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Curve or straight claw hammer what you use

This topic contains 157 replies, has 54 voices, and was last updated by  brianpeters 2 years ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 101 through 120 (of 158 total)
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  • #475712

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I will often use my putty knife between the wood and the end cutters as to not damage the wood as I pull. A thin piece of wood would work also.

    #475723

    I have an estwing framing hammer with straight claws, a smaller regular estwing with curved. There is an old wood handled one on the wall that belonged to my dad and is probably older than I am.

    2 tack hammers, a ball peen hammer, a big cross peen hammer, a rubber mallet, a wooden mallet, and a carving mallet that I made by sticking a length of a small birch branch into a hole of a piece of larger birch branch (it is in a lot of my vidoes). I also have a long handled sledge hammer. That about covers it. No claws on these, but you get a variety of them over the years.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #475735

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    Straight claw all the way. I use my stiletto for almost everything. Whatever it doesnt do one of my persuaders does.

    #475797

    Clev08
    Pro

    I have straight claw in my pouches that I use daily. I have a curved claw in my trunk but.i can’t remember the last time I got it out.
    @woodsconstruction are stiletto’s worth the cost? And what makes them better in your opinion. I’ve never seen one in person to know much about them.

    #475805

    Anonymous

    As an electrician, straight only. I don’t use the claw very much at all, but when I do, it’s not for pulling nails.

    #475892

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    @clev08 For me they are 100% worth the price. I never liked Estwings (personal preference) and broke the handles on 2 Stanly Fatmax hammers a few years back so I sprung on my first Stiletto. They shipped me the wrong one but I didn’t feel like exchanging and they were the same price so I used the Mini 14 for a few months, then ordered another TBI2 and have been using it for the past 3.5 years. No issues, changed the face once.

    As far as I’m concerned Id rather pay the price for a quality tool especially since I’m young and have a long road of swinging a hammer ahead of me.

    #475901

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    End cutters are my go-to for pulling as well, they are the ones that leave the least blemishes on the work.

    I usually go for my ChannelLock side cutters also, especially if it’s finishing nails that need to be pulled.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #475947

    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    I have two Estwing brick hammers, one wooden handle brick hammer and a cheaper Stanley claw hammer that I should replace. I only have to pull out the Stanley once and awhile as it’s not common to me use nails everyday with masonry. Tapcons and screws are a different story.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #475963

    lulu
    Pro

    i use a straight claw. I don’t own a curved because I don’t like them. they seem awkward to use.

    Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle.
    Michael Angelo

    #475969

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I use my curved claw hammer around the shop most of the time. All my straight claw hammers are 20 oz plus, so they are just too heavy for light shop work.

    This is what I use for pulling nails. Mind you I do mostly cabinet work.
    Also works great for pulling staples. Just get a grip and rock the pliers and out she comes.

    End cutters are my go-to for pulling as well, they are the ones that leave the least blemishes on the work.

    I use this one to pull trim nails and small stuff.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #476009

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I use my curved claw hammer around the shop most of the time. All my straight claw hammers are 20 oz plus, so they are just too heavy for light shop work.

    This is what I use for pulling nails. Mind you I do mostly cabinet work.
    Also works great for pulling staples. Just get a grip and rock the pliers and out she comes.

    End cutters are my go-to for pulling as well, they are the ones that leave the least blemishes on the work.

    I use this one to pull trim nails and small stuff.

    Those work really well. I have pulled a lot of neails over the years, and that is what I ended up with.

    #476011

    This is what I use for pulling nails. Mind you I do mostly cabinet work.
    Also works great for pulling staples. Just get a grip and rock the pliers and out she comes.
    Since my plumb 20 oz is 30 years old and has a smooth face I question you on that @whitehill .

    I use these all the time to pull nails out of reclaimed wood or to snip a finish nail on a birdhouse when they pop out .It is a very important tool for what I do .

    I have a newer smaller one like that an this old hand-me-down that really works well. I’ve pulled a lot of nails and such with it over the years.

    That looks like the ones used to pull shoes off horses. They can get a good grip on the nail with that, and since the head is flat and long it works out well

    Maybe it is. It’s possibly around 50 years old, so I don’t know for sure.

    They work really well for finish nails or headless nails that a lot of hammers wont pull .

    It is a great tool. Years ago I thought I lost it after bringing it somehwere to help out with a job. Went missing for quite a while before I found where I had misplaced it. I was so glad when I did find it. Made my day at the time.

    I’ve pulled on that tool pretty hard over the years. Always thought one day it would break on me, but it never has thank goodness. (Knock on wood).

    Still good. They like it because you have to get in flush and get a grip on the nail. Lots of older nails were shaped the same way. And today they still work great at getting a bite at an almost flush level.

    #476138

    Lowes today had kobalt straight hammers and masonry ones on sale for $5.00 dollars in the clearance section . They were the ones with wooden handles and no fiberglass ones .

    That’s a steal! I would pick up 2 or 3 at that price.

    I have to many as it is . I forget half the time were they are and seem to find a new one all the time in a box , bucket etc .

    Lowes today had kobalt straight hammers and masonry ones on sale for $5.00 dollars in the clearance section . They were the ones with wooden handles and no fiberglass ones .

    That was a good deal. How many did you pick up?

    Even at that price I walked bye . Don’t need anymore hammers .

    Always willing to learn .

    #476166

    Clev08
    Pro

    @woodsconstruction thanks for the opinion. Right now I use a cheap Stanley 18 oz, it has worked well for me but when it needs replacing I’ll definitely look into buying a Stiletto!

    #476179

    Doobie
    Pro

    This is what I use for pulling nails. Mind you I do mostly cabinet work.
    Also works great for pulling staples. Just get a grip and rock the pliers and out she comes.
    Since my plumb 20 oz is 30 years old and has a smooth face I question you on that @whitehill .

    I use these all the time to pull nails out of reclaimed wood or to snip a finish nail on a birdhouse when they pop out .It is a very important tool for what I do .

    I have a newer smaller one like that an this old hand-me-down that really works well. I’ve pulled a lot of nails and such with it over the years.

    That looks like the ones used to pull shoes off horses. They can get a good grip on the nail with that, and since the head is flat and long it works out well

    Maybe it is. It’s possibly around 50 years old, so I don’t know for sure.

    They work really well for finish nails or headless nails that a lot of hammers wont pull .

    It is a great tool. Years ago I thought I lost it after bringing it somehwere to help out with a job. Went missing for quite a while before I found where I had misplaced it. I was so glad when I did find it. Made my day at the time.

    I’ve pulled on that tool pretty hard over the years. Always thought one day it would break on me, but it never has thank goodness. (Knock on wood).

    Still good. They like it because you have to get in flush and get a grip on the nail. Lots of older nails were shaped the same way. And today they still work great at getting a bite at an almost flush level.

    The key with that old tool is the grabbing mouth never goes dull. It’s made of some space age metal in its day that has never deformed. Probably why the handles have never broken. Go figure.

    #476227

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I usually go for my ChannelLock side cutters also, especially if it’s finishing nails that need to be pulled.

    Sounds like a mechanic. Me too go for a pair of side cutters, grabs and pulls just fine.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #476258

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    @clev08 I Think you’ll be pleasantly surprised if you go look at them. The lack of weight takes a bit of getting used to but once you get used to it there is no turning back! The side nail puller is great too, although more and more are coming out with a variance of it these days.

    #478385

    For working with wood I go straight claw every time. But I find my self using ball peen hammers more than any others, as I tend to work with metal more often.

    #478601

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    @clev08 For me they are 100% worth the price. I never liked Estwings (personal preference) and broke the handles on 2 Stanly Fatmax hammers a few years back so I sprung on my first Stiletto. They shipped me the wrong one but I didn’t feel like exchanging and they were the same price so I used the Mini 14 for a few months, then ordered another TBI2 and have been using it for the past 3.5 years. No issues, changed the face once.

    As far as I’m concerned Id rather pay the price for a quality tool especially since I’m young and have a long road of swinging a hammer ahead of me.

    It’s nice you found the good hammer when you’re still young.

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    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #478631

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    It’s nice you found the good hammer when you’re still young.

    Nice picture of your Stiletto hammers Dirty. What is the main advantage to their design?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

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