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BTP Review – Makita 18V X2 LXT Plunge Cut Saw (XPS01PTJ)

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  • #709300
    CB
    Pro

    @Dirty Thanks for reporting your experience comparing 5ah to 6ah.

    I went all in with 6ah from the start. I “resold” all the 5ah batteries that came included with the tools I recently bought immediately back to the tool dealer before taking delivery, at a cut throat allowance of only $42 each per 5ah battery brand new and loose, and replaced them with brand new blister packed 6ah batteries for $75 each. Why mess around?

    Once I learned that the 6ah batteries were the exact same size and weight of the 3, 4, and 5ah batteries, and that Makita’s next foreseeable bump in ah rating would be accompanied by a third row of cells, making for a larger (taller) 9ah battery (there are already 3 row knockoffs on Amazon rated at 9ah), it seemed that the 6ah battery is the highest and best utilization of the two row cell size, maximizing energy density for the given battery pack height.

    So I thought I might as well “standardize” on the 6ah, so that I will have consistent run times with any given battery I happen to grab. When only 2 bars showing on the indicator lights, I won’t have to look down at the label (since the Makita 2 row packs are all the same physical size) of the battery to check what ah the battery is rated for and mentally compensate what 2 bars means in terms of run time for each ah size of battery, for each type of tool. All the batteries will be the same ah, and the highest ah for the two row pack size.

    Having said all that, I wondered if the $33 premium (or difference in price) that I paid per battery for the upgrade would be really noticeable. I won’t have the chance to make the comparison myself, since I’m new to the LXT platform, and am starting out with all 6ah. I tried searching, and this thread, and the post I quoted, was the only commentary I found in the BTP archives.

    Speaking of taller, 3 cell row 9ah LXT compatible batteries…

    I also got that Rear Handled saw… felt so much easier in the hand… so much more natural to adapt to… versus most other cordless saws on the market… due to the Makita’s replication of the Mag 77 corded SkilSaw ergonomics.

    Did you notice the extra head room (or rather bottom room) for a taller battery, ie a third row of cells, between the battery sleds and the shoe plate of this saw? It seems like Makita pre baked into this saw’s design the ability to accommodate taller 9ah batteries that could be coming as OEM issue next year. In the meantime, I’ll bet the aftermarket BL-1890-B (3 row 9ah) will physically slide in there and clear the shoe plate right now.

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    #709391
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The battery life is a lot dependent on the sharpness of the blade. Dull blade not good in the battery saw. It’s not like the power cored that just push a dull blade all day long.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #709398
    CB
    Pro

    The battery life is a lot dependent on the sharpness of the blade. Dull blade not good in the battery saw. It’s not like the power cored that just push a dull blade all day long.

    I noticed the included blade is about the thinnest 24T blade I’ve seen.

    In your (or anyone reading) experiences with either the cordless rear handle saw or the cordless plunge cut tracksaw, are you finding that thinner blades are also making a difference in battery life of these saws?

    If so, does this mean you have a separate blade inventory for your cordless saws? In other words, do the typical Diablo standbys end up bogging down the cordless?

    I was bummed to find that Makita arbor is not diamond shaped on the rear handle, which means I have to run a separate blade inventory anyway, for each blade/tooth type, since the arbor holes are not interchangeable after any given blade’s diamond shaped arbor inset is removed.

    Now the question is, do I really have to make a point to buy blades as thin as the carbide tipped sheet metal that Makita ships with the saw?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #709408
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Makita is doing a new super thin blades. I have a few but haven’t tried them yet. A thinner blade will have less friction so less drag on the motor. The work I do with my rear handle saw is just to harsh for a thin blade. A thin blade will heat up and warp faster. I have been cutting sheer ply lately and just using cheap blades or what they give me.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #709409
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    If so, does this mean you have a separate blade inventory for your cordless saws?

    Once you start using the 18v Xs2 saw you wouldn’t go back to the corded skil unless your doing very heavy demo. Your days with the cord are over.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #709423
    CB
    Pro

    Once you start using the 18v Xs2 saw you wouldn’t go back to the corded skil unless your doing very heavy demo. Your days with the cord are over.

    You mean all that time I spent putting the cord joint ahead of my rips is over? Man that sent a chill up my spine just thinking about that kind of freedom. With all the time I save not dancing with the cord, I just might have enough spare time to come home early and clean up all the confetti the neighbors littered my little land with.

    On blades though, Home Depot was doing a 2 for 1 deal on the Diablo 60 tooth. A little slow, but talk about splinter free cutting on both sides of plywood sheet… and I got addicted.

    My first cut with that blade was to set edge for rabbeting a ship lap joint on blunt edge where there wasn’t one. When I saw how clean the kerf was, I thought, wow, how close can I make a second pass with this Diablo 60T? Mind you, this isn’t with a track saw, this is with a 30 year old Skil that has a stamped steel base plate… and you know how wavy those stamp steel shoes can get (versus today’s cast magnesium).

    I couldn’t believe the cut. Consider that the demarcations on the speedsquare shown in the photo are spaced at 1/8″, and compare that to the rib line that I left between kerfs, just to see if the blade would tear it out or not.

    I want to run these Diablo 60T’s in the cordless rear handle, but I’m not sure the Makita will handle them. I guess I’ll find out tommorrow.

    .

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #709491
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Just arriving this morning is my new Makita plunge cut track saw and short rail with twist clamps.

    Won’t likely be using it for a while, but it was something I had been scouting a good deal on for quite some time.

    Nice thing was that I ended up with 5.0 Ah batteries rather than the 4.0s in the add. The fellow at Tegs was right about the 5.0s after all.

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