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Circular saw blades?

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  • #743300

    Going to try this in another section and not put in a link to see if the thread posts this time.

    Wondering what folks are using for circular saw blades, I need a new one.

    The one that came with the Skilsaw was OK but worn out now. What I want is an inexpensive blade that will handle framing yet give me a decent cut on plywood with my track. I looked at a Freud 24 tooth framing blade but the body seemed really thin. It was $18 CDN. What are you using that you like?

    #743317
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    For circular saw blades I use what ever I find on sale. But then again I don’t use one for finish cuts. Just ruff framing.
    For plywood you might use a higher tooth count blade(40). It will give a better finish cut.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #743318
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    The Freud framing blades are a decent blades and most circular saw blades that you find in a store are going to be thin kerf blades. I primarily use the Diablo saw blade line that is made by Freud.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #743323
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    When it’s special at $3 CAD I buy 10 of them. I use them in circular saws and table saw. A new one in table saw would cut baltic birch plywood without chipping. But I wouldn’t push my luck for too many cuts.

    #743325
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I don’t think you can get a single blade to perform for both situations. A good 18 to 24 tooth carbide, for framing but if you want finish cuts on plywood, go to a 40 tooth carbide.

    Freud makes excellent blades that hold an edge well and are durable, I would highly recommend them for both of the blades you are looking for.

    I have used the really cheap blades and find that they throw sawdust much worse than a mid priced blade. I get a lot of my blades on the Black Friday sales where you can get a decent blade at a pretty good price. I have used probably every manufacturers blades, and find the name brand are typically better that the off brand.

    #743345

    I actually use the Bosch Daredevil blade on my circular saw , it’s pretty decent , also thin but good for the price. I’ve never tried the Diablo but supposed to be a good blade also.
    Let me know what you decide on.

    #743356
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I don’t think you can get a single blade to perform for both situations

    Kurt interesting observations from a guy I am sure goes through a bunch of saw blades

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #743362
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    As far as the blades being thin, Most saw blades available, especially in the circular saw market are “thin Kerf ” blades. They provide less resistance to the saw cutting through material as they are removing less material.

    To get a standard kerf blade you need to go to a higher end blade and a blade with a greater tooth count such as the 40 tooth blades. The standard kerf will be stiffer and have less deflection in a cut which is important in a finishing cut such as when using a track saw, but not as important when cutting framing materials. A slight deflection in a cut of a 2 x 4 for a wall is a lot less critical that in finishing work. The speed of the cut is a lot greater with a thin kerf blade over a standard kerf blade also. The difference is minimal but it is there.

    #743364
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    As far as the blades being thin, Most saw blades available, especially in the circular saw market are “thin Kerf ” blades. They provide less resistance to the saw cutting through material as they are removing less material.

    To get a standard kerf blade you need to go to a higher end blade and a blade with a greater tooth count such as the 40 tooth blades. The standard kerf will be stiffer and have less deflection in a cut which is important in a finishing cut such as when using a track saw, but not as important when cutting framing materials. A slight deflection in a cut of a 2 x 4 for a wall is a lot less critical that in finishing work. The speed of the cut is a lot greater with a thin kerf blade over a standard kerf blade also. The difference is minimal but it is there.

    How big would be a deflection in a 7 1/4″ blade?
    1/64″ ? We’re cutting wood not space ship parts.

    #743369
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    As far as the blades being thin, Most saw blades available, especially in the circular saw market are “thin Kerf ” blades. They provide less resistance to the saw cutting through material as they are removing less material.

    To get a standard kerf blade you need to go to a higher end blade and a blade with a greater tooth count such as the 40 tooth blades. The standard kerf will be stiffer and have less deflection in a cut which is important in a finishing cut such as when using a track saw, but not as important when cutting framing materials. A slight deflection in a cut of a 2 x 4 for a wall is a lot less critical that in finishing work. The speed of the cut is a lot greater with a thin kerf blade over a standard kerf blade also. The difference is minimal but it is there.

    How big would be a deflection in a 7 1/4″ blade?

    1/64″ ? We’re cutting wood not space ship parts.

    The deflection is very minimal and only important in very hard woods or when cutting wide boards. It would not be even noticeable except in reap precise trim work. I have seen it a lot more in the cheaper 12″ blades for miter saws than in 7 1/4″ blades.

    The purpose of my comment above was basically to say that the OP should not really worry about the thickness of the blade, but more the tooth count in what he is doing.

    #743370

    Agree with pretty much everything said, my $0.02. (do Canadians say “just my $0.028 ?).

    Thin kerf vs thick kerf also depends on how or what you are doing. I am confident that everyone here on BTP can make a blade with XX number of teeth, thin kerf and thick kerf cut the exact same way with the same wood finish on the cut. A careful slow and methodical cut won’t create much deflection. Show of hands, who has time to cut their material as slow as possible?

    Time equals money. You need to get through your material and move on. A thick kerf is going to allow you to push that saw through quickly with maybe a slight amount of deflection. Make that same cut with a thin kerf and you are going to see deflection.

    Thin kerf blades, a lot of the time, are included with cordless saws because there is less material to get through and the user is going to treat it differently knowing it is cordless. However, the game is changing. Bosch’s new group of circ/miter/track saws are entering the power of a corded tool, so the thin kerf may not be as needed, like cordless saws of old. However, reducing the amount of material removal is always going to give you more cuts per charge.

    Dadgineer
    Project Leader - Bosch Power Tools North America

    #743376
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Bigger the blade, bigger the deflection. If the cut rate is slow you’ll get minimal deflection in bigger blades too.

    #743383
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    I swear by the Diablo Demo Demon saw blades. You can usually find a two pack at HD for around $20. You just have to look for them on an end cap. Ive never seen these packages in the saw blade section, only singles for close to the same price.

    #743384
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I swear by the Diablo Demo Demon saw blades. You can usually find a two pack at HD for around $20. You just have to look for them on an end cap. Ive never seen these packages in the saw blade section, only singles for close to the same price.

    This one?

    #743390
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    We do a combination of demo and framing. I used to keep the used blades for demo use only. Now we just use whatever blade is on the saw, then change it out later. Most of the time I grab either the Deablo, Dewalt, or Avanti blades. Many times these can be found for about $4 or $5 per blade. I always stock up when I see them cheap.

    #743391
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I always stock up when I see them cheap.

    Likewise here. Anytime there is a sale time to stock up.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #743398
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    We do a combination of demo and framing. I used to keep the used blades for demo use only. Now we just use whatever blade is on the saw, then change it out later. Most of the time I grab either the Deablo, Dewalt, or Avanti blades. Many times these can be found for about $4 or $5 per blade. I always stock up when I see them cheap.

    I do the same, when you find blades cheap, buy a dozen.
    in regular framing you can deal with a blade that is a little less sharp. The time I always like a fresh blade is when cutting stair stringers. It is so much nicer cutting them with a fresh blade.

    #743491
    Clev08
    Pro

    I’m a big fan of the diablo blades as well, the performance/price is the best in my opinion.

    #743515
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    in regular framing you can deal with a blade that is a little less sharp.

    True. No body see the splinters once it gets covered with siding/brick or drywall.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #743699
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    @sorpa

    I used to buy those ones alot, still will if I see them for the right price. But these are the ones I’ve been really liking like lately.

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