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Bar top

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  • #417356

    I finally got back to the home theater i worked on at the beginning of August to build a bar in the back of the room. The homeowner was originally thinking of granite for the bar top but is now wanting to do a solid wood top. Im not really to worried about building the top but i am not sure of what to use to finish it. I was thinking epoxy of some type, but overall i have now clue. Has anyone on here built a bar top, if so what did you use to finish it.

    #417364
    yellaD
    Pro

    Good thread, I’ve never done it neither and would like to know from someone with experience. Epoxy of some sort wold make sense for a bar top, possibly a marine grade?

    #417375

    I was really looking at the West System, as i have used it previously and it was a great product. I know beer is very caustic, and most breweries epoxy coat their floors, i really think epoxy is the way to go.

    #417378
    yellaD
    Pro

    I use the West System as well, I wonder how much you’d need for your top and how if you need to mix/dilute/add it with anything? The WS is not the cheapest solution in the world…

    #417443

    Yeah not really that cheap, nice thing is my customers is willing to pay the price if you can tell him it’s a quality long lasting product. I just wanted to see if anyone had some other ideas, maybe some custom mixes that would give you a durable finish.

    #417449
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    it’ll probably be epoxy as none of the other finishes will be able to handle wet cups and stuff. Unless it is a butcher block top and at that point you would used a salad bowl finish.

    #417465
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    What about a wood grain laminate on the top? That would look like wood but be very durable.

    #417494

    Im partial to wood bars being wood-like

    Id go with a penetrating oil product like waterlox rather than an epoxy/film. The nice thing about the penetrating products is you can spot sand and tough up if needed. Looks fairly natural too

    Now, if you go for a slab or something, and the homeowner doesnt mind a bit of work, wax only is a great option. They just have to touch it up about once a year

    #417545
    yellaD
    Pro

    Smart, what brad and kind of wax do you recommend? I like this idea because it ensures a very flat and even finished surface. With epoxy, I was thinking there would be a lot of sanding afterwards if the finish isn’t applied nicely so you wouldn’t be saving time there. Price for wax vs epoxy is prolly a difference too.

    #417546

    Smart, what brad and kind of wax do you recommend? I like this idea because it ensures a very flat and even finished surface. With epoxy, I was thinking there would be a lot of sanding afterwards if the finish isn’t applied nicely so you wouldn’t be saving time there. Price for wax vs epoxy is prolly a difference too.

    Minwax does a decent job, but I prefer to keep it food safe too if people might eat off it. Nice to know you can cut garnishes on the bartop

    Melt some beeswax (white) in some mineral oil (heavy stuff from pharmacy laxative section) in a ratio of about one-part wax to 6-parts heated oil. When it gels to a vaseline-like texture, wipe on, let sit, wipe off.. And you can get beeswax on amazon in small easily melted beads for real cheap. Give the owners a mason jar of it and the recipe for more,…

    Its what I use for cutting boards too and butcher block counter too

    Other ideas are
    http://askhlm.com/Home/HLMRedirect.aspx/Articles/ArticleViewPage/tabid/75/ArticleId/18/Workbench-Finish.aspx

    #417549

    If you like the wax idea, I would apply an oil finish first to pop the grain and then wax with a good furniture paste wax. I have been using Watco Danish Oil and really like it. It even comes in various tints if you want to color the wood some. It is so easy to repair and gives the wood a natural feel versus the “plastic” finish of epoxy or urethane.

    #417550

    If you like the wax idea, I would apply an oil finish first to pop the grain and then wax with a good furniture paste wax. I have been using Watco Danish Oil and really like it. It even comes in various tints if you want to color the wood some. It is so easy to repair and gives the wood a natural feel versus the “plastic” finish of epoxy or urethane.

    That is gorgeous, but since danish oil has some poly in it, it does leave a slight film. Not a big deal, but you lose some repairability compared to no film (still easy repair) and its not food safe

    BLO or turpentine will get a similar look, and be perfectly safe once cured. Check out the link in my last post for a good mix. I had it saved as its whats going on my workbench

    #417559
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The BLO/ turpentine mixture is what I have used to restore the lustre of old varnish and paint finishes on antique furniture. The thinned BLO soaks into the finish and “feeds” it; replacing the lost oils in the finish without damaging the patina. This mixture will also remove gently the accumulated dirt built up over the years.

    As a new finish the BLO/turpentine/wax will be very simple to maintain as often as required and will enhance the colour and grain of the wood. Perfect for a bar top.

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    #417572

    Sweet job to get to do Tyler! Will it have a drink shelf and armrest built in?

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #417582
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    If you use West System, make sure to use the right hardner. They make on that is UV resistant.

    #417593
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    You didn’t say what type of wood top but if it’s just plywood I’d cover it with a laminate, There’s plenty of color/texture options out there and it’d be maintenance free forever in a home bar. Post up some pics when ya can, Sounds like a fun project

    EDIT; Oooops, I see you did say solid wood top. If that means a 2″-3″ slab I wouldn’t cover that up with laminate 🙂

    #417606

    Judging from the high caliber work Tyler did in the theater area I seriously doubt his client would accept a laminate top.

    I hope you show us your process if you do the epoxy coating. Interested in seeing that.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #417617
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    A laminate top would be much easier to maintain and hold up better. It could have a wood edge and look just the same as wood. There are some very nice wood laminates out there .

    #417671
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    speaking of laminate countertops with a wood finish.. ikea actually has some really nice ones.. weve been installing them on some of the custom benches weve been installing on jobs lately

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #417703

    Judging from the high caliber work Tyler did in the theater area I seriously doubt his client would accept a laminate top.

    I hope you show us your process if you do the epoxy coating. Interested in seeing that.

    Thanks. There’s no way my customer would let me put in a laminate top. Not to say there is anything wrong with laminate just wouldn’t fit the application. I will definitely be posting about the construction and finishing of the top.

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