dcsimg

Caulk stoppers

Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #681996
    Rob
    Pro
    Birmingham, Alabama

    The best thing I ever found was an aluminum wire tie that is normally used for top poles and strutts of chain link fences. The nails and screws rust and messs up the flow unless you have a stainless steel screw lying around and if you do $… you aren’t worried about the cost of a tube of caulk. The wire nuts get knocked off and it is always at a bad time when you find out. The aluminum is about 6″ long so I fold over the end about an inch to make a hook so it won’t go all the way inside. it is always deep enough to get to the loose stuff and works on all products -latex, silicone and adhesives. If it sets up near the end there is always a channel for the product to flow through. You can buy them by the dozen in the fencing area. Sure does make my life easier.

    #682031
    Clev08
    Pro

    I stick a nail in the end, or sometime I just let the end dry and pull the glob out next time.

    As far as the economics of caulk are concerned, it’s less about the cost of a tube of caulk and more about availability. If you keep throwing away partially used tubes then you may be more likely to not have any or enough when you need it.

    I totally agree with you, having a 1/2 tube with you sure beats needing to go to the store and buy a new one. My dad has a bucket of used caulk tubes, his problem is that they all sit around too long and he doesn’t throw them out when they go bad.

    #682070
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The best thing I ever found was an aluminum wire tie that is normally used for top poles and strutts of chain link fences.

    Sounds like a good idea, Thank you

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #682092
    Doobie
    Moderator

    The best thing I ever found was an aluminum wire tie that is normally used for top poles and strutts of chain link fences.

    Sounds like a good idea, Thank you

    What is this aluminum wire tie? I don’t know what Rob is referring to.

    #682146
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    The best thing I ever found was an aluminum wire tie that is normally used for top poles and strutts of chain link fences.

    Sounds like a good idea, Thank you

    What is this aluminum wire tie? I don’t know what Rob is referring to.


    https://www.amazon.com/ALUMINUM-Chain-Link-Fence-Wires/dp/B0761Z6NL6

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #682149
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I stick a nail in the end, or sometime I just let the end dry and pull the glob out next time.

    As far as the economics of caulk are concerned, it’s less about the cost of a tube of caulk and more about availability. If you keep throwing away partially used tubes then you may be more likely to not have any or enough when you need it.

    I totally agree with you, having a 1/2 tube with you sure beats needing to go to the store and buy a new one. My dad has a bucket of used caulk tubes, his problem is that they all sit around too long and he doesn’t throw them out when they go bad.

    But who goes to check on his partially used caulk every so often to see if it has gone bad and throw them away? No one. The time you check it is when you need it, which is when you find out it’s bad.

    So when you mobilize for a project, you end up getting new selant, new adhesives anyways because you don’t know if whatever you have is good to use, and even if it’s still good, whether it’s enough left for what you need.

    #682201
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    But who goes to check on his partially used caulk every so often to see if it has gone bad and throw them away? No one. The time you check it is when you need it, which is when you find out it’s bad.

    So true. You just hope the caulk stopper did its thing. I have found caulk over a year old still in good shape and other tubes 6 months old and hard as a rock. I usually keep full tubes of extra in the colors I use just to be safe. If the used one is toast I break out the new one.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #682592
    CB
    Pro

    I had bought a bunch of LePage caulk that had threaded removable nozzles last year. I thought the idea was that you could just have some replacement nozzles and threaded caps for them, but they didn’t sell such a thing. I thought it was a good idea, but do they in fact make and sell the replacement nozzles and caps, I don’t know.

    If you bought “a bunch”, then you may already have the spare replacement nozzles already…

    I purchase caulk (OSI Quad MAX, in colors) by the case and have it shipped to me. It has the threaded nozzles, just like the caulk I used to use (Tremco Dymonic FC, also in colors.

    When I’m installing a new window, or series of windows, or putting up siding, or whatever job requires caulking all day, I will unthread the nozzle from the freshly depleted tube, and reuse the old nozzle on new tube as I continue throughout the day. With each new tube I need to use, I’ll unthread and set aside the new nozzle, and thread in my old nozzle. At the end of the day, I will have collected a handful of brand new virgin nozzles. I put them in a zip lock bag so they stay clean and don’t tumble around all over the box, and set them aside.

    The last tube I use on any given day will more than likely be partially full. I use the caulk stoppers… I don’t know if that is what they are called, but they come in two different rod diameters, blue for skinny, yellow for thick. The rods are plastic, tapered, and about six inches long. They have a circular loop at the end that facilitates pulling the rod out of the caulk tube easier. They also have a conical hood that is about four inches long… which is at least 4 times longer than a wire nut! Suffice it to say, these things do not get knocked off.

    The conical shape of the hood is obvious, to fit over the nozzle. But the tapered shape of the rod (that looks like a pull pin to a toy grenade) provides a more air and moisture infiltration resistance the more the stopper is inserted into the nozzle. And the two different diameters of stopper rods is a useful resolution to the problem of different nozzle cuts that depend on the bead profile and layout speed desired.

    Nails or metal pins that are too skinny for the bead hole cut, and that are of a constant diameter rather than a taper, and that do not have a hood cap, may not be able to provide as much resistance to air and moisture infiltration at the mouth of the nozzle. Tapered body wood screws (they way they made screws 100 years ago, not the modern high tech screws of today) would make for a better seal around the open cut of a nozzle than a constant diameter pin, unless the diameter of the pin was exactly the diameter of the cut opening.

    Cost notwithstanding, I like these store bought (Lowes) caulk stoppers, even though it feels like they are the type of product one might find on “As Seen On TV”. Rarely do I fall for gimmicks hanging on clip strips at the end of the aisle, but I fell for this one, and so far, have not been disappointed. I started with two, and now have about a half dozen of each size.

    Now getting back to the zip lock bag of accumulated new nozzles… and that partial tube of caulk left over from my last job. In the event that too much time passes by between caulking days, it is possible that the nozzle on the partial tube will have set up. There is an important distinction however. The long stopper pin has reached all the way down to the pin pricked opening of the tube itself, so all that has really hardened is the caulk resident in the nozzle itself.

    Pulling the pin, a tunnel remains open for the good caulk that remained sealed and thus supple in the tube to get pushed through the tunnel created by the pin. However, the hydraulic force of pushing fresh caulk through the small pin orifice can dislodge the rubberized mass in the nozzle… so while flow may initiate ok on the first squeeze of the trigger, the flow may eventually be interrupted by a shift in the solidified mass in the nozzle.

    Not a problem.

    Unthread that old nozzle, dig in the zip lock bag for a new nozzle that you conserved by reusing the same nozzle in the previous caulk session, and screw the new nozzle on the partial tube. The caulk is then not wasted.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #742346
    mnak
    Pro

    just use cap

    #742358

    For me it depends , some of them come with a cap , but for the most part , I just drive a #8 or #10 screw in the tip , if I Know I’ll be using soon , if not I’ll just let it harden and toss in the trash 🤷‍♂️

    #742395

    I just wrap it with electrical tape. Seems about as good as anything. No matter what, extended periods of time without use and they go hard. Of course, I don’t use a lot of it on consecutive days as I am just a “home gamer”, so they tend to sit for a long time between uses.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
queries. 0.353 seconds