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central vac via dust collection??

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
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  • #186480
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Does anybody see a reason NOT to use a cyclone dust collector as a vacuum for the central vac in the house??

    We where laying out the central vac diagram an I figured I could kill two bird with one stone?

    Any thoughts or crazy idea?

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #186481
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Does anybody see a reason NOT to use a cyclone dust collector as a vacuum for the central vac in the house??

    We where laying out the central vac diagram an I figured I could kill two bird with one stone?

    Any thoughts or crazy idea?

    Did the google thing and found most say it wont work well because, Dust collectors are high volume/low static pressure devices and vacuums are low volume/high static pressure devices.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #186516
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Ya, It’s looks like I will need to talk to the DC company. I am looking at the clearvue cyclone. They should be able to give me WP specs and I can compare to actual vacuums.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #187405
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Brad, I can’t think of a reason why it wouldn’t work and also save you time and money on filter bags. I did find that the vac has to work significantly harder when its pulling vacuum on the dust deputy but that just might mean getting a slightly beefier vac.

    #187431
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    It would seem you are talking about a whole house central vac such as the Beam system. We have had three of themIin our last 3 homes. They don’t have a bag, so you don’t have to worry about that. The containers are fairly small, a gallon or two. I don’t think I would try to use one for dust collection in a shop or vice versa. Even with a additional cyclone . I thi k a dedicated dust collection system at the shop would work significantly better.

    #187452
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    I was thinking of going the other way. Purchase this guy:

    http://www.clearvuecyclones.com/cv1800-series/23-cv1800-lh-single-phase-with-filters.html

    and hook up the house to it. It seems that the dust collectors are high CFMs but low suck (inches of water lift) which surprises me.

    Vacuums are low CFMs but have a higher inches of water lift.

    I was just trying to save money and have one unit.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #187560

    Well everything I have heard about Clearvue Cyclones is that their products are quality. I plead ignorance with regards to resolving your concern, but you can definitely have confidence that the cyclone will be quality.

    John S

    #187573
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    A lot has to do with the sizeof the pipe. A dust collector with 4″ pipe will have high flow but low inches of lift. In a 1 1/ 2 to 2″ pipe, the flow will be less but the air will move faster and therefore have more lift.

    I still think you would be disappointed with a dust collector tied ti a vacuum system. But hey, give it a try, the most you have to lose is that it does not work. Just make sure you set it up so you can cut in a regular vacuum system if you need to.

    The other issue may be the controls. With ours, when you plug in and turn on the power brush the unit automatically turns on. The hard floot attachments also have switching built into them to turn on the unit. Without a regular unit you would have to turn on manually or figure out a control syatem to do it. There was a broken wire in my father’s system so he has to turn his on manually and it is a real PITA, especially when vacuuming In the areas of the house furthest from the unit. Leaving it on is not a good idea asmit would be sucking o. A closed system whenever you move outlets.

    #187581
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Ya, that’s what I figure as well. They will both be in the same room in the shop so it will be easy to add a proper vac if needed. I have sent a few emails off to different DC companies to get their take on it.

    I just can’t see how a 1000CFM + DC won’t compete with a 150CFM vac.

    The controls are a bit of a work around but very doable. I will wire it to central vac “standard” and then mess with the turning on issues after the fact. I don’t think it will be an issue.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #187839
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I wasn’t picturing that you were going to go that large with your cyclonic vac but I can’t fathom that not having enough juice to power a in home vac.

    Have you had a chance to check out the Laguna DCs? I haven’t used one but I was checking them out at Woodcraft. They seem extremely powerful and compact.

    http://www.lagunatools.com/dustcollectors

    #187850
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    A lot has to do with the sizeof the pipe. A dust collector with 4″ pipe will have high flow but low inches of lift. In a 1 1/ 2 to 2″ pipe, the flow will be less but the air will move faster and therefore have more lift.

    I didn’t understand the differences till this post, thanks. that makes perfect sense, and really I think a real DC would be super duty as a house vac too wouldn’t it? I know my shop vac sucks a lot harder with the smaller hose on it, Maybe I’m not helping LOL

    #187852
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Ya, I think it would too. I am going to do some quick test on my bros DC to see how it suck through a vac hose.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #187872
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Ya, that’s what I figure as well. They will both be in the same room in the shop so it will be easy to add a proper vac if needed. I have sent a few emails off to different DC companies to get their take on it.

    I just can’t see how a 1000CFM + DC won’t compete with a 150CFM vac.

    The controls are a bit of a work around but very doable. I will wire it to central vac “standard” and then mess with the turning on issues after the fact. I don’t think it will be an issue.

    Brad, one is pulling vacuum, the other is moving air. Probably has to do with the size of the inlet as to how much “vacuum” is being created.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #187875
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Bill, that makes sense. I just hope that the DC can create enuogh vacuum to be used in the house.

    Where I am confused, a DC pulls pick chunks of wood a long ways, and pulls all the fine dust from sanders ect. Why wouldn’t that work in the house for cheerios and dog hair?

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #188134

    Put hardwood or tile in the house with no carpet and a floor sweep to sweep all the debris into and you will be good to go! I think that you will have challenges getting a vacuum with the turbo brushes to run off a large trunk line. If you make it smaller, perhaps. But, I would also be concerned with small hoses not working with the CFM and either there not being enough airflow to suck up through the small hose or the smaller hose crushing under the pressure of a bigger unit. Maybe it will work, but I am not 100% convinced.

    Just by a Roomba or something and be done with it – you will not need to worry about a vac. I love mine!

    Orange County, CA

    #188372
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Where I am confused, a DC pulls pick chunks of wood a long ways, and pulls all the fine dust from sanders ect. Why wouldn’t that work in the house for cheerios and dog hair?

    I have been thinking about that since you originally posted. It maybe that the DC makes too much vacuum to be used as a vacuum cleaner. I have a couple of wall mounted vacs I use to detail cars. They have a ton of vacuum in fact sometimes too much, so that there is an adjustment on the attachment to open it up to outside air to reduce the vacuum and prevent sucking up the rug rather than the dirt. With a vacuum cleaner the trick is to have enough vacuum to pull up the dirt but not so much that you suck up the rug or the throw rug. Even on a hardwood floor too much vacuum would cause the sweeper attachment to stick to the floor rather than glide over it.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

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