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Cutting 1.5 inch square steel tubing

This topic contains 47 replies, has 21 voices, and was last updated by  georgenelson 1 year, 12 months ago.

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  • #412103

    I need to repair some sections of my fence that has rusted out. The bottom is 1.5 inch steel tubing and it has 5/8 inch square pickets. I was planning on cutting out the rusted sections (a few 4-5 inch sections) and then epoxying a new piece in. Since this is not really structural I figured this would work, but I could also weld the piece in if necessary.

    My question is on cutting it. Obviously a grinder would work, but a few areas are tight to the concrete footer and I cannot get the grinder in there. What other tool would you use? Maybe an OMT or reciprocating saw?

    Appreciate any recomnendations. I want to get as straight of cut as possible if splicing in a new piece and I really do not want to replace 4 foot sctions of fence as that can add up quickly and matching the existing design would be tough.

    Thanks

    Orange County, CA

    #412116

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    MTJ the reciprocating saw with the metal cutting blade should work fine> that’s the first tool I get on it.
    If it were in the wide oped space I’d go with the5 3/8″ metal cutting saw but sounds like it would fit in there.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #412120

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Portable bandsaw? Otherwise I think the best option is the sawzall.

    #412131

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I agree on the sawzall. But how shaky/solid is it to cut? Could be a jumpy mess.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #412152

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Yh definitely the portable bandsaw. It’ll be the best cut.

    #412160

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Sounds like no room for a portable bandsaw.
    Sawzall would be your best bet for the tight spots.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #412166

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    MTJ the reciprocating saw with the metal cutting blade should work fine> that’s the first tool I get on it.

    I agree it is the main reason the recip saw was developed to get into tight places and cut through anything. They make long 12″ and 15″ blades if you need more access.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #412182

    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    If it’s not heavy gauge, an old trusty hacksaw may do it

    --Steve

    #412185

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    A sawzall is not going to make pretty cuts. But may be the best choice in this situation.
    I wonder if you might be able to use a grinder with a cutting blade for the bottom cut or the sawzall. And a jigsaw with a metal blade for the rest.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #412187

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The reciprocating saw with the new Freud Carbide Steel cutting blades do wonders.

    WE also use a small grinder, Metal cutting skillsaw or a port o ban.

    The OMT with the carbide blades would work fine also.

    #412235

    Thanks, guys. I can get access with a grinder for a couple cuts, but a few have no clearance so need a plan b. Will try the recipient and omt and see how it goes. I have enough stock for a few practice runs before committing to the real thing. Lucky it is on the bottom so if I end up making a real mess if things it will not be the end if world as it will be somewhat hidden.

    Orange County, CA

    #412242

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Yeah if you can, a portable band saw would probably make the least vibration, but a jig saw and or sawzal would be next. , if you have the place and the tools, the metal cutting circ saw would be great.

    #412284

    If it’s not heavy gauge, an old trusty hacksaw may do it

    Hacksaw or framesaw would be my choice

    Depending on how thick of course

    Omt would cost a fortune in blades probably.

    Wire saw is also a good choice, if you have one.

    #418459

    lulu
    Pro

    a recip saw would work. but a cutting torch would be a whole lot better. if you use a recip saw a LENOX GOLD blade works really well.

    Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle.
    Michael Angelo

    #418493

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    This little saw is a gem for things like that!
    In the pic is 5/16 steel.

    Attachments:

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #418536

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Depending on how thick of course

    Omt would cost a fortune in blades probably.

    Bosch/Dremel carbide teeth (not grit) blade should be able to handle it easily. Regular bimetal might survive a nail or two but won’t last nearly long enough for something that size.

    #418537

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    This little saw is a gem for things like that!
    In the pic is 5/16 steel.

    thats pretty amazing, i’ve never thought about cutting steel with a circular saw, how different is it from cutting wood? what is the feedback like?

    #418617

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    This little saw is a gem for things like that!
    In the pic is 5/16 steel.

    Wow nice that it will cut a 5/16″ piece of solid steel.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #418619

    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    This little saw is a gem for things like that!
    In the pic is 5/16 steel.

    thats pretty amazing, i’ve never thought about cutting steel with a circular saw, how different is it from cutting wood? what is the feedback like?

    I think that’s the metal cutting saw… looks like it handles that steel with no problem. @dirtywhiteboy how does it do with the sparks and hot slivers?

    --Steve

    #418667

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Probably a 30 second job with a Sawzall. That what those things are made for.

    Sawzalls don’t have to cut sloppy. You can get quite good cuts with one. The new Freud metal-cutting blades are really nice, as are Milwaukee blades.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

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