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Best Solution for this Mess?

This topic contains 30 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  theamcguy 1 year ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)
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  • #674940

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    After seeing the big picture it looks like it was set up to have stone on it like on the corner. I still stand by flashing it. Don’t see much other choice without moving all the service entrance .

    #675067

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    filling the block with concrete would be a good idea.

    Other than adding to the cost I really don’t see any benefit to filling the block. Am I missing something ?

    Yes,, it would keep rats and small animals from living in there. It would make it a lot stronger and also you could set J-bolts in it to hold down the wall.

    That and keep the cavities from filling up water and causing the foundation to fail!

    Question – is the siding also the exterior sheeting?

    I am another advocate of flashing.I would flash down over the block (after filling with concrete/grout), add a PVC trim board to the bottom, flash the top of the PVC board, then set my new siding on top.

    There is Celotex board under it, but yes the siding serves as the sheeting as well.

    As it turns out, another side of the garage is in worse shape yet. I’ll be furring the wall out a (the width of a 2×4 wall actually) on top of that bump out on the foundation. The cores will be filled, then I’m adding 4″ block on top to keep the new framing well above grade. The block will fit onto the foundation perfectly and allow the new siding to run flush, rather than have that odd trim piece.

    Speaking of odd trim pieces…This new faux wall only be 8″ high, as that all the higher it really needs to be, so the trim detail that used be at the bottom of the wall will now be replicated at the intersection of the old wall on its original plan and the new furred out wall.

    While it will definitely look different than the rest of the house, this repair will be much less extensive than trying to demo a load bearing wall and rebuilding the damn thing…

    Look at the rot! The picture isn’t from the best angle, but you can see that the window leaked really badly (as did that crappy trim detail at the bottom of the wall). There was a leak at the belly band too…Given that the whole area is basically junk now, I’m going to repair what I can reasonably take care of, then fur out the wall and reside.

    Attachments:

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #675079

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Man it just keeps growing bigger and bigger lol…

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #675100

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Jon that sure is a mess. Water damage is the worst; too bad that window leaked so bad causing all that damage.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #675110

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    filling the block with concrete would be a good idea.

    Other than adding to the cost I really don’t see any benefit to filling the block. Am I missing something ?

    Yes,, it would keep rats and small animals from living in there. It would make it a lot stronger and also you could set J-bolts in it to hold down the wall.

    That and keep the cavities from filling up water and causing the foundation to fail!

    Question – is the siding also the exterior sheeting?

    I am another advocate of flashing.I would flash down over the block (after filling with concrete/grout), add a PVC trim board to the bottom, flash the top of the PVC board, then set my new siding on top.

    There is Celotex board under it, but yes the siding serves as the sheeting as well.

    As it turns out, another side of the garage is in worse shape yet. I’ll be furring the wall out a (the width of a 2×4 wall actually) on top of that bump out on the foundation. The cores will be filled, then I’m adding 4″ block on top to keep the new framing well above grade. The block will fit onto the foundation perfectly and allow the new siding to run flush, rather than have that odd trim piece.

    Speaking of odd trim pieces…This new faux wall only be 8″ high, as that all the higher it really needs to be, so the trim detail that used be at the bottom of the wall will now be replicated at the intersection of the old wall on its original plan and the new furred out wall.

    While it will definitely look different than the rest of the house, this repair will be much less extensive than trying to demo a load bearing wall and rebuilding the damn thing…

    Look at the rot! The picture isn’t from the best angle, but you can see that the window leaked really badly (as did that crappy trim detail at the bottom of the wall). There was a leak at the belly band too…Given that the whole area is basically junk now, I’m going to repair what I can reasonably take care of, then fur out the wall and reside.

    The stuff you get into once you peel back the skin!

    Seems like a very sound plan for remediation. How high will the 4″ block go above grade?

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #675134

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Seems like a very sound plan for remediation. How high will the 4″ block go above grade?

    Just one course, which will leave the bottom plate about 10-12″ off of the ground depending on the exact spot along the side of the house.

    Now if only the damn weather would cooperate! I’m supposed to be doing the block work today, but its looking like a rain out…

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #675751

    CB
    Pro

    I zoomed the photo up to 400%, and didn’t see any Z flashing at the top plate, legged under the attic siding still remaining? It looks like the builder relied on caulk above the transitional trim piece that you had to peel off?

    There definitely should be some Z flashing between the attic siding and the wall siding, otherwise it will happen all over again.

    #675776

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    There definitely should be some Z flashing between the attic siding and the wall siding, otherwise it will happen all over again.

    Sometimes we have to think of the future carpenters that will need some work too.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #675778

    CB
    Pro

    Sometimes we have to think of the future carpenters that will need some work too.

    As long as it lasts 10 years and one day I suppose, license jurisdiction depending.

    But rain and exposure direction depending, it might not even last 10 years without flashing, as panel quality isn’t what it used to be.

    #675810

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    As it turns out, another side of the garage is in worse shape yet. I’ll be furring the wall out a (the width of a 2×4 wall actually) on top of that bump out on the foundation. The cores will be filled, then I’m adding 4″ block on top to keep the new framing well above grade. The block will fit onto the foundation perfectly and allow the new siding to run flush, rather than have that odd trim piece.

    That sounds like the correct solution for that. I wasn’t crazy about the offset angled flashing option myself.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #675864

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Sometimes we have to think of the future carpenters that will need some work too.

    LOL on that one Dirty. Gotta give a workin brother a hand.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

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