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Cordless Reciprocating Saws

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  • #658379
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Honestly I don’t see Ridgid as a budget brand by any means.

    Hangman I type that as a joke. Before you were here I was ridiculed for my Ridgid tools. A fellow member called them a Big BoX Budget Brand tool. Or BBBBT,,,lol,,, I have been calling them that ever sense. LOL. I like the Ridgid tools I have and get good use out of them as you do.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #658699
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    My M18 Fuel recip is the total nuts. Haven’t picked up any of my corded ones since I got it.

    #658765
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    My M18 Fuel recip is the total nuts. Haven’t picked up any of my corded ones since I got it.

    Hey Sparky welcome back. That Milwaukee recip should be nice it just won a head to head test over on Tool Box Buzz

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #658802
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks, Bill. Good to see you’re still on.

    Haven’t checked that site in a while – thanks for reminding me about it.

    #658815
    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    My M18 Fuel recip is the total nuts. Haven’t picked up any of my corded ones since I got it.

    I hear from my friends at work who are using the Milwaukee platform, they rave about that saw, they definitely make some great tools. Wide range to choose from. And as Bill mentioned, great review and in the last shootout they did excellent

    #658824
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I hear from my friends at work who are using the Milwaukee platform, they rave about that saw, they definitely make some great tools. Wide range to choose from. And as Bill mentioned, great review and in the last shootout they did excellent

    Wonder what ever happened with the odd-shaped ergo ones that Bosch was coming out with, did they ever catch on? I’ve never run into anyone with one on the job anywhere. Have you tried one, Brian?

    #658830
    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I hear from my friends at work who are using the Milwaukee platform, they rave about that saw, they definitely make some great tools. Wide range to choose from. And as Bill mentioned, great review and in the last shootout they did excellent

    Wonder what ever happened with the odd-shaped ergo ones that Bosch was coming out with, did they ever catch on? I’ve never run into anyone with one on the job anywhere. Have you tried one, Brian?

    They are out, and even on the list to,
    I have heard good things so far from the people who have them.
    But have not seen any of them on the jobsite yet.
    And no I haven’t had the opportunity to try one out.
    I would definitely like to try it out.

    #658842
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    My M18 Fuel recip is the total nuts. Haven’t picked up any of my corded ones since I got it.

    I feel the same way about the new Makita recip saw.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #658869
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I feel the same way about the new Makita recip saw.

    DeWalt is probably a bit more popular with carpenters around here, but if I were one, I would have went Makita. Always liked their Japanese-made corded stuff, back in the day. Although, there’s the 60v yellow stuff now of course, but I haven’t run into anyone with any yet.

    #658924
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I feel the same way about the new Makita recip saw.

    Is that 18V single or double battery saw?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #658948
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    makita makes both a 18v and 36v brushless recip

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #659049
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I feel the same way about the new Makita recip saw.

    DeWalt is probably a bit more popular with carpenters around here, but if I were one, I would have went Makita. Always liked their Japanese-made corded stuff, back in the day. Although, there’s the 60v yellow stuff now of course, but I haven’t run into anyone with any yet.

    I have used the funky shaped dewalt 20volt and like it. It was smallish and light with a lot of power. The funky shaped Bosch is 2nd on my list.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #659059
    CB
    Pro

    I have the new Bosch, and although it didn’t rank in the top of this test, I am very happy with it! Smoothest running reciprocating saw I’ve used…

    Interesting points. On two counts.

    1. Smoothest running…

    To me, this is very important. I’m often using a recip in and around areas where collateral damage can occur which can potentially quintuple the cost of the job, on my dime, if I’m not careful and the blade tears its way through a membrane PVC roof or through wiring.

    Let’s put it this way, after being reminded of a pop song from the 90’s, repopularized in media today as the actor who sang (more like talked) the song promotes his new movie. Despite what his rap suggests, I don’t like “getting jiggy with it.” I want smooth. I want my fingers wrists and forearms to “feel” what the blade is cutting through, so that I can quickly, almost subconsciously, feel the end is near of the material I am cutting, so that I can be prepared to stop before the blade finds what was behind that material.

    Quite often, I’m cutting away nails that are holding boards I want to remove. Sometimes, I have to run a 12″ blade, and force a sideways bend in the blade, due to there not being room for the motor. It can get so dicey that I will grind the pointed ends down on some blades, to form smooth radiused tip, so that the tip will poke and prod, but not pierce what it may strike at the end of the stroke, in those cases where the nail is to far away to use a shorter blade, and too close to the surface I don’t want to strike to be able to prevent a strike at the end of the stroke.

    I didn’t follow the link or look at the video, but from the summary given in this thread, it turns out I have either the lightest weight or the lowest rated of all the cordless recips summarized in a post by another BTP member in this thread. The Porter Cable, rated at 4.4 (is that what those numbers are, ratings? Or are they pounds?). Don’t ask why I got started with Porter Cable LiIon tools, but I did, and they keep working, so I’m not trading up until something breaks.

    But as light (or as lame) as the Porter Cable cordless recip is, I can’t use the Porter cable for risky or dicey work. For that I have to go with my 20+ year old Milwaukee corded Sawzall. The USA made real Milwaukee. Long before TTI. And not a Super Sawzall either, which I also have. Nope. It has to be an original design SawZall, with a metal, not a gray plastic, motor body. I guess it might be more than 20 years old at this point. Anyways, THAT SawZall is the very smoothest operating reciprocating saw I have ever used, and it is the only one that I trust myself with when the stakes are high.

    Otherwise, heck ya, I grab the cordless Porter Cable. I’m actually trying to burn it up, cutting anything from concrete (with grit blade) to tree roots, 8″ in diameter, deep underground in the way of a foundation drainage system (with a pruning blade). Can’t kill it. But it transmits a lot of vibration and noise to the cutting process… so it cannot replace my Sawzall, despite the convenience of no cord.

    2. (You forgot there was a second point after all that blather? No worries!)

    The second point of interest is that it is ironic how the BTP member quoted above found his Bosch cordless recipro saw to be the smoothest running he has used, while I found my Bosch corded recipro saw to be the least smooth recipro saw of the three corded ones that I own.

    In fact, I ended up buying another Milwaukee Sawzall because of my disappointment with the vibration of the Bosch corded Panther that I was so excited about when I bought it 30 years ago. I posted a photo of it earlier this year. It still looks relatively new in the metal box for a reason.

    I bought the Bosch for four reasons: A) it had two stroke patterns, an orbital stroke as well as a straight stroke… B) it had variable speed, and a stroke per minute range of variability greater than any other saw at the time… C) it was double insulated, which meant that it didn’t require a grounded plug, which was useful for demo on WWII era houses that were still knob and tube wired with two prong receptacles, and … D) it was called “Panther”, with the image of the big cat crawling across the case and I couldn’t resist.

    It was literally an impulse buy, justified within 45 seconds of rationalization after first seeing it while at the checkout counter of the local tool store, back in the 80’s when we still had tool stores, before the big box era.

    But all those features went for naught, because of the Bosch’s vibration in the hands, no matter the speed or the stroke type. I went back to the metal bodied Milwaukee Sawzall, which was only straight action, and a few years later ended up getting a Super Sawzall for the orbital action. If I had to, I could happily do without the SuperSawzall, in favor of my older Sawzall, which is smoother running.

    I say ALL THAT to say that when it comes to choosing a new cordless reciprocating saw, all the cool features, the run time, the battery life, the stroke length, the stroke type, the brand, the reviews, the ratings… they might not mean as much as how the saw feels in your hands when you are using it in the clutch and the stakes of making a mistake are high.

    I’m not sure if there is any way to determine that by watching a video. If there was a way of trying before buying, that would be the direction I would take for any future tool purchases.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #659065
    xtsallad
    Pro
    Dallas, TX

    Was looking at the Makita X2 today and I don’t think I would like the bulkiness of two batteries. I want to like the flexvolt recip but have only heard that it has pretty bad vibration and I haven’t ever used either. Might get the new Bosch one day… or a Milwaukee one key. Not many feel good in hand to me compared to my old Bosch 18v. The front grip feels bulky. I wish I could hold the new Bosch but I wouldn’t know where to see it in person. It would be nice to be able to try tools out before buying.

    j

    #659068
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    @CB I think you’re dead on with your observations – the main reason I dislike my cordless DeWalt is how heavily it vibrates and all the noise it makes. My corded Bosch is better, but still not great. I would love to get to try out the newer Bosch ergonomic model, and even if it isn’t the fastest cut, if it handles nicely, that’s all that will matter. Because, as has been said above, the cut times are pretty close when you really think about it, and what you’ll really take away as the user is how it left your hands and arms feeling.

    Charlie
    __________________

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    #659074
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    2 batteries in a recip? No thanks. I don’t see the need for it, anyway.

    #659078
    CB
    Pro

    One more thing… as if my nickel wasn’t up already… on the acquisition of cordless tools.

    Don’t fall for the system trap.

    You know what I’m talking about…

    Once you go DeWalt, you buy yellow by default.

    Once you go Milwaukee, you want all of their red One Key.

    Once you go Makita, you want teal margaritas.

    Once you go Bosch, you can spend your points, Oh My Gosh!

    That sort of thing. That’s what they (that big conspiracy theory they, who watches all that we do, and is in control) WANT you to do. No, really. They being the marketers of the tool companies. They know you’ve been thinking about a new weedwacker, and since you’ve already got the charger and battery, well there ya go. Decision made.

    But stop. In the name of Lithium Ion. This battery chemistry really has changed everything, and made cordless tools viable. We woudnn’t be having this discussion were it not for the remarkably increased energy storage efficacy of lithium ion, brought down to an affordable scale, thanks to the economies of scale, and well, let’s face it… China.

    Back in the day having a homogeneous battery system for cordless tools not only made sense, it was actually VITAL, because nickel cadmium and nickel metal hydride batteries didn’t last more than an hour, and you needed to be able to yank a long 9.6V out of any given tool you had lying around just to finish driving the screw that was only half way through the wall board, before another sub got hurt and blamed you and your negligence. Leave a screw proud? Hang your head in shame. And don’t come back tomorrow.

    I probably still have 30 Makita batteries. I’d buy multiple drill and flashlight “kits” at Price Club (now Costco) just for the batteries. With batteries at $80 a piece, it was cheaper to pay $89 dollars for a drill, a flashlight, a charger, a case, and get TWO batteries thrown in as part of the deal. So yes, ALL of my cordless tools used to be Makita, with the same battery system. I had power strips laid out with an entire village of chargers… for just ME working by myself. That’s how pathetic battery operated tools used to be. But the convenience of being cord free was still worth it.

    Fast forward to today. I’m on break at home. For the last week. I brought one of my lithium ion drivers home to catch up on some honey dos around the house. Didn’t bring a charger. Didn’t bring an extra battery. It’s been a week. The damn thing is still working. Now granted, I’m just putting in a few screws here and a few bolts there. But a week? Seriously? The older batteries would have been gone within a day based on time alone, without pulling the trigger once.

    This is more for entertainment value… to remind the Gen X’ers and the Millennials and whatever generation we are working on popping out now… how far up hill us old Baby Boomers had to climb through the snow, uphill both ways, when it comes to battery operated cordless tools. Who here reading remembers the 7.2v Skil Twist? Heck, my Sonicare tooth brush can vibrate more screws flush than that thing could properly drive. No offense Bosch. I know that you and Skil were bedfellows once.

    Anyways, all this is to say that if you see and feel and audition and actually try out a cordless reciprocating saw that you genuinely like, and that feels good to you, but that is not a part of your current color of tool system? Buy it ANYWAY. With one charger, and two batteries, that will be all you need. It’ll run long enough to get your job done. Who cares that it doesn’t match your system. If the tool PERFORMS the way you need it to, avail yourself to what works for you.

    Long lasting lithium ion battery chemistry make this possible.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #659232
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I feel the same way about the new Makita recip saw.

    Is that 18V single or double battery saw?

    It’s the single battery. I love it.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #659259
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    It’s the single battery. I love it.

    That’s great Dirty. All of the tests rate that one very high and powerful.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #681238
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    You know what I’m talking about… Anyways, all this is to say that if you see and feel and audition and actually try out a cordless reciprocating saw that you genuinely like, and that feels good to you, but that is not a part of your current color of tool system? Buy it ANYWAY. With one charger, and two batteries, that will be all you need. It’ll run long enough to get your job done. Who cares that it doesn’t match your system. If the tool PERFORMS the way you need it to, avail yourself to what works for you.

    Long lasting lithium ion battery chemistry make this possible.

    Some good points. However, I cannot imagine having a cordless sawzall, a cordless hammer drill, a cordless impact driver, and a cordless angle grinder on one simple project and have to rely on 4 different types of chargers and 4 different sets of batteries.

    Will one set of batteries last throughout the day? May be, depends on your specific tasks and how much juice that requires. You may be able to last a day or two driving small screws, but few months ago I was rebuilding a fence that collapsed after Irma, I was driving 4″ long TimberLok screws into PT 4X4s and 4X6s, and a 4ah battery lasts may be slightly over 1 hour, two batteries wouldn’t last a half day without a full charge.

    Also if you have 4 cordless tools and 8 batteries, there are some flexibility here if they are the same brand. If they are four different brands, having one charger not working and having to take it to a repair shop and leave it for a week pretty much makes the tool useless. If they are the same brand, you have no issue.

    Basically, anything that malfunctions whether it’s the battery, the charger, the tool you are out of luck. If you have the same platform, you are only out of luck if the actual tool break. In fact, you probably end up with extra chargers and batteries on a single platform which you can then have the luxury of taking having one at home, two in your truck which allows you to charge two at the same time.

    Additionally, you have the option to expand your tool set by buying just the bare tool.

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