dcsimg

Curve or straight claw hammer what you use

This topic contains 157 replies, has 54 voices, and was last updated by  brianpeters 2 years ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 121 through 140 (of 158 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #478973

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It’s nice you found the good hammer when you’re still young.

    Nice picture of your Stiletto hammers Dirty. What is the main advantage to their design?

    I got my first one when my elbow was being retarded.
    On average, Titanium provides approximately 10 times greater damping than high carbon steels. In this context, damping is a measure of the ability
    of a “material to quell vibration.” cushion the blow and reduce recoil with a Titanium hammer. When a hammer hits a rigid work object, shock waves are generated which multiply in the head of the hammer and create a swinging momentum in the handle. Our studies indicated that the first shock wave is the one that
    most needs cushioning. Subsequent vibrations are absorbed by the handle and the soft parts of the palm, and we have found no research data to indicate any harmful effects from these. However, the most dramatic effect of the blow is when the hammer bounces back, rotates around its own center of gravity and generates a recoil force. This force is compensated for by muscle activity in the forearm muscles, thereby stretching the tendons. Cushioning the initial shock wave and reducing recoil places less strain on the muscles and tendons, and also gives the user more control over the next blow.

    Here’s more in a PDF,,,
    https://www.stiletto.com/Images/FAQ/Hultafors%20Document.pdf

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #479088

    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    It’s nice you found the good hammer when you’re still young.

    Nice picture of your Stiletto hammers Dirty. What is the main advantage to their design?

    I got my first one when my elbow was being retarded.
    On average, Titanium provides approximately 10 times greater damping than high carbon steels. In this context, damping is a measure of the ability
    of a “material to quell vibration.” cushion the blow and reduce recoil with a Titanium hammer. When a hammer hits a rigid work object, shock waves are generated which multiply in the head of the hammer and create a swinging momentum in the handle. Our studies indicated that the first shock wave is the one that
    most needs cushioning. Subsequent vibrations are absorbed by the handle and the soft parts of the palm, and we have found no research data to indicate any harmful effects from these. However, the most dramatic effect of the blow is when the hammer bounces back, rotates around its own center of gravity and generates a recoil force. This force is compensated for by muscle activity in the forearm muscles, thereby stretching the tendons. Cushioning the initial shock wave and reducing recoil places less strain on the muscles and tendons, and also gives the user more control over the next blow.

    Here’s more in a PDF,,,
    https://www.stiletto.com/Images/FAQ/Hultafors%20Document.pdf

    Dirty, thanks for posting that link. It’s true. Before I got my Stiletto I had bad pain in my wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Once I got the Stiletto the pain went away (not instantly of course, it took a few months, but it went away and has stayed away).

    #479102

    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    I do have a curved claw 16oz.hickory handled Craftsman hammer, I bought it more for sentimental reasons as it’s identical to the first hammer I ever bought. I rarely use it though. Some have said curved claw are better for pulling nails? Maybe in an ideal situation, but for me so often the nail I need to pull is impossible to get hold of with a curved claw.

    Only advantage I can see of a curved claw is a slight safety advantage, but who hits themselves in the face anyway?

    Edit: My dad tells me a curved claw hammer was better for trim carpenters nailing in tight spots, of course nowadays trim is seldom hand nailed.

    #479130

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I never ever have needed a curved claw hammer. If Im pulling a nail with my straight fiberglass Stanley hammer…..I DIG IN, BEND SIDEWAYS not front to back. It puts a kink in the nail and allows you to pry without stripping up the length of the nail.
    If its real stubborn I ratchet it out by bending sideways.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #479489

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I never ever have needed a curved claw hammer. If Im pulling a nail with my straight fiberglass Stanley hammer…..I DIG IN, BEND SIDEWAYS not front to back. It puts a kink in the nail and allows you to pry without stripping up the length of the nail.
    If its real stubborn I ratchet it out by bending sideways.

    Great point on how to pull a nail. This way keeps from breaking the handle.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #479496

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Gracias my hammer is an extension of my arm at this point

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #484916

    I never ever have needed a curved claw hammer. If Im pulling a nail with my straight fiberglass Stanley hammer…..I DIG IN, BEND SIDEWAYS not front to back. It puts a kink in the nail and allows you to pry without stripping up the length of the nail.
    If its real stubborn I ratchet it out by bending sideways.

    That’s a good point . But on molding and soft material that method would dig into much . The curve hammer gets better point or a pair or pliers .

    Always willing to learn .

    #484941

    I have a Mastercraft Fence pliers for pulling nails cleanly – much faster when there are a bunch to do.
    http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/tools-hardware/pliers-snips/specialty-pliers/mastercraft-fencing-pliers-0584583p.html?utm_campaign=bazaarvoice&utm_medium=SearchVoice&utm_source=RatingsAndReviews&utm_content=Default

    I have both a curved and straight claw hammer, at different weights, but I tend to reach for my heavy straight claw – just feels right in the hand. Has a gimmicky nail-holding magnet on the top of the face, but Ive never used it

    #485060

    yellaD
    Pro

    It’s nice you found the good hammer when you’re still young.

    Nice picture of your Stiletto hammers Dirty. What is the main advantage to their design?

    I got my first one when my elbow was being retarded.
    On average, Titanium provides approximately 10 times greater damping than high carbon steels. In this context, damping is a measure of the ability
    of a “material to quell vibration.” cushion the blow and reduce recoil with a Titanium hammer. When a hammer hits a rigid work object, shock waves are generated which multiply in the head of the hammer and create a swinging momentum in the handle. Our studies indicated that the first shock wave is the one that
    most needs cushioning. Subsequent vibrations are absorbed by the handle and the soft parts of the palm, and we have found no research data to indicate any harmful effects from these. However, the most dramatic effect of the blow is when the hammer bounces back, rotates around its own center of gravity and generates a recoil force. This force is compensated for by muscle activity in the forearm muscles, thereby stretching the tendons. Cushioning the initial shock wave and reducing recoil places less strain on the muscles and tendons, and also gives the user more control over the next blow.

    Here’s more in a PDF,,,
    https://www.stiletto.com/Images/FAQ/Hultafors%20Document.pdf

    Makes sense, DWB. Does a “quality” hammer also include how well they pull out nails? Aside from the sidways technique mentioned above?

    #485264

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Dirty, thanks for posting that link. It’s true.

    Now that I am a bit older I should look into a Stiletto hammer to prevent injury.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #485465

    I have a Mastercraft Fence pliers for pulling nails cleanly – much faster when there are a bunch to do.
    http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/tools-hardware/pliers-snips/specialty-pliers/mastercraft-fencing-pliers-0584583p.html?utm_campaign=bazaarvoice&utm_medium=SearchVoice&utm_source=RatingsAndReviews&utm_content=Default

    I have both a curved and straight claw hammer, at different weights, but I tend to reach for my heavy straight claw – just feels right in the hand. Has a gimmicky nail-holding magnet on the top of the face, but Ive never used it

    Never would of thought to use that fence pliers .

    Always willing to learn .

    #485487

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I prefer a straight claw hammer as I’ve found them easier to use. I also like using a cat’s paw to pull sunk nails. I also like the “wonderbar”. I use these two way more for pulling nails during demos rather than my hammer.

    #485562

    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    I never thought I would buy a curved claw, but I did a few days ago. I’ve been doing some shop work lately and all I had was a very small 8oz hammer and a 22oz framer, nothing in between. So I picked up a 12oz Estwing curved claw. It’s a nice hammer for what I’ll use it for.

    #496483

    Fiskars who makes hand tools for over 20 years . Is making a line of hammers with vibration and shock control built into it. It will come in 16,20,22 ounce hammers . They are claiming that it has four times less the vibration of a wooden-handled hammer .

    Attachments:

    Always willing to learn .

    #496511

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    It’s nice you found the good hammer when you’re still young.

    Nice picture of your Stiletto hammers Dirty. What is the main advantage to their design?

    I got my first one when my elbow was being retarded.
    On average, Titanium provides approximately 10 times greater damping than high carbon steels. In this context, damping is a measure of the ability
    of a “material to quell vibration.” cushion the blow and reduce recoil with a Titanium hammer. When a hammer hits a rigid work object, shock waves are generated which multiply in the head of the hammer and create a swinging momentum in the handle. Our studies indicated that the first shock wave is the one that
    most needs cushioning. Subsequent vibrations are absorbed by the handle and the soft parts of the palm, and we have found no research data to indicate any harmful effects from these. However, the most dramatic effect of the blow is when the hammer bounces back, rotates around its own center of gravity and generates a recoil force. This force is compensated for by muscle activity in the forearm muscles, thereby stretching the tendons. Cushioning the initial shock wave and reducing recoil places less strain on the muscles and tendons, and also gives the user more control over the next blow.

    Here’s more in a PDF,,,
    https://www.stiletto.com/Images/FAQ/Hultafors%20Document.pdf

    Makes sense, DWB. Does a “quality” hammer also include how well they pull out nails? Aside from the sidways technique mentioned above?

    The side nail puller is one thing that I can’t imagine not having anymore.

    #496667

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Fiskars who makes hand tools for over 20 years . Is making a line of hammers with vibration and shock control built into it.

    Very interesting hammer design. Thank you for the info.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #496908

    Not sure we’re they we be sold at @theamcguy . I’m thinking Home Depot or throw there onlinesite if you want try one out .

    Always willing to learn .

    #496968

    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    14 is dewalt mig straight claw as my daily use hammer. 14oz straight claw wood handled stiletto for framing

    #496972

    Fiskars who makes hand tools for over 20 years . Is making a line of hammers with vibration and shock control built into it. It will come in 16,20,22 ounce hammers . They are claiming that it has four times less the vibration of a wooden-handled hammer .

    I bet it is. I have their wood chopping axe and it is very high tech and no vibration. Think moving to a modern baseball bat from and old wood one with no tape

    #497266

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Not sure we’re they we be sold at @theamcguy . I’m thinking Home Depot or throw there onlinesite if you want try one out .

    I’ll have to keep my eye out for them to be sure. I really like their scissors they are quality tools.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

Viewing 20 posts - 121 through 140 (of 158 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 1.394 seconds