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Belt Sander

This topic contains 91 replies, has 41 voices, and was last updated by  smallerstick 2 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 92 total)
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  • #564315

    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    is it just me but i don’t see the belt sander on the bosch website, did they discontinue them?

    Yes. It was discontinued a couple years ago.

    It seams that they have gone the same route as festool saying that an aggressive ro is better that a belt sander. But I rather use a belt sander. Its much more predicable.

    Interesting, I have almost enough points for a 1250DEVS, but I think I’d still like to keep my old belt sander, but I will try them in some head-to-head tasks when I get a chance 🙂

    I have no doubt that it would do very well if thats what you want to use and I have tried to use a rotex to scribe and just didnt like it. I was always afraid of it jumping and ruining the finished edge. I am just used to the big ole belt sander.

    #564318

    This is the one I bought not so long ago … not really used it in earnest yet though.

    The Black and Decker “Dragster”

    Carpenter and Joiner

    Joiner ... a person who constructs the wooden components of a building, such as stairs, doors, and door and window frames.

    Carpenter ... cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork.

    1970 ... to present.

    #564368

    I use my porter-cable 3×21 on scribing molding or cabinets . The other big use is building counters out of Formica .

    Always willing to learn .

    #564549

    Belt Sanders are the ideal for woodwork. It consists of an electric motor that turns a pair of drums on which a continuous loop of sandpaper is mounted.Belt sanders can have a very aggressive action on wood and are normally used only for the beginning stages of the sanding process, or used to rapidly remove material.

    #564553

    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    I keep being told by my co-workers that I need a belt sander if I really want to make various sizes of wooden caulking slick fast and properly. I’ve never used one before but sure it would be helpful to have on hand.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #564584

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    This is the one I bought not so long ago … not really used it in earnest yet though.

    I think I may have said this before but that is a very nice belt sander. I ma sure it works great, but what impresses me about that model is the design. It has some style.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #573491

    Makita is pretty helpful for, I used to with makita

    #573525

    I have an old Makita 3X18 that works well, but I mostly use it to shape the edges of planes that will need lots of work by hand. Makes an eighth disappear in an instant

    #573659

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I have an old Makita 3X18 that works well, but I mostly use it to shape the edges of planes that will need lots of work by hand. Makes an eighth disappear in an instant

    that is an awesome idea, when you shape the edge of the plane you mean the angled portion? and not the flat? I’ve wondered about using the belt sander to flatten a plane blade body like a make shift metal thicknesser.

    #573694

    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    I have an old Makita 3X18 that works well, but I mostly use it to shape the edges of planes that will need lots of work by hand. Makes an eighth disappear in an instant

    that is an awesome idea, when you shape the edge of the plane you mean the angled portion? and not the flat? I’ve wondered about using the belt sander to flatten a plane blade body like a make shift metal thicknesser.

    I use a belt sander to put an edge on my crappy chisel and it works great. With a plane or chisel after the initial flattening of the bottom you shouldn’t ever have to do a lot of work to it unless you really screw it up some how.

    #573738

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I have an old Makita 3X18 that works well, but I mostly use it to shape the edges of planes that will need lots of work by hand. Makes an eighth disappear in an instant

    that is an awesome idea, when you shape the edge of the plane you mean the angled portion? and not the flat? I’ve wondered about using the belt sander to flatten a plane blade body like a make shift metal thicknesser.

    That might be a good idea. Do they sell belts of sandpaper in the grit needed for that work? Maybe it’s a custom order. Or maybe I am blind. I wonder if it would only work for planes whose lengths are smaller than the plated section of the sander. I’d be nervous about not having a steady enough hand to flatten a sole with one.

    I have the 3×18 Ridgid, which does okay. Doesn’t have that “dragster” look, though. That’s for sure.

    #573741

    I had a $100 Ridgid one for a year and a half and even though I didn’t use it too hard one of the plastic gears self destructed. I couldn’t find the receipt and the warranty people gave me a hard time. I ended up getting frustrated and tossing it out. This is one of the reasons I don’t buy any tools made by TTI any more.

    I borrowed an old PC from my brother for a while and now I’m looking to pick up the Bosch half sheet sander.

    #573765

    I keep being told by my co-workers that I need a belt sander if I really want to make various sizes of wooden caulking slick fast and properly. I’ve never used one before but sure it would be helpful to have on hand.

    After watching you use a knife to make yours . The sander would also be a lot safer Chris .

    Always willing to learn .

    #574002

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I had a $100 Ridgid one for a year and a half and even though I didn’t use it too hard one of the plastic gears self destructed.

    Not good, I don’t know why they would use a plastic gear in a situation such a belt sander. Hassle on warranties only turn people off from tools. All tools have a manufacturing date code on them and could be used to help establish the tools age.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #574016

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    My old partners dad had the Makita, we used it numerous times
    Was great for trimming down counter tops after we scribe them with the wall, and even used in installing basement subfloor,
    Great tool,

    #574034

    I have an old Makita 3X18 that works well, but I mostly use it to shape the edges of planes that will need lots of work by hand. Makes an eighth disappear in an instant

    that is an awesome idea, when you shape the edge of the plane you mean the angled portion? and not the flat? I’ve wondered about using the belt sander to flatten a plane blade body like a make shift metal thicknesser.

    That might be a good idea. Do they sell belts of sandpaper in the grit needed for that work? Maybe it’s a custom order. Or maybe I am blind. I wonder if it would only work for planes whose lengths are smaller than the plated section of the sander. I’d be nervous about not having a steady enough hand to flatten a sole with one.

    I have the 3×18 Ridgid, which does okay. Doesn’t have that “dragster” look, though. That’s for sure.

    I flatten the back if its in really bad shape, then take it to a stone and eventually to various grits

    I also use it to shape the initial bevel. I have a cheap stanley guide that I let roll on the sandpaper directly. It is being destroyed by the belt gradually, so I would not use a good guide, but for a $5 amazon buy… who cares?

    I have grits up to 600 for my belt, which is what I use for this, before I finish off with the finer stuff. Good to shape it, but won’t get a scary sharp edge. Good enough for rough chisels, axes, and pry tools though

    #574042

    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    I had a $100 Ridgid one for a year and a half and even though I didn’t use it too hard one of the plastic gears self destructed.

    Not good, I don’t know why they would use a plastic gear in a situation such a belt sander. Hassle on warranties only turn people off from tools. All tools have a manufacturing date code on them and could be used to help establish the tools age.

    Ridgid has a lifetime warranty so it doesn’t matter how old it is, I think they bank on half of the people not doing the warranty exactly how they want it to be done so there is non warranty. Milwaukee is really good about their warranty. They know when it was made and sold so they always replace it as long as it’s in the 5 years.

    #574044

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I keep being told by my co-workers that I need a belt sander if I really want to make various sizes of wooden caulking slick fast and properly. I’ve never used one before but sure it would be helpful to have on hand.

    @utopia78,
    What about a small portable Drum Sander? this would free up both hands for more control of shaping your slicks.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #574047

    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    Make sure you remove the dust bag if you’re running metal on your belt sander. I quickly cleaned up a chisel one evening then came down the next morning to find a pile of ashes where my dust bag should be, had smoldered all night. Pretty scary

    #574053

    Wow that is scary, I don’t try to “dust collect” metal – but I am not certain I would have thought to for something as simple as cleaning up a chisel either.

    Will

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