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baseboard backing

This topic contains 20 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  KeeganC 8 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 21 total)
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  • #662249

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Does anybody install a 1/2 x 2.5 rip of wood around the perimeter of the walls at the floor level?

    We see it with 3/4″ on old plaster work but it would be nice to have flat baseboard instead of tapered drywall to work with.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #662253

    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    If I understand what you’re saying correctly you would have to install this before the drywall and then cut your drywall when you install it?

    #662258

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I haven’t done it that way, but I have added an 1/8″ thick by 1″ wide strip near the floor height on top of the drywall to plumb the wall.

    I suppose the results are the same either way.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #662268

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I haven’t done it that way, but I have added an 1/8″ thick by 1″ wide strip near the floor height on top of the drywall to plumb the wall.

    I suppose the results are the same either way.

    Yeah I have done that too. Not the same

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #662272

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I haven’t done it that way, but I have added an 1/8″ thick by 1″ wide strip near the floor height on top of the drywall to plumb the wall.

    I suppose the results are the same either way.

    Yeah I have done that too. Not the same

    If I understand what you’re saying correctly you would have to install this before the drywall and then cut your drywall when you install it?

    Yes, on older homes with wood lath & plaster 1×4 was installed to allow ease of trim installation. Unless it was put there to prevent mortar blow out as you went up the wall.
    Its easier fastening through drywall in modern work and you dont have the mortar problem but with the taper ends you do have a hassle with plumbing baseboards.
    Again its not a big deal but would be nicer. Problem is plywood thickness is not quite the same.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #662278

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I haven’t done it that way, but I have added an 1/8″ thick by 1″ wide strip near the floor height on top of the drywall to plumb the wall.

    I suppose the results are the same either way.

    Yeah I have done that too. Not the same

    @topnotch, I guess I’m not following. How is it different? Wouldn’t a strip of wood of the appropriate thickness do the trick? (Top of the baseboard would be on the drywall while the bottom would sit on the wood strip.)

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #662282

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It sounds like a good idea.. I have never seen it before.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #662290

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I haven’t done it that way, but I have added an 1/8″ thick by 1″ wide strip near the floor height on top of the drywall to plumb the wall.

    I suppose the results are the same either way.

    Yeah I have done that too. Not the same

    @topnotch, I guess I’m not following. How is it different? Wouldn’t a strip of wood of the appropriate thickness do the trick? (Top of the baseboard would be on the drywall while the bottom would sit on the wood strip.)

    I just mean 1/8″ strip can still be wobbly on either the rock or where it lands on the recess in the back of the base.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #662293

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I just mean 1/8″ strip can still be wobbly on either the rock or where it lands on the recess in the back of the base.

    Potentially, yes. I suppose the 1/8” measurement was just an off the cuff guess. Regardless of the thickness, I would be making it at least an inch in height to properly support the trim.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #662304

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Does anybody install a 1/2 x 2.5 rip of wood around the perimeter of the walls at the floor level?

    Not a bad idea I guess if you hang the drywall horizontally.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #662311

    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    Does anybody install a 1/2 x 2.5 rip of wood around the perimeter of the walls at the floor level?

    Not a bad idea I guess if you hang the drywall horizontally.

    If you hung the drywall vertically, there would be no reason for the strip at all.

    #662332

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I like the idea. It makes so much sense. Plumb the wall and provide a solid nailing backer, too.

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #662349

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Does anybody install a 1/2 x 2.5 rip of wood around the perimeter of the walls at the floor level?

    Not a bad idea I guess if you hang the drywall horizontally.

    If you hung the drywall vertically, there would be no reason for the strip at all.

    Raises an interesting point. I wonder how many hang drywall vertically? I hang horizontally as that’s how I was taught, and it allows you to stagger the vertical joints. Curious if there is a right way (and why it’s the right way) or if it’s personal preference. That’s a clever idea about putting a backer board to make baseboard easier.

    #662364

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Raises an interesting point. I wonder how many hang drywall vertically? I hang horizontally as that’s how I was taught, and it allows you to stagger the vertical joints. Curious if there is a right way (and why it’s the right way) or if it’s personal preference.

    There’s an article I found on FHB that discusses this.

    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2017/03/28/horizontal-vs-vertical-drywall

    There’s advantages and disadvantages depending on which trade is dealing with it.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #662377

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I tend to think you need to double the framing member on vertical locations in order to get proper nailing.

    I know thats rare but I dont like just grabbing the edge on long repetitive runs. In fact I estimate my basement making these framing considerations.

    On but joints this usually little space to grab the stud. I nail these places. I feel like screws break away too much material.

    Also railroading is superior when tying in wall section camouflaging i and out crowns that would stand out more with vertical applications. Vertical applications get more credit as shear walls than horizontal. Unless you solid block all seems.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #662379

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    There’s an article I found on FHB that discusses this.

    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2017/03/28/horizontal-vs-vertical-drywall

    There’s advantages and disadvantages depending on which trade is dealing with it.

    Thanks for posting that. I can see the benefits of either way I guess. Definitely not cut and dried which way to do it.

    #662394

    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    One trick I have used when installing baseboard, is to drive a roofing nail into the bottom of the drywall in the corners, leaving it sticking out slightly. Helps hold the bottom of the trim vertical, when you put the coped piece against it, if needed you simply tap the bottom in a little to make a perfect fit.

    #662440

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    One trick I have used when installing baseboard, is to drive a roofing nail into the bottom of the drywall in the corners, leaving it sticking out slightly. Helps hold the bottom of the trim vertical, when you put the coped piece against it, if needed you simply tap the bottom in a little to make a perfect fit.

    This is a great trick. I use a screw and a mini level.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #662453

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    One trick I have used when installing baseboard, is to drive a roofing nail into the bottom of the drywall in the corners, leaving it sticking out slightly. Helps hold the bottom of the trim vertical, when you put the coped piece against it, if needed you simply tap the bottom in a little to make a perfect fit.

    Thanks Brian. I like this. Will try to remember it next I do a little trim.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #662493

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I use the roofing nail too and it works but it’s stupid that it comes to that. That was the point of the thread.

    Backing improves the outcome.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

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