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Compressor setup and line drops

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  • #343039

    RapidAir is the brand name, I’ve seen them available at Northerntool.com, and I stand corrected, it isn’t PEX it is HDPE rated at 140 psi @ 140 deg F or 175 psi at 70 F. And it comes in 1/2, 3/4, & 1″ sizes.

    #343355
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    They also have FastPipe. It is an aluminum pipe good for 190 lbs of pressure. The system is specifically designed to plumb air compressor systems. You cut the aluminum pipe to length and then use the special connectors to screw every thing together. No crimping, looks like a good system.

    http://www.rapidairproducts.com/fastpipe.asp

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #350898
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I installed a 60GAL compressor and ran lines to control the temp of the air and moisture in it.

    First I hooked up an hour meter to my compressor so I can monitor usage.
    I ran 1″ galvanized pipe to two drops in my garage. The first one is approx 25′ in pipe from the tank and the second one is close to 50′ from it. The furthest drop will be setup for using paint guns and sand blasting media. Still have to install the dryer in that location.
    There is a water collection drop below each connection and an intermediate water drop in between both drops.

    First drop.. In this pic you can see the water collection drop just opposite the man door.

    Second drop just on the other side of the garage door.

    You did everything right, Frank. Drops coming off the top of the line, water traps below the FRLs, galv pipe, the works. I spent many years working with air systems and air tools and you would be surprised at the horror shows out there handling compressed air.
    Yours is definitely a “this is how it should be done” piece of work.

    Thanks for that link Eric! I learned something new today although my plumber buddy says he dislikes Pex himself for anything. Nothing in his mind would outlast copper. I guess he’s old school.

    Copper is about the worst choice for air lines. The acid produced by degradation of the oil in the compressor will destroy copper in a very short time.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #350904
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I saw this in an old Hot Rod magazine when I was young, I will try to explain it. It is to get your air dry, it was being used in a paint shop.

    Mount the compressor high if you can.

    The main line feeding out needs to drop straight down, a tight 90, a water separator, then another tight 90 going back up, so you have a U with the water separator at the bottom. The separator should not be tight to the wall, and close enough to the floor that you can get a bucket around the separator.

    The separator is now in the lowest part of the line (where you would expect moisture to flow to). When it is critical that the air is super dry simply work the bucket into position around the separator and fill the bucket with ice. This will make any moisture in the compressed air condense easier and the separator way more efficient.

    I hope that helps, it is one of those tricks from way back.

    Great way to do it! Cooling the air is the most important part of dropping water out of it. Water is vapour at compressor temps, it only forms liquid which can be separated when it cools.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #352173
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    When it is critical that the air is super dry simply work the bucket into position around the separator and fill the bucket with ice.

    JDO, Thank you for the tip. That will work good. In the body shop I worked in the compressor was in the cold cellar. It needed drained a lot but we had dry air.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #352211
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    The second drop in my hard line is approx 40 liner feet from the tank with three water drops along the way. I have an air dryer at that end and by the time the air reaches there the temp of the air has dropped enough that no water vapors are in it.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #352457
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The second drop in my hard line is approx 40 liner feet from the tank with three water drops along the way. I have an air dryer at that end and by the time the air reaches there the temp of the air has dropped enough that no water vapors are in it.

    Isn’t it strange that most compressor installations put the dryer right next to the compressor. Right where it shouldn’t be.
    Are you using a dessicant dryer or refrigerated dryer?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #352473
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Isn’t it strange that most compressor installations put the dryer right next to the compressor. Right where it shouldn’t be.
    Are you using a dessicant dryer or refrigerated dryer?

    I use the dessicant dryer from PA. Caught it when it went on sale a number of years ago and the one I have is their patented yellow. 🙂
    http://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/air-dryer/A-p8055757e

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #378361

    I recently did a install in my garage for my compressor. Found a product by the name AIRnet. No special tools needed, and they cover a range from 3/4″ to 6″, 3/4″ & 1″ worked just fine for what I needed. The stuff was pretty slick and all I needed was a cordless drill for mounts, and a copper tube cutter and deburring tool. The fittings up to 2″ use the same concept as shark bite.

    http://www.airnet-system.com/us/

    Oh, and a 10 year warranty was pretty nice!

    #378558

    If you go to the PEX website, they tell you their product is not rated for air, so why would you do this and jeopardize safety? I have been in the air compressor industry for 14 year, and I will put up nothing other than aluminum piping. It is light weight, corrosion resistant, and looks really good. If you need help, feel free to message me.

    Stay away from PEX. Your just asking for trouble in my opinion.

    @Dirty

    John 206-423-6769

    #378562
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    If you go to the PEX website, they tell you their product is not rated for air, so why would you do this and jeopardize safety? I have been in the air compressor industry for 14 year, and I will put up nothing other than aluminum piping. It is light weight, corrosion resistant, and looks really good. If you need help, feel free to message me.

    Stay away from PEX. Your just asking for trouble in my opinion.

    @Dirty

    John 206-423-6769

    So why Tagg me?? I know that!! I knew long before your 14 years in the air compressor industry. I have been dealing with OSHA for the last 30 years and those of us in the building industry know that plastics have never been approved for compressed air of vacuum set ups.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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