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Boral truexterior

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  • #605463
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Exterior trim details are apart of just about every house. Whether it be a classic look or modern look, houses have to be finished off and closed up from the elements and look good asteticly. Up until late the main way of doing this is with wood. Freeze boards, rake boards, brick molding, corbels, crown molding,columns,siding and so on have all been made out of wood for a very long time. As the demand for houses continue and will always be a demand so does the products to build them. With that ways of producing things like the wood used in the aforementioned details being sped up the wood is no longer as permeable to the elements as the old growth lumber used in the houses of old. Luckily the advancement of technology has made it possible to create products that are not affected so much by the elements.

    Vinyl, pvc, cement, and other composites have made their way into various methods of how we trim out houses. Most of these even though being very impervious to the elements have their own drawbacks. For example pvc trim, such as azek, can be harder to work with and keep strait. I have heard carpenters liken it to a wet noodle. Also it has to be avoided painting it dark colors because it will warp from the heat of the sun. There are also various brands of cement based materials. They usually need special blades or tools to be able to cut this material. Also the dust from cutting it can be very dangerous. It’s infact so dangerous that new osha laws are going into effect in June of 2017 limiting the amount of exposure aloud to silica dust. Boral on the other hand doesn’t have as many or as big of drawbacks compared to some of the other wood alternatives.

    Boral is a composite material that is made out of 70% recycled material, a lot of which I understand is from fly ash. In the last several years I have been a part of quite a few projects that have used boral for a large part of the exterior trim and even some interior trim that was susceptible to moister like breadboard in bathrooms and around showers. Boral is very stable and won’t rot and move. We have beautiful houses that we have done 5 years ago that the exterior trim looks as good as the day we installed it. Boral comes in lots of different moldings, sidings and many standard 1x and 2x sizes in 16′ lengths. Boral can be cut and worked pretty much the same way you would cut and work with wood. Sometimes it seems even easier than working with wood because the blade seems to go through the product so easily. Also joints such as scarf joints can be sanded together easier than wood to make the joint virtually disapear after being painted. The look of boral is one of the best out of the alternatives, there is no over exaggerated wood grain and the corners and profiles are all very crisp, clean, and sharp unlike what seems to be very rounded corners or other products. After the boral is up and installed I can not find any draw backs from my point of view. It looks great and seems that it will last a very long time with little maintenance.

    There are a couple of drawbacks when installing it however. True it can be installed with the sake woodworking tools that you have but for any blades that will be cutting boral you want to have a dedicated boral blade. Now you don’t have to go out and buy a new blade for your saw, I would actually advise against that. Boral seems to cut very very easily even with a dull blade. So I would recommend using an old blade that has had plenty of use cutting wood. Just don’t plan on using that blade for wood unless you are trying to start a fire. Same thing goes for router bits, o would avoid using those high dollar bits. If you are cutting it with any non carbide tipped blades, such as a high speed steel jigsaw blade, plan on using plenty of those. One more thing is the dust. The sawdust that boral creates is very fine and goes everywhere. I would highly recommend using some kind of dust extraction even when cutting outside. Also cleaning your tools as often as you can when working with boral is pretty important. In a few instances where this was neglected the dust made it impossible to move the table saw blade up and down because of the dust getting into all the gears.

    To sum things up boral is a great product and I plan on using it when I eventually build my own house for the peace of mind and hassle free maintenance that it provides. It’s a bit messy to work with but taking the right precautions and set up its a breeze to install.

    #605492
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Thanks for the info Austin. I tend to use treated lumber, cedar or PVC trim, depending on the application and if I am trying to match existing trims. PVC has never been much fun to work with and I feel like it looks a bit fake, even with a wood grain finish.

    How is the Boral aesthetically?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
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    #605493
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    As far as looks after its painted you can’t tell its not wood. It doesn’t have that fake look at all like some of the PVC and fiber cement trims

    #605498
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Very timely information, @Austin, thank you. I will be doing some exterior restoration this summer and material is way up at the top of my list now. I’ll be checking out availability tomorrow.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #605511
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    boral has yet to show up in my region, we primaritly use wood trim that is pressure treated lodgepole pine and is then painted or otherwise using pvc.

    i have used concrete trim in the past but found it to be not just harder to cut but just plain difficult to work with.. it was very short lived in this region as even the james hartie reps found it not very reliable in my climate so they promoted using either the wood trim or pvc

    pvc is definiely not a product that you want to cut alot of without dust extraction.. most of the exterior trim i do is with pvc..

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #605519
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I saw the Tru Exterior trim at the International Builders show a couple weeks ago. It looks like a great product. It comes in almost any size and does not require the clearances to grade and concrete that LP or Hardie do. It is much more dimensionally stable than PBC with temperature variations.

    I have already priced it to use on one project and plan on using it more in the future.

    #605526
    Clev08
    Pro

    That stuff does make a mess, but it is pretty easy to work with. My dad and I used it when we replaced the rotted trim boards on the end of the roof(see picture below). We used a circular saw, hole saw, and sandpaper to put the detail on the ends just like we would have done with wood.

    The other picture is a house we replaced the siding and trim on the entire house. The homeowner showed us some pictures from the internet of what they wanted the front door to look like and we ordered trim accordingly. There are a ton of profile options available for this stuff.

    Just like @Austin I plan to use this product when I build my own home someday.

    #605600
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    boral has yet to show up in my region,

    Nobody stocks it out here either. More than likely MiraTEC works better out here in this climate.

    #605650

    Thanks, Austin! This review has some awesome tips for working with TruExterior Trim. We’re glad you’ve found so much success with our product!

    #605664
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    great topic austin and really tight work.. only one question though.. with your siding shown its right down on the roof shingles,, im guessing slate… is there any concern with water being wicked up by the siding and shortening the life of it.

    do to freeze thaw climate im in its better building practice to keep all composite or engineerd siding prodcuts up off a roofline like that 2″

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #605671
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    No shouldn’t be an issue with this product at all. You can even put it right in contact with the ground and not have any moister wicked up. @jkirk

    #605688
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The wicking or lack thereof is what impressed me about this product. It also does not require flashing for horizontal surfaces, which makes it ideal for porch columns and things like that.

    #605699
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    no flashing at all?? what about in behind as the standard practice for so many years.. to ensure stopping water migration in behind windows.. wind driven rain can still get behind any siding

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #605703
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    You would want to flash any where you do not have a through material behind it. I was thinking more like a trim around the base of a column that the column wrap is continuous behind.

    Trims over the head of a door or window you would definitely want to flash.

    #605725
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    yah gotcha.. i dont think ive ever seen anyone flash columns.. the only thin i do prefer doing is to have any mouldings that project out to have a sloped top instead of flat so water does not sit on top fo them

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #605734
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Even with the sloped top, LP does not hold up well on a column in my experience.

    #606257
    Doobie
    Moderator

    boral has yet to show up in my region

    . I’ll be checking out availability tomorrow.

    Have you guys found anybody here in Canada that carries this? The only thing I can find is from their website here…

    http://www.boralamerica.com/TruExterior/About/truexterior-news/canadian-stone-industries-adds-boral-truexterior-trim-to-distribution-offerings

    The ‘where to buy’ tool only pulls up places accross the border even though it takes postal codes.

    But if you go to what I ‘think’ is that sole Canadian Distributors website, you can find one/some of the 350 listed retailers/suppliers near you hopefully.

    http://www.canadianstone.ca/#sthash.Ute69yJE.dpbs

    I need to look at this product more myself. Thanks for posting Austin.

    Never heard of this before.

    #606258
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    kevin, this is the first ive heard of boral, mind you im in the atlantic region so theres a ton of stuff we dont see here and if we do theres typically a huge delay to get it… zip panel still isnt here yet and no one knows about it at the lumber yard

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #606283
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Austin I did a porch with it over the summer. I posted quite a bit on the pros and cons as well.

    Bottle line I would use it again no Problem. It’s Unique.

    The dust is a hazard to your lungs and tools. So becautious

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #606316
    Doobie
    Moderator

    kevin, this is the first ive heard of boral, mind you im in the atlantic region so theres a ton of stuff we dont see here and if we do theres typically a huge delay to get it… zip panel still isnt here yet and no one knows about it at the lumber yard

    Not sure how close these places are to you Jeff, but try these places.

    http://www.canadianstone.ca/find-a-dealer/?pagen=0&wppl_post=dealers&dealer-types=186&wppl_address=B3H+1R4&wppl_distance=300&submit=Submit&wppl_form=1&action=wppl_post#sthash.KuQYT9SZ.dpbs

    Edit: That Canadian Stone is listed as a Boral Truexterior distributor, but coincidentally, that distributor carries a Boral named line of stone products as well. So that search i did for you selecting the Boral product on the drop down list of their ‘where to buy’ search tool is likely only showing the Boral Stone line of products and where to get them.

    Still, if they are the distributor anyways, you may want to call those listed places up but make sure it is the Boral Truexterior prod and not the stone prod they are carrying 9r bring in tjat you are talking about.

    Edit #2: Just figured something out, Boral Stone and Boral TruExterior are the same company with Boral Stone being the much larger product line being widely distributed and the TruExterior a fringe product that may have little to no distribution here in Canada thru Canadian Stone.

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