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Cordless Reciprocating Saws

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  • #681272

    You know what I’m talking about… Anyways, all this is to say that if you see and feel and audition and actually try out a cordless reciprocating saw that you genuinely like, and that feels good to you, but that is not a part of your current color of tool system? Buy it ANYWAY. With one charger, and two batteries, that will be all you need. It’ll run long enough to get your job done. Who cares that it doesn’t match your system. If the tool PERFORMS the way you need it to, avail yourself to what works for you.

    Long lasting lithium ion battery chemistry make this possible.

    Some good points. However, I cannot imagine having a cordless sawzall, a cordless hammer drill, a cordless impact driver, and a cordless angle grinder on one simple project and have to rely on 4 different types of chargers and 4 different sets of batteries.

    Will one set of batteries last throughout the day? May be, depends on your specific tasks and how much juice that requires. You may be able to last a day or two driving small screws, but few months ago I was rebuilding a fence that collapsed after Irma, I was driving 4″ long TimberLok screws into PT 4X4s and 4X6s, and a 4ah battery lasts may be slightly over 1 hour, two batteries wouldn’t last a half day without a full charge.

    Also if you have 4 cordless tools and 8 batteries, there are some flexibility here if they are the same brand. If they are four different brands, having one charger not working and having to take it to a repair shop and leave it for a week pretty much makes the tool useless. If they are the same brand, you have no issue.

    Basically, anything that malfunctions whether it’s the battery, the charger, the tool you are out of luck. If you have the same platform, you are only out of luck if the actual tool break. In fact, you probably end up with extra chargers and batteries on a single platform which you can then have the luxury of taking having one at home, two in your truck which allows you to charge two at the same time.

    Additionally, you have the option to expand your tool set by buying just the bare tool.

    Some good points, it’s important to have an extra charger I would think, plus that’s definitely a benefit to have extra batteries.

    #681301
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    I bring plenty batteries with me to the job, but a charger is always in the truck

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    #681302
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I do like the cordless for pruning trees, but for me that is only once or twice a year. Anything that requires more than a few minutes of cutting, and we are grabbing the corded version.

    Add a ladder to the equation…or go up on a roof and I’m happy to leave the cord behind!

    or inside an attic, with only 16″ or less head room, with fiberglass insulation, in the middle of summer, where the outdoor temperature is 100 degrees, and the attic is 130. It’s a pain to drag a cord.

    #681319
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    or inside an attic, with only 16″ or less head room, with fiberglass insulation, in the middle of summer, where the outdoor temperature is 100 degrees, and the attic is 130. It’s a pain to drag a cord.

    It sure is. Those are brutal working conditions.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #681357

    or inside an attic, with only 16″ or less head room, with fiberglass insulation, in the middle of summer, where the outdoor temperature is 100 degrees, and the attic is 130. It’s a pain to drag a cord.

    It sure is. Those are brutal working conditions.

    Agreed, the worse the work environment the more important a convenient tool, and cordless is the most convenient to use.

    Will

    #681361
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    where the outdoor temperature is 100 degrees

    story of my life lol
    our temps are easy going up to 115 and 125 in the summer.
    If I choose to go in an antic, then only early early in the morning.

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    #681379
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Can’t wait until the new Milwaukee super sawzall comes out, definitely looking forward to this one

    #681389
    CB
    Pro

    few months ago I was rebuilding a fence that collapsed after Irma, I was driving 4″ long TimberLok screws into PT 4X4s and 4X6s, and a 4ah battery lasts may be slightly over 1 hour, two batteries wouldn’t last a half day without a full charge.

    Also if you have 4 cordless tools and 8 batteries, there are some flexibility here if they are the same brand. If they are four different brands, having one charger not working and having to take it to a repair shop and leave it for a week pretty much makes the tool useless. If they are the same brand, you have no issue.

    Basically, anything that malfunctions whether it’s the battery, the charger, the tool you are out of luck. If you have the same platform, you are only out of luck if the actual tool break. In fact, you probably end up with extra chargers and batteries on a single platform which you can then have the luxury of taking having one at home, two in your truck which allows you to charge two at the same time.

    I like Timberloks. A lot. And I use them on fences and in pressure treated lumber too. I’m considering switching to the Simpson Strong Tie Strong Drive SDWS Timberscrew, but I buy 6″ TimberLoks by the case load, and still have two cases left that I have to use up first. So I know what you mean about driving Timberloks.

    But I haven’t had your experience of running out of battery, and I’m trying to think why. Knowing why might help me understand the difference between failure and success with one conundrum of cordless tool systems: buying everything one brand, regardless of how well or poorly an individual tool is designed, versus cultivating an a la carte collection of the best iteration of any particular tool, that just happens to be cordless, regardless of brand.

    One thing I do is use corded tools for heavy lifting, IF it is convenient to use a cord. So in the example of driving Timberloks… in the situation of rebuilding a fence… if I’ve already got shore or gen power set up to run a chop saw, Skilsaw, or demo hammer to chisel out post concrete, then I’ll go ahead and use that power that is already out there to drive as many Timberloks as the cord will reach. By getting the heavy lifting done with cords when convenient and easy, the batteries are preserved for when the cords wont reach, the access is tight, or other reasons when cordless is easier.

    The second thing that likely helps is what you said in your last paragraph quoted above… having multiple chargers. I’ve bought into two different cordless systems, and have 8 chargers for the first system, due to inadvertent accumulation, and two chargers for the second, due to specifically wanting a second charger. So whenever I use a cordless tool, regardless of which brand, there are always multiple chargers available to keep multiple batteries fresh simultaneously.

    The third thing that contributes to never running out of battery power is having a three battery rotation. One in the tool, one in the charger, and one already charged ready to go. Even in the heaviest use, the time it takes to charge one battery has never exceeded the time it takes to exhaust 2 batteries.

    All three of these factors combined together has yielded unlimited battery power for me, even with 35 year old NiCd battery tools. I suspect most younger folks would find these three things unnecessary after having been introduced to battery operated tools in the lithium ion age, and I might agree. Lithium Ion is soooo much better by comparison. But the habits required to keep NiCd’s running are already baked in, which makes the lithium ion performance all the more effective.

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    #681397
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I really put my Makita XRJ05 to the test on this last demo job. It preformed very well.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #681431
    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I am changing my answer.

    We got the 60v Dewalt recip a couple months ago. The 20v now feels like a toy, and I refuse to use it. The 60 is definitely heavy, but it performs almost identically to my 15 amp corded Makitas. I am definitely adding another one very soon.

    #681434

    @CB definitely agree with the 3 battery principle, as long as you don’t over heat the battery, because most battery packs will not accept a charge while they are hot, I have had that happen, usually takes easily twenty minutes just to cool down and take a charge.

    #681497
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    @cb definitely agree with the 3 battery principle, as long as you don’t over heat the battery, because most battery packs will not accept a charge while they are hot, I have had that happen, usually takes easily twenty minutes just to cool down and take a charge.

    I carry a blower with me and that cools the battery down real fast.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #681499

    @cb definitely agree with the 3 battery principle, as long as you don’t over heat the battery, because most battery packs will not accept a charge while they are hot, I have had that happen, usually takes easily twenty minutes just to cool down and take a charge.

    I carry a blower with me and that cools the battery down real fast.

    That’s a good idea, especially now that I have the blower, thanks

    #681608
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I carry a blower with me and that cools the battery down real fast.

    That is a good idea. Thank you

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #681617
    Clev08
    Pro

    I am changing my answer.

    We got the 60v Dewalt recip a couple months ago. The 20v now feels like a toy, and I refuse to use it. The 60 is definitely heavy, but it performs almost identically to my 15 amp corded Makitas. I am definitely adding another one very soon.

    In my opinion the dewalt 20V has always felt like a toy, and the vibration is horrible. We have them at work and they bog down real easy too.

    #681668
    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I am changing my answer.

    We got the 60v Dewalt recip a couple months ago. The 20v now feels like a toy, and I refuse to use it. The 60 is definitely heavy, but it performs almost identically to my 15 amp corded Makitas. I am definitely adding another one very soon.

    In my opinion the dewalt 20V has always felt like a toy, and the vibration is horrible. We have them at work and they bog down real easy too.

    I have used a few other cordless brands, and they all seem like toys compared to the 60v. We also have the 60v circular saws and rarely use a corded saw anymore. These are indeed game changers.

    #738350
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Can we have a discussion on reciprocating saws some more?

    Best 18V Cordless Reciprocating Saw Head-to-Head Review..
    https://www.protoolreviews.com/buying-guides/best-18v-cordless-reciprocating-saw-head-to-head-review/51471/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=18v_recip_saws_go_head_to_head_plus_our_latest_giveaway_and_more&utm_term=2019-12-04

    It;s nice to see that I have been using the recip saw that came out on top of the list.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #738391
    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    Why did they not test the Dewalt Flexvolt? I am sure the price is in line with the others.

    #738392
    CB
    Pro

    Can we have a discussion on reciprocating saws some more?

    I bought the all black Makita Sub-Compact shorty because it can fit entirely within the 14.5″ nominal space between studs in a stud bay with no offset angle.

    But it vibrates like a weight loss belt machine from the 1970’s.

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    #738394
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Why did they not test the Dewalt Flexvolt? I am sure the price is in line with the others.

    I believe that testing is largely paid advertising and the field of test tools is chosen by the guy with the chequebook.

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    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

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