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Concrete dust inside drill chuck

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  • #730709
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I need some advice on how to clear concrete dust out of drill chucks.

    In the past when I have to use a drill upside down either to cut sheetrock with a hole saw (for recessed light cutouts) or to drill into concrete, the dust just falls right down as I drill.

    I bought one of the “cone” gadgets that you attach to trap the dust as you drill. I have one of those “Hole Pro” attachment. But the problem with trapping dust inside those transparent cones is you can’t see what you are drilling anymore. So sometimes I use them and sometimes I don’t.

    Yesterday I had to mount some brackets for hurricane shutters in preparation for hurricane Dorian. I didn’t have my “Hole Pro” with me. I drilled into solid concrete upside down for Tapcon installation and the concrete dust falls on my drill constantly and after about 20 holes or so I can no longer turn my 18V hammer drill chuck loose to free the bit. I struggled with it and eventually got it free, but the chuck seems to be sluggish now. It’s a Milwaukee Fuel 18V hammer drill. I remember having an older corded Makita hammer drill also suffered from the chuck being jammed by a lot of drilling into the ceiling with fallen dust.

    I used a can of compressed air and blow into the chuck, some dust came out but the chuck remains the same. Very difficult to tighten and untighten now. Do I need to take the chuck apart?

    #730711
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    I just use a blow gun with my compressor, then spray either WD-40 or Tri-flow.

    It’s worked every time for me.

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #730712
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    You can try putting some duct or electrical tape around the chuck as well.

    But you’ll still have to blow out the motor housing every now and again.

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #730717
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I just use a blow gun with my compressor, then spray either WD-40 or Tri-flow.

    It’s worked every time for me.

    Same here.
    Blow the dust and then spray in some of those things.
    I use WD-40. Never heard of Tri-flow.

    #730730

    Yeah I just usually blow off and out , what about using one of the xxl rubber glove fingers around the chuch ? I wonder if it would be possible.

    #730749
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Use an SDS-Plus drill and bit. Problem solved.

    #730756
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Use an SDS-Plus drill and bit. Problem solved.

    SDS+ drill requires two hands, and it’s much heavier. Makes a huge difference if drilling hundreds of holes holding a tool up. A hammer drill in that case is much more versatile and free up the other hand to hold the material against the ceiling.

    #730781
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Use an SDS-Plus drill and bit. Problem solved.

    SDS+ drill requires two hands, and it’s much heavier. Makes a huge difference if drilling hundreds of holes holding a tool up. A hammer drill in that case is much more versatile and free up the other hand to hold the material against the ceiling.

    Good point. Hadn’t considered that. What diameter holes are you having to drill?

    #730815
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I agree compressed air and WD-40, do not know if the cans of compressed air will be strong enough though.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #730881
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I agree compressed air and WD-40, do not know if the cans of compressed air will be strong enough though.

    I will go with this also, compressed air from a air gun on a compressor will have a lot more force to break the dust loose than air from a can. I would seriously look at the battery SDS rotary hammers. We use them a lot one handed for several hundred screws in a day at times. Bosch has a nice compact one that is easy on the arm to handle for a lot of drilling. The time you save in drilling a hole will easily make up for any extra fatigue as they drill probably 3 times as fast or more.

    #739185

    Blow air straight into the hole with the canned air. This will loosen and remove some of the concrete dust around the drill bit. Lock the jaws of a pair of vise grips around the end of the bit, if the bit broke off above the surface. Grab the bit as close to the work surface as possible.

    drillinfo.com

    #751627

    The dust particles of concrete are very fine, and vacuuming will not remove them easily. Especially when you drill the hole for tapcon screws.
    I’m suggesting a different tip. We use it all the time and got the best results.
    Use a liquid to remove all of the dust particles. Just mix 12 ounces of hydrogen peroxide in 1 gallon of water and use soft cotton rags to wipe the surfaces of the drill chuck.
    Water alone doesn’t pick up all of such dust particles and requires multiple sorts of cleanings.
    This solution eliminates the particles and makes it a bit easier for the rags to absorb them and carry them away.

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