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Concrete anchors….

Viewing 19 posts - 21 through 39 (of 39 total)
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  • #748634

    Wedge anchors are one of the most commonly used concrete anchors in our daily lives. Most concrete anchors work in one of two ways–either by expanding against the sides of the hole and gripping the concrete or by the friction against the sides of the hole. The gripping power of an anchor depends on the quality of the concrete and where the anchor is positioned. If the concrete is old and brittle, the holding power of the fastener will be reduced.
    These are the fasteners you’ll buy and use most often in your houses. They’re great for fastening the shelf brackets, rake, towel bars, and any sort of brackets, shower doors, pipe and conduit retainers or anything else lighter than 50 lbs. They need a pilot hole at least as deep as the screw will penetrate. Each package will tell the size of the hole and screw that’ll work best.

    #748638

    Wedge anchors are one of the most commonly used concrete anchors in our daily lives. Most concrete anchors work in one of two ways–either by expanding against the sides of the hole and gripping the concrete or by the friction against the sides of the hole. The gripping power of an anchor depends on the quality of the concrete and where the anchor is positioned. If the concrete is old and brittle, the holding power of the fastener will be reduced.

    These are the fasteners you’ll buy and use most often in your houses. They’re great for fastening the shelf brackets, rake, towel bars, and any sort of brackets, shower doors, pipe and conduit retainers or anything else lighter than 50 lbs. They need a pilot hole at least as deep as the screw will penetrate. Each package will tell the size of the hole and screw that’ll work best.

    I think most people don’t use the wedge style fastener
    anymore . The designed screw bolts have come a long way . Simpson Strong tie makes some great fasteners just screw right into the concrete great holding power .

    Always willing to learn .

    #748871
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    The designed screw bolts have come a long way . Simpson Strong tie makes some great fasteners just screw right into the concrete great holding power .

    There are many applications concrete screws will not work and requires a flush anchor that receives a threaded bolt. The issue with concrete screws like Tapcons and Simpsons is they are a one time one shot installation that cannot be removed, once removed, a new hole has to be drilled at a different location.

    #748886

    The designed screw bolts have come a long way . Simpson Strong tie makes some great fasteners just screw right into the concrete great holding power .

    There are many applications concrete screws will not work and requires a flush anchor that receives a threaded bolt. The issue with concrete screws like Tapcons and Simpsons is they are a one time one shot installation that cannot be removed, once removed, a new hole has to be drilled at a different location.

    Yes very true about not being able to remove them out if your taking somethings apart a few times for certain applications .

    Always willing to learn .

    #748911
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The issue with concrete screws like Tapcons and Simpsons is they are a one time one shot installation that cannot be removed, once removed, a new hole has to be drilled at a different location.

    This is true, make sure what you mount is permanent.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #748951

    The designed screw bolts have come a long way . Simpson Strong tie makes some great fasteners just screw right into the concrete great holding power .

    There are many applications concrete screws will not work and requires a flush anchor that receives a threaded bolt. The issue with concrete screws like Tapcons and Simpsons is they are a one time one shot installation that cannot be removed, once removed, a new hole has to be drilled at a different location.

    🙄 I wasn’t aware of that , guess I won’t be removing the stainless steel ladder and rail support cups I installed earlier this year ,
    I like these Cobra used them a few times

    #748962
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    We used some 3/8x 3″ Tapcons today to secure some steel posts to concrete pads. East install, and seem to hold great.

    #748980
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    We used some 3/8x 3″ Tapcons today to secure some steel posts to concrete pads. Easy install, and seem to hold great.

    Tapcons are nice They work great.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #755847
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I have to attach a toilet to a concrete floor, so something reusable is in order. I had tapcons suggested in one place but I think by the time you got anywhere near torque the porcelin would break. I thought about drilling holes and putting a wood plug in the concrete, but some sort of threaded insert would be ideal I think. Plastic or metal, not sure. Any suggestions on that front?

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755851
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I have to attach a toilet to a concrete floor, so something reusable is in order. I had tapcons suggested in one place but I think by the time you got anywhere near torque the porcelin would break. I thought about drilling holes and putting a wood plug in the concrete, but some sort of threaded insert would be ideal I think. Plastic or metal, not sure. Any suggestions on that front?

    You don’t attach a toilet to a concrete floor. You attach a toilet flange to the floor, then flange bolts go into the slots on the flange which the toilet attach to and you don’t “torque down” the flange bolts just snug to secure the toilet to the flange with the wax ring properly compressed or as you say the porcelain will break.

    I would set a solid stainless steel flange onto the concrete floor and make sure the flange sits over the finished floor.

    #755852
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    You attach a toilet flange to the floor,

    There is no flange. It’s a Saniflo that discharges out the back into a macerating pump. The toilet gets bolted to the floor.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755855
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    You don’t attach a toilet to a concrete floor.

    Don’t or shouldn’t ? LOL

    Attachments:
    #755870
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    You don’t attach a toilet to a concrete floor.

    Don’t or shouldn’t ? LOL

    Eeh, semantics ( eyes rolling emoji ) 😀

    #755891

    You don’t attach a toilet to a concrete floor.

    Don’t or shouldn’t ? LOL

    🤯🤢🤢😐 Yeah shouldn’t lol.

    #755892

    You attach a toilet flange to the floor,

    There is no flange. It’s a Saniflo that discharges out the back into a macerating pump. The toilet gets bolted to the floor.

    Is it regular height toilet , or is it the higher comfort height 16.5 or 17

    I’m just asking because if it’s the regular , maybe make a wooden template 3/4 or even up to 1-1/2 inch that can be painted white to match the bowl , that matches the bottom of the bowl , this way you can tapcon the wood to the floor , and then use regular hardware or lags to hold it down , obviously not over torquing it 🤷‍♂️
    If not , what about concrete anchors that have the studs that stick up and you use nuts on them for tightened down , but once again not torquing it down

    #755893
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    concrete anchors that have the studs that stick up and you use nuts on them for tightened down

    I didn’t even know such a thing existed. Which is why I asked. I will look into that.

    I did email Saniflo and I will copy and paste their reply from the email I got back from them…

    there is no recommended way of attaching the toilet you will just have to dig holes for the bolts to hold

    Not very good customer support (or knowledge) is it?

    I replied back with

    “Dig holes for the bolts to hold”?

    Is there someone else who knows about installing your product on a concrete floor that you could refer my questions to please?

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755896
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    Update:

    So, inside the box with the tank is a package of hardware to attach the tank to the bowl. It that (of all places) are 2 plastic anchors and screws to attach the bowl to the floor. I just got off the phone with Saniflush and they told me where to look for the parts. I guess that’s all it takes to stop the bowl from moving around. You would think that the parts would be in the box with the bowl, or the box with the pump and all the other connectors and hook up equipment. I guess I should have unpacked everything first, but it was not logical to me to have the parts in a box that has nothing to do with that part of the job.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755898

    Update:

    So, inside the box with the tank is a package of hardware to attach the tank to the bowl. It that (of all places) are 2 plastic anchors and screws to attach the bowl to the floor. I just got off the phone with Saniflush and they told me where to look for the parts. I guess that’s all it takes to stop the bowl from moving around. You would think that the parts would be in the box with the bowl, or the box with the pump and all the other connectors and hook up equipment. I guess I should have unpacked everything first, but it was not logical to me to have the parts in a box that has nothing to do with that part of the job.

    Lol well at least you got it figured out , as long as it will be solid to the floor , that’s all that matters , 🤞

    #755924

    The other thing you can do Jim , if you drill into the concrete and epoxy or pl the brass bolt’s after you cut the key end off the bolts ,
    Just an idea , heck you can even pl the toilet right to the concrete lol should never move 😜

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