dcsimg

Black Friday Tool Blowout Thread

This topic contains 189 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  Miamicuse 6 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 161 through 180 (of 190 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #708102

    Doobie
    Pro

    Come to think of it, Harbor Freight’s made in China cheap tools like to use American cities in the branding, like Pittsburg hand tools, Chicago Electric power tools, Portland chainsaws, I don’t know why, did they think buyers of these tools would be misled into thinking those are tools made in the USA several generations ago?

    The workboot company Keen who is a sponsor here uses city names a lot in their lines of shoes and boots. Just that the ones sold here in Canada they use Canadian city names.

    #708118

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Come to think of it, Harbor Freight’s made in China cheap tools like to use American cities in the branding, like Pittsburg hand tools, Chicago Electric power tools, Portland chainsaws, I don’t know why, did they think buyers of these tools would be misled into thinking those are tools made in the USA several generations ago?

    The workboot company Keen who is a sponsor here uses city names a lot in their lines of shoes and boots. Just that the ones sold here in Canada they use Canadian city names.

    It gives you the home town- country feeling.. Some of the Keens are made here in the USofA .. But for that chinese crap hidding behind a American name I think is the lowest.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #708139

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    @cb another great read , I think I’ll just go outside and Panther down a few 🌲 and shrubs
    LoL ,

    #708158

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    It gives you the home town- country feeling.. Some of the Keens are made here in the USofA .. But for that chinese crap hidding behind a American name I think is the lowest.

    I visited Taiwan two years ago, and my wife was in a store looking at some leather bags that’s made in Italy, after I looked at it I asked the salesman where it’s made, he told me it’s made in China. I told my wife, the called the name of the brand “MADE IN ITALY”, the product wasn’t made in Italy LOL.

    #708163

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Was at Home Depot looking at floor tile. Red white and blue box and called USA TILE . Made in China ! lol

    #708178

    CB
    Pro

    @Dirty : You asked “Where did the info come from?”

    The info was synthesized from reading an investors call report and forward looking statements in securities filings; reading a news article published in a Hong Kong news outlet and another article published in a Wisconsin newspaper, stumbling upon a message board where former Stanley Black & Decker employees took a few disgruntled swipes at their former boss, and, the docket of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia – 26 F. Supp. 2d 834 (E.D. Va. 1998) filed November 16, 1998.

    Other than the clearly delineated quotation from that court case, called “Findings of Fact”, all the other words and opinions expressed were my own. I am not a shill for Milwaukee. I don’t own any of their cordless tools. Almost all of the Milwaukee tools I do have are decades old… a full size panel saw, 3 Super Magnum grinders, 2 Hole Shooters, 2 Super Sawzalls, and a drywall screw gun… all corded.

    I recently bought into a new battery tool system (my 4th battery system, my 2nd LiION battery system)… despite Milwaukee’s meteoric market penetration and growth (19% organic growth this past year, where “organic” means growth without an acquisition of another company). And that is just the Milwaukee line of TTI. When TTI bought the Milwaukee brand from Atlas Copco, annual sales were 500 Million. Now, annual sales for Milwaukee exceed 2 Billion. That’s quadrupling revenue in just 10 years, despite a very competent field of competition in the likes of Bosch, Makita, Hilti, Metabo, MaFell, Festool, DeWalt, Hitachi, etc.

    In 2007, Milwaukee had only 3% of the cordless tool market. Now Milwaukee is #1, just like DeWalt became #1 in the late ’90’s. How can one not be curious how this happens? It is fascinating. Scary actually. You just know that somebody is getting steamrolled out there, but who? And is it just sour grapes if they complain, or is something shady going on? Then again, look at the product: Is it better? Is the product bringing new solutions and capabilities to the table? Few would argue the latter point.

    My motivation to adopt yet another new battery system was application driven, not marketing driven, but despite the application I was interested in becoming more efficient at doing, I still waffled and wavered over buying into a new battery system, as that painfully reminded my dwindling bank account that my previously acquired LiIon battery system from two years ago was a cost driven mistake in judgment that I didn’t want to repeat.

    That’s why, before buying into Makita’s 18V battery system last week, I took a long hard look at Milwaukee. Anyone buying into a new battery tool system has to. One cannot ignore that Milwaukee is assertively and aggressively dominating the professional tool market, trade by trade. Hydraulic crimp solutions. PEX solutions. Not just another saw or drill.

    Despite this fascination with how Milwaukee has evolved, I still chose Makita, because Makita’s history of conservative consistency, combined with their never before seen innovation, combined with their gift of bringing prohibitively costly German tool solutions down to planet earth where working people can afford them (eg, Makita’s $2K 12″ beam planer rivals Mafell’s $5K 12″ beam planer; Makita’s $350 track saw rivals Mafell’s $1,500 and Festool’s $800 track saws), and, most influentially, Makita made a tool that I was looking for, and no one else did.

    Having now bought that tool, I’ve already ordered two other tools (cordless spiral cutter and the sub compact black recip that can fit in the 14″ of space between stud bays) that work with this new to me battery system, and the charger hasn’t even come in the mail yet.

    #708179

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    @Dirty : You asked “Where did the income come from?”

    Oh I know where the income comes from.. chinese slave labor apposed to American labor. It’s a great study to dig into the chinese factories and the camps around it that house school and feed the people.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #708188

    CB
    Pro

    @cb another great read , I think I’ll just go outside and Panther down a few and shrubs
    LoL ,

    Funny you should say that, because that is all I use my Panther for… limb cutting trees and shrubs.

    I bought it new, 30 odd years ago, the week it came out. I happened to be at the tool store (back when tool stores were commonplace) when it was put on display… and it was a complete impulse purchase.

    In use, I never liked it compared to Sawzalls. I can’t explain why. Vibration maybe? I’ve tried all the settings and speeds, from straight to mid orbital to full orbital. It was the orbital action that set it apart from the other recips of the day. I don’t think Milwaukee introduced an orbital until years later. I have that orbital also, and prefer it over the Bosch, but prefer my older non orbital classic Sawzall (metal bodied center section) over both.

    Not long after buying it, I just put it away, with the intent to sell it. But I never got around to it. Now I might as well save it to go to a more appreciative Bosch enthusiast/collector one day, which wouldn’t be me.

    Collectors are out there. I recently read of one guy who had over 300 framing hammers, all new, in his collection, each filed away in sealed stacking plastic boxes. I stumbled across an article detailing his collection while I was trying to find out why Hart hammer doesn’t sell a wooden handle California Framer anymore. (Come to find out, TTI bought the Hart and the Stiletto brands, and now TTI’s Milwaukee brand is selling hammers also).

    Anyway, this hammer aficionado’s framing hammer collection was a walk down memory lane… “oh yeah, I remember when so and so brought one of those to work and broke it the first day… oh yeah, I remember wanting one of those but it was so expensive… oh year I remember when everyone gathered around to look at that one when someone showed up with it”… I was rather thankful that someone out there was crazy enough to curate an example of each trendy and innovative framing hammer that hit (haha) the market over the last 40 years… because seeing them all together at once was informative and interesting… and also helped me figure out which ones disappeared and why.

    (I still use a Vaughan triple 9, with a custom modified, longer and thicker handle that I turn down to fit the 999 head so that the edges of the head nest into the ledge made from turning down the hickory… handles don’t break no mo)

    I often wonder what archeologists 1,000 years from now will think of the “advanced” tools of our generation.

    #708189

    CB
    Pro

    @Dirty : You asked “Where did the income come from?”

    Oh I know where the income comes from.. chinese slave labor apposed to American labor. It’s a great study to dig into the chinese factories and the camps around it that house school and feed the people.

    Sorry, I had meant to say “info”, like you previously asked, not “income”. I will edit my post accordingly.

    During the industrial revolution of the United States… there were camps that housed, schooled, and feed the workers… who were forced to return the wages they were paid right back to the industrialist who paid them. Company towns. Mining towns. Recirculating mirco economies where every raise in pay was negated by an even higher rise in price to rent on land also owned by the business, and shop in stores owned by the business as well.

    Looking up Pottersville today, all the hits are about a comedy movie that I didn’t know existed until a second ago. But I remember learning about the real Pottersville… which typified the closed loop captured control where workers were silently enslaved in an indentured system cloaked under a more sophisticated pretense than the outright slavery of the previous agricultural revolution upon which the USA’s economy was first established.

    All such systems take advantage of the less fortunate. And all such systems seem inevitable, persisting in all economies, only more cleverly layered with ever increasing disguises in the more advanced societies. There are still the haves.. and the have mores. There is still a disproportionate distribution of privilege and freedom that is not directly connected to how hard one works.

    When everything is manufactured by machine, including automated housing pods… will we be still searching for Black Friday tool blowout sales?

    #708194

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    When everything is manufactured by machine, including automated housing pods… will we be still searching for Black Friday tool blowout sales?

    I say yes. Look at Star Trek. Everything is automated on their star ships, food is replicated, no one is ever hungry…but I bet there are times the door doesn’t slide open when you approach, or the elevator goes down instead of up when you say “bridge”, and they need someone to fix them with power tools.

    #708203

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    @cb another great read , I think I’ll just go outside and Panther down a few and shrubs
    LoL ,

    Funny you should say that, because that is all I use my Panther for… limb cutting trees and shrubs.

    I bought it new, 30 odd years ago, the week it came out. I happened to be at the tool store (back when tool stores were commonplace) when it was put on display… and it was a complete impulse purchase.

    In use, I never liked it compared to Sawzalls. I can’t explain why. Vibration maybe? I’ve tried all the settings and speeds, from straight to mid orbital to full orbital. It was the orbital action that set it apart from the other recips of the day. I don’t think Milwaukee introduced an orbital until years later. I have that orbital also, and prefer it over the Bosch, but prefer my older non orbital classic Sawzall (metal bodied center section) over both.

    Not long after buying it, I just put it away, with the intent to sell it. But I never got around to it. Now I might as well save it to go to a more appreciative Bosch enthusiast/collector one day, which wouldn’t be me.

    Collectors are out there. I recently read of one guy who had over 300 framing hammers, all new, in his collection, each filed away in sealed stacking plastic boxes. I stumbled across an article detailing his collection while I was trying to find out why Hart hammer doesn’t sell a wooden handle California Framer anymore. (Come to find out, TTI bought the Hart and the Stiletto brands, and now TTI’s Milwaukee brand is selling hammers also).

    Anyway, this hammer aficionado’s framing hammer collection was a walk down memory lane… “oh yeah, I remember when so and so brought one of those to work and broke it the first day… oh yeah, I remember wanting one of those but it was so expensive… oh year I remember when everyone gathered around to look at that one when someone showed up with it”… I was rather thankful that someone out there was crazy enough to curate an example of each trendy and innovative framing hammer that hit (haha) the market over the last 40 years… because seeing them all together at once was informative and interesting… and also helped me figure out which ones disappeared and why.

    (I still use a Vaughan triple 9, with a custom modified, longer and thicker handle that I turn down to fit the 999 head so that the edges of the head nest into the ledge made from turning down the hickory… handles don’t break no mo)

    I often wonder what archeologists 1,000 years from now will think of the “advanced” tools of our generation.

    Wow that’s a nice sawzal and looks like it’s in mint condition.

    I remember something about that guy with the hammer collection. Some pretty cool hammers.

    #708374

    I was in HD yesterday and came across a 4 pack of Bessey bar clamps – 2 @ 6 inches and 2 @ 12″ for $20 and then had a 10% coupon to use too. Individually they sold for just under $12. Perhaps they have some more.

    #708409

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Is it over yet

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #708413

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I was in HD yesterday and came across a 4 pack of Bessey bar clamps – 2 @ 6 inches and 2 @ 12″ for $20 and then had a 10% coupon to use too. Individually they sold for just under $12. Perhaps they have some more.

    That’s a good deal Lon.
    I will try and check it out this week.

    #708417

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I was in HD yesterday and came across a 4 pack of Bessey bar clamps – 2 @ 6 inches and 2 @ 12″ for $20 and then had a 10% coupon to use too. Individually they sold for just under $12. Perhaps they have some more.

    That’s a good deal Lon.
    I will try and check it out this week.

    Langevin et Foret has the same clamps with $23.

    #708419

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I was in HD yesterday and came across a 4 pack of Bessey bar clamps – 2 @ 6 inches and 2 @ 12″ for $20 and then had a 10% coupon to use too. Individually they sold for just under $12. Perhaps they have some more.

    That’s a good deal Lon.
    I will try and check it out this week.

    Langevin et Foret has the same clamps with $23.

    Thanks. I don’t believe I’ve heard of that place.

    #708430

    Doobie
    Pro

    Langevin et Foret has the same clamps with $23.

    Thanks. I don’t believe I’ve heard of that place.

    Seriously! They are the French Quebec version of Lee Valley basically.

    http://www.langevinforest.com/fr

    Pricey, but they carry a lot of hard to find woodworking stuff.

    #708443

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Langevin et Foret has the same clamps with $23.

    Thanks. I don’t believe I’ve heard of that place.

    Seriously! They are the French Quebec version of Lee Valley basically.

    http://www.langevinforest.com/fr

    Pricey, but they carry a lot of hard to find woodworking stuff.

    Thanks. I’m not really a woodworking type of guy.
    Thanks for the info I’ll have to check it out

    Just saw, they are not to far away from Tony Tools. I might try and make a double trip later this week.

    #708451

    CB
    Pro

    Careful on those Bessey bar clamps that are part of Home Depot’s special buys. I bought a bunch a couple of years ago… and it wasn’t just that they were all Made in China (some Bessey clamps are still made in Germany, but not these).

    It was that the bar clamps I picked up at Harbor Freight some 15 years earlier were actually better made than these prettier looking Bessey clamps.

    In particular, when you pull the red plastic boot off the foot, the casting is poured short, or uneven, or too thin (like I said, I bought a bunch, I think around 24 of them, so I had a lot of samples to choose from). The castings were so uneven and lop sided, the plastic feet often fell off, but the castings without the feet were so uneven and half poured, they didn’t have enough purchase on the material being clamped.

    I ended up culling three clamps and took them back to Home Depot. Of course, the special buy clamps were all gone, but they let me exchange the bad clamps for the individually sold clamps of equivalent size that they had in stock. It was a big deal as far as their paper work went, but the clamps looked bad enough (once the boots were off) to speak my case for me.

    The individually sold clamps, of the same size, type, and style, were still way different in build quality (the casting in particular) than the “Special Buy” blister pack clamps. Lesson learned.

    #708454

    Doobie
    Pro

    Careful on those Bessey bar clamps that are part of Home Depot’s special buys. I bought a bunch a couple of years ago… and it wasn’t just that they were all Made in China (some Bessey clamps are still made in Germany, but not these).

    While some companies have farmed out products to be made in China with minimal quality loss, like most Bessey is not one of them imo. Shame, they make such good German made stuff. They should have come up with an alternate brand naming so as to not tarnish their reputation of their good name.

Viewing 20 posts - 161 through 180 (of 190 total)

The topic ‘Black Friday Tool Blowout Thread’ is closed to new replies.

queries. 0.523 seconds