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Baseboard trim and bullnose corners.

This topic contains 30 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  MTRoads 5 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 31 total)
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  • #659769

    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Ran into an issue while installing baseboard trim over the new laminate flooring. I have a few bullnose corners to trim out and every corner has issues with the drywall ‘flaring out’ at the bottom just above the flooring.

    This leaves me with either a frustrating time trying to get the bevels/angles right to line things up with the baseboard flush against the wall (along the out of plumb wall). Or an unsightly gap on the top of the baseboard trim if I just cut the bevels/angles as if the wall were plumb.

    How do you guys deal with this, trial and error on the bevels/angles (or do you have a good way to calculate them), or just fill in the gap on the trim once competed?

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #659770

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I use the bench dog bullnose scriber and and for the flare out I use a grinder with a very coarse disk to get rid of the back of the trim.

    http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/fastening-tools/bench-dog-tools-bullnose-trim-gauge_o

    This house was very bad with the drywall too.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #659795

    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    Drywall flaring at the bottom of walls seems to be a common problem anymore – a little flare is manageable but I have run across some really bad ones recently. I like Dirty’s idea with the grinder…I usually stand the base against my table saw fence with the blade at an angle and rip off some of the backside to compensate for the drywall.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

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    Housewright Construction

    #659803

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I have never had to do baseboard like this,
    But thanks to you guys, I now can get it done easily from your tips and comments, nice information Dirty
    Thanks.
    Once again, another bonus from the pros at BTP.

    #659844

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I use the bench dog bullnose scriber and and for the flare out I use a grinder with a very coarse disk to get rid of the back of the trim.

    http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/fastening-tools/bench-dog-tools-bullnose-trim-gauge_o

    This house was very bad with the drywall too.

    All the corners in our house growing up looked like this, and I never knew how my dad did it (we built the whole thing ourselves – its where I got my start loving tools and experience with how to use them). Seems like a real good method you’ve got there Dirty. Some good looking miters.

    Charlie
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    #659857

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I have never had to trim around a bullnose before.

    The problem I keep running into is when I put laminate or tile floors down the base trim is a different height from the other floor. It happens mostly in the kitchen because there are no doors going to living room or dinning room. Sometimes I rip down the base in the kitchen to make them come out the same but I know there has to be a better way. Any suggestions?

    #659914

    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    I use the bench dog bullnose scriber and and for the flare out I use a grinder with a very coarse disk to get rid of the back of the trim.

    http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/fastening-tools/bench-dog-tools-bullnose-trim-gauge_o

    This house was very bad with the drywall too.

    Ok, I have the Bench Dog tool ordered. So from the looks of the bottom picture it appears you filled the gap in areas also.
    As for the grinder, are you talking about grinding away the lower back section of the baseboard trim so that the trim fits flush against the wall – yet is still perpendicular to the floor?

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #659928

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    On my 18v grinder I use the Basswood way of using 2 36 grit disc back to back. I don’t tack the scribe thing to the wall and hook my tape to it. I just use it to make the lines and measure to the lines. It seems like the bottom of the small corners need some grinding to fit.
    Now all my base board is installed with no corners on it yet. I take all my small scrapes and put a 22½º on one side and set a stop on the miter saw so I get a 7/8″ sp to sp and cut some. I move the stop a 1/16″ and cut some a bit smaller and then do that again so I have 3 or 4 different sizes all 1/16″ different. Now I go around with my kit of corners and see what one fits and glue and 23ga. pin it in place.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #659935

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Drywall flaring at the bottom of walls seems to be a common problem anymore – a little flare is manageable but I have run across some really bad ones recently. I like Dirty’s idea with the grinder…I usually stand the base against my table saw fence with the blade at an angle and rip off some of the backside to compensate for the drywall.

    Oh nice I like your table saw idea too!

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #660042

    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Thanks for the info above. Will be trying some grinding and TS trimming to see if I can get these pieces to fit properly (or close enough that some filler doesn’t look entirely out of place).

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #660087

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I’ve been kinda scratchin my head since I first read this thread as to how I might try to deal with the trim around the bullnose corners if I ever had to as I’m not crazy about the gaping left between the short corner piece placed over the bullnosed corner. If you’re just baseboarding with painted trim, I suppose you could insert some foam backer pieces in the gaping and just Alex caulk to deal with, but with a natural wood trim, you can’t really do that.

    Here was a thought, what about making your own plynth block of sorts with a 3/4 cove on its backside to fit neatly onto the bullnose corner? I’d think that having it with the grain running vertically and thick enough to accomodate 1/8th roundouver on its top and two sides along with some vertical fluting routed on its face might look quite nice.

    .

    Insofar as the flared out drywall bottoms, what about figuring out what the biggest delienation is from where the top of where the trim would be set against and adding a narrow filler strip behind the actual trim. So that the bottom of the trim doesn’t get booted in and broken as it would not be nailable and floating otherwise somewhat, either adding some gobs of No More Nails every foot or so, or maybe even running a line of low expansion foam along the bottom backside of the trim just prior to installing.

    What do you guys think?

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #660137

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i do something similar to what dirty does.. i dont use the grinder though i either carve the back of the base out with my knife or just flip the baseboard over so its face down and scallop the material out with the mitre saw.

    the bullnose corner beads arent very common anymore locally but i run into them on homes that were either built or renovated between 2000 and 2010. square bead is pretty much the norm again.

    ive never seen that little jig but its definitely an awesome idea.. typically in the past its been common to simply use some scrap pieces and make a preassembled corner… i will set the jig in place and mark where the short points contact the wall. from there simply measure to those marks

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #660220

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I’ve been kinda scratchin my head since I first read this thread as to how I might try to deal with the trim around the bullnose corners if I ever had to as I’m not crazy about the gaping left between the short corner piece placed over the bullnosed corner. If you’re just baseboarding with painted trim, I suppose you could insert some foam backer pieces in the gaping and just Alex caulk to deal with, but with a natural wood trim, you can’t really do that.

    Here was a thought, what about making your own plynth block of sorts with a 3/4 cove on its backside to fit neatly onto the bullnose corner? I’d think that having it with the grain running vertically and thick enough to accomodate 1/8th roundouver on its top and two sides along with some vertical fluting routed on its face might look quite nice.

    .

    Insofar as the flared out drywall bottoms, what about figuring out what the biggest delienation is from where the top of where the trim would be set against and adding a narrow filler strip behind the actual trim. So that the bottom of the trim doesn’t get booted in and broken as it would not be nailable and floating otherwise somewhat, either adding some gobs of No More Nails every foot or so, or maybe even running a line of low expansion foam along the bottom backside of the trim just prior to installing.

    What do you guys think?

    you can get premade inside and outside base blocks for bullnosencorners

    #660230

    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    This sounds like an existing situation, so I realize it’s probably not an option, but in my opinion these bead transitions are the way to go.
    Otherwise that jig looks like you’re on the right track to make things go quick as possible.

    #660234

    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    As far as the flaring at the bottom of wall, it sounds like mud buildup where the drywall knife first touches when running the bead, and those never really get sanded down at the floor. I always keep a 3″ stiff scraper handy when doing baseboard to knock blobs off that would kick the baseboard out of whack.

    #660332

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Another trick is that inside corners, we run a drywall screw into the bottom plate about an inch off of the floor and drive it flush with the face of the rock. It keeps the base from kicking back into the tapered edge of the drywall and prevents gaps when coping inside corners.

    #660350

    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    This sounds like an existing situation, so I realize it’s probably not an option, but in my opinion these bead transitions are the way to go.
    Otherwise that jig looks like you’re on the right track to make things go quick as possible.

    These are going on the short list for the next home construction. That would simplify things a lot, and look like a pretty ‘clean’ solution.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #660351

    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    The Bench Dog jig came in the mail today, so this coming weekend will involve some trail-and-error fitting to see how things go using that method.
    Thanks for all the ideas.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #660358

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I’ve been kinda scratchin my head since I first read this thread as to how I might try to deal with the trim around the bullnose corners if I ever had to as I’m not crazy about the gaping left between the short corner piece placed over the bullnosed corner. If you’re just baseboarding with painted trim, I suppose you could insert some foam backer pieces in the gaping and just Alex caulk to deal with, but with a natural wood trim, you can’t really do that.

    Here was a thought, what about making your own plynth block of sorts with a 3/4 cove on its backside to fit neatly onto the bullnose corner? I’d think that having it with the grain running vertically and thick enough to accomodate 1/8th roundouver on its top and two sides along with some vertical fluting routed on its face might look quite nice.

    .

    Insofar as the flared out drywall bottoms, what about figuring out what the biggest delienation is from where the top of where the trim would be set against and adding a narrow filler strip behind the actual trim. So that the bottom of the trim doesn’t get booted in and broken as it would not be nailable and floating otherwise somewhat, either adding some gobs of No More Nails every foot or so, or maybe even running a line of low expansion foam along the bottom backside of the trim just prior to installing.

    What do you guys think?

    you can get premade inside and outside base blocks for bullnosencorners

    That makes sense they would make pre-made stuff like that. Exactly the idea I had I was trying to explain to self make. I do also like that drywall flared out tapered corner that corners to a 90 as an option where you can just miter trim as normal with the base trim moulding.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #660405

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    This sounds like an existing situation, so I realize it’s probably not an option, but in my opinion these bead transitions are the way to go.
    Otherwise that jig looks like you’re on the right track to make things go quick as possible.

    Wow this a new one on me. That looks like a good Solution to say away from the little 22½º corners.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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