for the application. How is it holding up to use? Will it have a long life?

    John S

    #37777
    redwood
    Pro

    I don’t do a ton of flooring, a couple of jobs a year, but it has held up just fine. I’ve had mine for about 5 years. You do go through blades with laminate flooring, but they are reasonable, since it’s such a small saw.

    At around $100, I figure I’ve already gotten plenty of use out of it. It almost seems like a toy, but it really does a good job.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #37783
    pgc555
    Pro
    Gilberts, Illinois

    Sorry for the late response. First off the guillotine cutter for $40 was bought from my local Menards.
    Second, the Skil saw worked fine on the maple flooring I had. To be honest, the only problem I saw with the saw was on “L” cuts, the blade guard is solid. You can’t see the blade to know when to stop the cut st the corner. I did some test pieces and made my owm mark on the saw as a reference. If the saw blade guard was made of a “see through” material you would be able to see the blade better on these type cuts. Over all I liked the saw and will use it again on hardwood installs. As for laminate, I think I’ll stay with my no dust tool for that? Just being honest.

    #38770
    Str8Wood_MKE
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    Phil, you may want to consider compressed bamboo. The stuff is really tough. I was thinking of installing it in my home, but it’s a little on the expensive side.

    http://www.calibamboo.com/

    I think you can request samples for free.

    #38771
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Ryan, This compressed bamboo looks very interesting. I think I will request a sample. I am looking to do my kitchen and screen porch.

    #38779
    pgc555
    Pro
    Gilberts, Illinois

    I have installed many sq.ft.of Bamboo. It IS VERY tough stuff. Go through blades per job. The Skil Saw would cut it.

    #38782
    redwood
    Pro

    Cali Bamboo has decking products as well, I havn’t heard good things.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #40983

    @PhilGreen: thanks for the update! I can see where a transparent guard would have been a plus for L cuts. Cutting blind doesn’t always go very well for me.

    #61353
    MRenes
    Pro
    Vienna, Missouri

    I just use a miter saw and table saw, I’ve had no problems with using them. But It seems that that skil saw would be pretty handy due to the size of it especially if you can have it indoors next to the site.

    #70236
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    I don’t have a cool flooring saw, so I use what I have on hand. Depending on the length of the cut, I’ll either use a jigsaw or a circular saw. However, for small pieces and odd-shaped cuts, I like using my oscillating multii-tool. It does a great job in getting perfect cuts where it count.

    Pat

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 120 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
queries. 0.562 seconds