dcsimg

CO2 And Nail Guns

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 36 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #163202
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    What happens if you run CO2 through a gun? I’ve always heard that it’ll damage them, i just don’t know how.

    Delta

    #163205
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I’ve never heard of any negatives. Just oil as normal.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #163218
    RyanF
    Pro

    I’ve seen these setups before with someone doing it in a systainer. I think it was on FOG.

    It sure would be nice to not have to worry about a compressor for a couple one-offs on a repair. How long do they last? I’d imagine it working OK for small brads and pins.

    #163230
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have a couple tanks and regulators from a now-defunct restaurant, but I never use them for power tools. I use them just for portable clean-up and such.

    At over 1000 psi when full, it would last quite a while with a pin nailer, especially for quick jobs where you don’t want to fire up a compressor. I just heard it would damage tools.

    Delta

    #163263
    RyanF
    Pro

    How exactly does that work, as far as how many shots with a gun at a certain psi?

    Let’s say you dial a finish nailer normally at 100. It seems too crude to think it means you get 10 shots until it’s spent. I assume inlet volume factors in, but I have no idea how to go about figuring how long a cannister would last for a given nailer.

    #163266

    CO2 works great for running air tools, I’ve framed a 600 sq ft basement on a 15# cylinder. I built a setup a long time ago but don’t use nail guns much anymore, the ones that I do use are battery now.

    I have a fixed regulator (150PSI) that I put right on the tank and then an adjustable that connects to the gun.

    You don’t want CO2 in your guns, but you want the gas from the CO2. In other words you don’t want a siphon tank and you want your tank UPRIGHT when using.

    Robert Shaw -Colorado Deck and Framing
    www.mysteeldeck.com

    #163275
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I have seen the setups at several tool stores, they look handy. you can use canisters smaller than a 2 liter pop bottle up to a scuba tank. I read somewhere that even the small canister will shoot several hundred nails.

    #163313
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    im not sure. the guys i know that run cannisters just use oxygen, they go to the dive shops here for refills

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #163425

    From my chemistry background, I don’t understand what running CO2 would do negatively to a gun. It is pretty much unreactive chemically without the presence of water. Oxygen would be more reactive than CO2. I’d say go for it.

    #163431
    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    From my chemistry background, I don’t understand what running CO2 would do negatively to a gun. It is pretty much unreactive chemically without the presence of water. Oxygen would be more reactive than CO2. I’d say go for it.

    The only negative factors I can think of (from a paintball background, so take this with a grain of salt) is the previously mentioned liquid CO2 siphoning into the gun, which will destroy your o-rings if it happens during heavy, rapid use.
    If it does siphon in a liquid form, it can also freeze up the internals (for a very short period, and without a proper regulator you can get very inconsistent pressure to the gun, resulting in either too little or way too much power.
    You will get plenty of fuel out of a 20 oz canister, but if you can, opt for the O2 set up if you can find one. Expensive, but more consistent, and the fills last much longer.
    The difference is huge…when I was playing tourney ball I ran a 68 cubic inch 4500 psi fiber wrapped tank that would supply a consistent 400 psi through the bottle regulator through my air source adapter to my markers regulator; from there it was regulated to 90 psi to flow through the internal solenoid that fired anywhere from 6-15 times per second. That tank would last me for about 1000-1200 shots, non stop.
    When I went to the rec field and played with the CO2 guns, one could expect to get about 6-800 shots at a rate of 4-6 or 7 per second before the CO2 would start to act up (on an un-regulated gun), siphon into the internals, and freeze up or start having serious velocity increases and performance issues.
    So basically, they will both work just fine….I’m not familiar with the regulator setups for nail guns and CO2. But the setup will be cheaper than O2, but the trade off (I think) would be the ability to do a lot of bump firing.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #163433

    You have great experience with CO2. It would liquefy at a much higher temperature than liquid O2. I could see the cold spreading into the gun from liquid CO2 whereas the O2 canister would only be gas. That would explain the “freezing”. As you say this would show up with rapid fire versus staggered shots.

    #163443
    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    Thank you!
    The other upside to the O2 system is that it is not in a liquid state, just pure pressurized air condensed in a tiny, dangerous little package.
    But again…I have to say, I am not at all familiar with the CO2 set ups for nail guns, and the issues with siphoning may be non existent.
    Dangit…now I want one.
    Wonder if I can modify my old air tank to work on my framing and finishing guns 😀 ?

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #163515
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The difference between compressed air and CO2 is the CO2 tank is at much higher pressures therefore you can pack more gas in a smaller size. With air the common pressure is between 100-150 PSI. With CO2 the pressure can be as high as 4000 PSI (quality certified tank and refilled at the same place that sells welding gases).

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #163536

    I would occasionally get frosting on my fixed regulator (mounted on the tank) and maybe a few inches up the hose if it was under heavy use, but never had any negative effect. I own a 20lb tank now and a 2.5lb tank, I need to get both filled as they can be quite handy.

    Robert Shaw -Colorado Deck and Framing
    www.mysteeldeck.com

    #163588
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I really like the idea, For one thing it’s silent. Not having an air compressor would be so cool

    #164776
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I would occasionally get frosting on my fixed regulator (mounted on the tank) and maybe a few inches up the hose if it was under heavy use, but never had any negative effect. I own a 20lb tank now and a 2.5lb tank, I need to get both filled as they can be quite handy.

    Well, if you’ve never had problems doing it, I guess I’ll give it a try. Thanks, Robert

    Delta

    #164779
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I really like the idea, For one thing it’s silent. Not having an air compressor would be so cool

    It’s pretty handy, but it would get pretty expensive to do it a lot. I spend about 16 dollars to fill a 20 pound canister. I don’t think I’d want to run a framing nailer off of it all day. 😮

    Delta

    #164797
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    I’m really tempted by these small bottle setups, does anyone know what PSI they usually max out at when filling? I need to see who fills them around me, it would be great to have one for inside jobs since my smallest compressor is still a bit of a beast to lug around, the bottle would be quiet and much easier to store than adding a 3rd sized compressor.

    #164804
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’m really tempted by these small bottle setups, does anyone know what PSI they usually max out at when filling? I need to see who fills them around me, it would be great to have one for inside jobs since my smallest compressor is still a bit of a beast to lug around, the bottle would be quiet and much easier to store than adding a 3rd sized compressor.

    When my 20 lb tank is filled, it’s somewhere between 850 and 1100 psi. I think it changes depending on temperature.

    I get mine filled at the oxygen company. They do all kinds of welding gases and welding equipment. A fire extinguisher company will do them, also.

    Delta

    #188059

    I knew this thread existed and was trying to remember where it was…

    For somebody who doesn’t need a full time compressor or who wants to do some quick work without the hassle of the compressor, the CO2 setups seem perfect… If I didn’t already have the Rolair JC10, I might have bought this – https://powertank.com/products/sfID1/34/productID/223

    it is expensive, but I don’t really use my compressor too often at this point…

    John S

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 36 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.354 seconds