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BATTERIES THE STRAIGHT DOPE!!

This topic contains 148 replies, has 32 voices, and was last updated by  Boschmanbrian 1 year, 1 month ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 149 total)
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  • #367382

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    It’s not confined to Dewalt. Have you noticed Milwaukee’s 12v lineup? That’s 10.8. If Dewalt had been the first company out there with the LiOn batteries then I bet everyone would be marketing them as 20v.

    Oddly the 12v stuff isn’t getting the reputation that Dewalt is getting for their 20v. Both utilize the MAX charge on the battery.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #367444

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Good video . I never saw the inside of the batteries before. Is it worthwhile to change the batteries inside the pack? Is it even possible?

    You would need cells with tabs on them or a capacitive discharge welder, don’t want to heat those cells with a soldering iron.

    But those individual cells aren’t really cheap so it may not be worthwhile.

    #367445

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    It’s not confined to Dewalt. Have you noticed Milwaukee’s 12v lineup? That’s 10.8. If Dewalt had been the first company out there with the LiOn batteries then I bet everyone would be marketing them as 20v.

    Oddly the 12v stuff isn’t getting the reputation that Dewalt is getting for their 20v. Both utilize the MAX charge on the battery.

    Probably because everybody now uses 12v in response. The Makita charger I have actually says 10.8 and 12v on it. But they trademarked 20v max so others can’t use it.

    #367449

    It’s not confined to Dewalt. Have you noticed Milwaukee’s 12v lineup? That’s 10.8. If Dewalt had been the first company out there with the LiOn batteries then I bet everyone would be marketing them as 20v.

    Oddly the 12v stuff isn’t getting the reputation that Dewalt is getting for their 20v. Both utilize the MAX charge on the battery.

    Probably because everybody now uses 12v in response. The Makita charger I have actually says 10.8 and 12v on it. But they trademarked 20v max so others can’t use it.

    I think you hit it. When Bosch started 12 V line , it was labeled 10.8. They had to go to 12 V to keep everything on a level playing field. As to 18 V, it has been an established way to go. Now Dewalt ups their numbers to make it sound better.

    #367451

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Yeah eh? Not only it’s 20v, it’s 20v MAX! 😀

    #367455

    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    So those old 36v tools, what were they actually?

    #367474

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Those are actually 36v, same as the new 36v lithium (or 40v MAX! in case of Dewalt), basically two 18v battery in series.

    #367478

    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    I didn’t know they were actually releasing new 36v tools. I thought brushless 18v had taken it’s place.

    #367480

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Dewalt is pushing their 40v outdoor power tools, I think they are relatively new. I’ve seen Bosch 36v drills online but they aren’t common.

    #367483

    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    I have seen a few different lines of 40v tools like lawnmowers and such. I know an a couple electricians that still use the old Milwaukee 36v and the old Bosch 36v. I don’t know how they compete with modern brushless tools. I’d be interested in seeing a head to head.

    #367494

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Okay , so I have the Ryobi lithium weed eater and the hedge trimmer plus the blower, so why do the promote the lawn mowers as 40 volt when they promote the yard tools I have as the 18 volt.

    #367496

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I didn’t know they were actually releasing new 36v tools. I thought brushless 18v had taken it’s place.

    I don’t think there is much of a market for what was formerly known as the 36v line from various companies…the way it’s done now is with two 18v batteries. Same voltage, but you can utilize the batteries you already have. As far as I know, all of Makita’s 36v tools are brushed…tons of power, but they will be even better when brushless versions are released.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #367512

    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    I remember seeing Makita’s 2 battery cordless saw. I never really understood why they didn’t put a brushless motor in it as well.

    #367552

    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Thanks for the article dirty, that’s why i like this site, brings the bs to light. So have the new 18v systems made the 12v systems obsolete? What is the main advantage to 18v over 12v, is it power or run time, or both?

    #367563

    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    I like my 12v system for its size and convenience. It’s not often I have to pull out my 18v drills any more.

    #367564

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Okay , so I have the Ryobi lithium weed eater and the hedge trimmer plus the blower, so why do the promote the lawn mowers as 40 volt when they promote the yard tools I have as the 18 volt.

    The Dewalt 40v ads I’ve seen seems aimed at professional users, I think most if not all are even brushless. They certainly aren’t priced for average homeowners.

    #367760

    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    Seriously, I can’t mad at Dewalt for this. The tools are competitive. If people get bogged down on one number then too bad. It’s things like torque, rpms and battery life that actually matter anyway. I’d rather have all 9v tools that performed like my 18v tools than have MORE voltage(i.e. weight).

    Look at the Makita brushed 18v circ saw vs. their brushless 18v circ saw. Two entirely different sets of stats, same damn battery.

    #367786

    Anonymous

    I remember seeing Makita’s 2 battery cordless saw. I never really understood why they didn’t put a brushless motor in it as well.

    Same here. I don’t see much point making any cordless aimed at tradesmen non-brushless, at this point.

    #367864

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Oddly the 12v stuff isn’t getting the reputation that Dewalt is getting for their 20v. Both utilize the MAX charge on the battery.

    Good point Jon. The nominal charge on the 12V is 10.8. So to be consistent a company that sells 12V tools should sell 20V tools?

    Yeah eh? Not only it’s 20v, it’s 20v MAX

    20V Max as in maximum charge

    It’s all marketing. The engineers design the tool, marketing figures out a way to sell it, we as consumers need to figure out how to buy it.

    Same here. I don’t see much point making any cordless aimed at tradesmen non-brushless, at this point.

    Right tradesman have a better tool budget and they are looking for performance and longevity.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #367869

    I remember seeing Makita’s 2 battery cordless saw. I never really understood why they didn’t put a brushless motor in it as well.

    That’s a really good point. I have that X2 saw and did a video on it I wish it was brushless but I have to admit, that saw is a POWERHOUSE. It will cut through almost anything. But I don’t know why a relatively new saw didn’t come with it. Maybe price point for the average consumer? Maybe the extended run time from the two batteries?

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