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Are the Bosch vacs worth the cost?

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 143 total)
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  • #619454
    CB
    Spectator

    The cheaper shop vacs recirculate a lot of dust and blow dust into the air.

    Many years ago, I bought 7 or 8 extra 2.5″ generic shop vac hoses from Grainger. I got them there because they had swivel ends, and were a little longer than stock Sears issue.

    I’ve always run hoses on BOTH ends of the shop vac, the inlet AND the outlet. I pipe the outlet air outside, or away from my work area, so the exhaust air doesn’t kick up any settled dust, and because I always wondered if any dirty air just traveled all the way through the vac.

    There is one exception to the piping vacuum exhaust air outside…

    In my shop, when I set up my 1983 radial saw, I permanently parked a shop vac underneath (another Sears model), and Y piped the suction end to the blade guard and a duct I shrouded the back of the radial saw with. And I routed the exhaust port with a hose attached to a wide floor nozzle, and mounted the floor nozzle to the front of the radial saw table, in order to “sweep” the dust into the vacuum inlet shroud at the rear of the radial saw table. ZERO dust anywhere. It was like an air cleaning vortex.

    #619475
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I’ve always run hoses on BOTH ends of the shop vac, the inlet AND the outlet. I pipe the outlet air outside, or away from my work area, so the exhaust air doesn’t kick up any settled dust,

    CB that is a great idea. Never thought of running a hose on the exhaust as well.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #619481

    My take is that the CFM ratings on most vacs are inflated, since they are the cfm of the fan outside of the casing, with no vacuum attached at all.

    From head to head testing, there is no comparison – the premium extractors just work better, at a more pleasant noise level.

    The static pressure numbers are the only ones that are probably accurate, and the Bosch/Festool/Fein all get more than triple the static pressure of the Ridgid

    All this said, I have a ridgid with the “Hepa” filter, drywall bags, and a dust deputy. Nothing is getting out, and it sucks up most of the dust. Im really debating whether the better ones give me value for my money, but there is no doubt that they are far superior, and worth it to someone who is mobile and using it all day every day.

    For me in a shop, my big dust collector does most of the heavy lifting, with the Ridgid shop vac mostly on sanding and circular saw duty.

    #619535
    CB
    Spectator

    I’ve always run hoses on BOTH ends of the shop vac, the inlet AND the outlet. I pipe the outlet air outside, or away from my work area, so the exhaust air doesn’t kick up any settled dust,

    CB that is a great idea. Never thought of running a hose on the exhaust as well.

    Here’s a photo attached. I wish I knew how to put the photos in the post, rather than as attachments. I can do that successfully in another forum that uses “ubb code”, but this forum uses a different kind of forum code, where I can’t even figure out how to use bold or italics, and thus have to SHOUT for emphasis. Just a learning curve, I guess.

    Back to vacuums… two hoses are better than one…

    Attachments:
    #619539
    CB
    Spectator

    And while I’m in the photo posting mode, yesterday I brought the camera to show how I’ve been “recycling” my shop vac filters. This particular filter is one of the nicer ones, as the filter media is green (signifying some type of special paper fabric) and the pleats are encapsulated with sturdy rubber full coverage caps at the top and bottom ends.

    Some of my other less fancier Sears filters have unsupported exposed fan fold pleats on the end, including the filter that I installed yesterday to temporarily replace the nice filter while it dries out for a couple of days after cleaning it.

    The nice filter is shown in the dirty state, just as I opened the vacuum cleaner to retrieve it, and then shown in the cleaned state, after rinsing the filter with water. I want to emphasize at this point that the filter in both photos below is the EXACT SAME filter. Not just the same type of filter, but the very same specimen, shot before and after rinsing.

    Using this procedure, I’ve extended the life of these filters for going on decades now. I have had to throw a couple away, but that was due to the rubber surround failing from me leaving the filters out in the sun too long (forgot about them in the back yard).

    I’m still considering getting one of these new fangled dust collection deals… but part of that consideration should include a disclosure of how I’ve gotten by all these years, to better help you help me understand the differences in both operation and ongoing cost comparisons.

    #619546
    CB
    Spectator

    As far as a $650 vacuum lasting longer than a $99 vacuum, attached is a face shot of my $99 special, purchased at Sears at some sale they had in 1987. Thirty years ago, $99 was a lot more money than it is today, and I could have purchased a shop vac with equivalent power for $59, but I was particularly enamored with the auto retracting cord that self coils up into the head, as well as the infinitely variable speed switch in the front, that actually controlled the motor itself (not just venting a leak in the vacuum stream).

    Variable speed, retractable cord, and 30 years of service and no sign of failure yet… any replacement vac has some pretty big shoes to fill. 😉

    (Second photo below is of putting water in the tub to prevent dust from flying in the air when cleaning the tub).

    #619556
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    @cb well with the new fangled dust collectors, you won’t get those washable filters. I love using those for the ridgid and they work great. The new ones work well and work with new filters and you will have to replace them when the time comes. i use the air hose to clean my bosch ones up.

    #619634
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    I’ve thought about a the Bosch vacs before but never really looked into them based on the prices, but after reading through this whole thread I just might have to think twice.

    Yes definitely a worth while investment especially if you ate always working in a space that the client is still living in and for your health as well. I will be writing a review on the Bosch extractor in the next week or so

    I’ve thought about it over and over again for renos, but with the majority of my work being framing it’s hard for me to justify the price.

    The second my wife gives me the green light on tearing down the two sheds and building a shop, there will definitely be one in the mail.

    #619911
    CB
    Spectator

    i use the air hose to clean my bosch ones up.

    How do you keep from breathing all the micro fine dust that comes off the filter in a cloud from the compressed air blast that unsettled it? Do you wear a respirator or something like that?

    #619914
    Doobie
    Moderator

    i use the air hose to clean my bosch ones up.

    How do you keep from breathing all the micro fine dust that comes off the filter in a cloud from the compressed air blast that unsettled it? Do you wear a respirator or something like that?

    I agree. But when I’ve had to do dust out a filter or whatnot, I do it outside paying attention to wind direction. Somewhat a PITA.

    No nobody should suck in the dust from removing its elements from what is an extractor or a ‘Plain Jane’ shopvac. You try to do it in a manner that minimizes such. This is why I love vac bags that self contain all that crap and is the best course. Bag is filled, pull it out and replace with a new one.

    People need to stop looking at the cost of self-contained bags versus dump out configurations or even DD type additions. If the DD was a more compact thing, which I doubt it ever will be, I doubt if you gave me one I’d ever use it. You still have the airborne potential nastiness of dumping it out which in some cases is really not desirable for a variety of reasons.

    Took me a while to see the merits, but after a while of the BS of trying to work around it, payin for the bags has become a privileged. Sometimes, being too frugal has its deficiencies never mind the fact that when you buy a high quality vac you should have the dough to use it as intended with its consumables as needed.

    #619927
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    This is why I love vac bags that self contain all that crap and is the best course. Bag is filled, pull it out and replace with a new one.

    You are right dust bags are the way to go here.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #619928
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    i use the air hose to clean my bosch ones up.

    How do you keep from breathing all the micro fine dust that comes off the filter in a cloud from the compressed air blast that unsettled it? Do you wear a respirator or something like that?

    Yah i wear a respirator for sure. I also dump mine in a bag outside. it works.

    #619946

    i use the air hose to clean my bosch ones up.

    How do you keep from breathing all the micro fine dust that comes off the filter in a cloud from the compressed air blast that unsettled it? Do you wear a respirator or something like that?

    Yah i wear a respirator for sure. I also dump mine in a bag outside. it works.

    Although Im only on a Ridgid vac, my approach is still the one I would keep on a better vac.

    I use a bag in the vac, and keep dust deputy in front of it, most of the time. If Im sucking up anything sketchy, I remove the dust deputy from the process, and let the bag take it, then toss the bag when full.

    For everything else, I just dump the dust deputy out outside, and dont worry too much about the puff of sawdust – it usually doesn’t get breathed in anyways.

    If all the dust is real fine, as from sanding, I may wet down the inside of the DD before opening it and just pour it out instead, but its pretty rare.

    #619989
    CB
    Spectator

    Wood sawdust debris, and even drywall dust debris, along with the paper encapsulating the drywall, are all good for the ground. I used to break up old drywall and rototill it in my compost yard, along with wood chips, saw dust, coffee grounds, leaves, and the neighbors lawn clippings.

    Among that list of soil amendments above, the worse stuff for my compost was the neighbor’s lawn clippings. Between the poisons one neighbor sprayed on the lawn, to the crab grass that another neighbor ended up giving my garden (the only time I ever caught the crabs)… I began to suggest my neighbors go ahead and recycle their lawn clippings, once the garbage service began offering green recycling (they didn’t before).

    Sorry for the tangent… the topic is construction vacuums… and what to do with the debris. Is it safe to return to earth? Yes of course… and the soil benefits from gypsum and wood pulp. Now, lead paint and asbestos is another matter altogether. But the majority of the job site dust I create is from sawing and sanding. No problem with adding water and returning it to earth.

    #619996

    Wood sawdust debris, and even drywall dust debris, along with the paper encapsulating the drywall, are all good for the ground. I used to break up old drywall and rototill it in my compost yard, along with wood chips, saw dust, coffee grounds, leaves, and the neighbors lawn clippings.

    Among that list of soil amendments above, the worse stuff for my compost was the neighbor’s lawn clippings. Between the poisons one neighbor sprayed on the lawn, to the crab grass that another neighbor ended up giving my garden (the only time I ever caught the crabs)… I began to suggest my neighbors go ahead and recycle their lawn clippings, once the garbage service began offering green recycling (they didn’t before).

    Sorry for the tangent… the topic is construction vacuums… and what to do with the debris. Is it safe to return to earth? Yes of course… and the soil benefits from gypsum and wood pulp. Now, lead paint and asbestos is another matter altogether. But the majority of the job site dust I create is from sawing and sanding. No problem with adding water and returning it to earth.

    Mine goes into the compost bin to go to the city, as I mostly work with walnut, which is a mild herbacide. Along with pine, the sawdust will eventually make the ground barren. It will eventually decompose, and so works well in a compost pit, but I wouldnt use the soil it produces any time soon if I want things to grow.

    #620004

    This is why I love vac bags that self contain all that crap and is the best course. Bag is filled, pull it out and replace with a new one.

    You are right dust bags are the way to go here.

    Yes, that’s what I do to, even though I just use a chitty shop vac, lol easily change the bags and filters also. If I do need to shake out a filter or something similar, I usually encapsulate it in a bigger garbage bag and shake it, and let the dust settle before I removed it, or do the slides over and close the bottom end of the bag that holds the dust and try to do it outside also.

    #620019
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    Wood sawdust debris, and even drywall dust debris, along with the paper encapsulating the drywall, are all good for the ground. I used to break up old drywall and rototill it in my compost yard, along with wood chips, saw dust, coffee grounds, leaves, and the neighbors lawn clippings.

    Among that list of soil amendments above, the worse stuff for my compost was the neighbor’s lawn clippings. Between the poisons one neighbor sprayed on the lawn, to the crab grass that another neighbor ended up giving my garden (the only time I ever caught the crabs)… I began to suggest my neighbors go ahead and recycle their lawn clippings, once the garbage service began offering green recycling (they didn’t before).

    Sorry for the tangent… the topic is construction vacuums… and what to do with the debris. Is it safe to return to earth? Yes of course… and the soil benefits from gypsum and wood pulp. Now, lead paint and asbestos is another matter altogether. But the majority of the job site dust I create is from sawing and sanding. No problem with adding water and returning it to earth.

    if the drywall is the newer light weight drywall then no.. it has fibreglass strands mixed in with it to help give it strength.. you can see the fibres when you cut it as it will look like little hairs

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #620068
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I began to suggest my neighbors go ahead and recycle their lawn clippings, once the garbage service began offering green recycling (they didn’t before).

    In my municipality they specifically say they do not want lawn clippings in yard waste collection. Officially I never asked why, but I suspect it is because they are a fire hazard when clumped up and damp.

    #620126
    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    Right on @doobie how much is paper bags you can get 5 for low as 10 amazon 15 bucks for 5 so 3 dollar each I don’t care what you sacking up its worth it i used more then 30 paper bags on my vac also used without bags on concrete dust. It’s not worth 3 dollar to get all that dirty stuff airborne again just to save 3$ also mess it makes inside the canister. So I think it’s well worth it @cb I have 3 dead shop vacs but this dust extractor I used ever week atleast 5 hour almost for 3 years. so your vacuum that sits in the garage isn’t gonna compare with this type of dust extractor. We can talk allday about your extractor modify it etc etc they already made one that does what it supposed to do. Simple as that

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #620150
    CB
    Spectator

    Yes, they’ve already made dust extractors. That was already established prior to the original poster’s observations. I guess his point, and now my point, is where to strike a balance between both near term and long term costs to get the job done… and with that, is the job getting done commensurately better?

    Where does one draw the line? The single phase, 120 volt, portable/wheel mounted, S26 HEPA dust extractor at my local White Cap (now HD Supply, and this branch specializes in concrete work) is around $2,699.00. Have a look at the link immediately below:

    https://www.whitecap.com/shop/wc/p/s26-hepa-dust-extractor-vacuum-120v-erma-pullman-200900059a

    Sporting 258 CFM, and 100″ of water lift, operating on single phase current with the ability to switch between 120v or 230v operation, what’s not to like? Is THAT worth the price? If not, then why not?

    For those who feel that the Bosch is good enough, gets the job done, and paying 5 times more for the Ermator Pullman just isn’t worth the price premium… please dwell on that thought for a moment longer. If you are completely satisfied with your VAC140a, or VAC090a, what would motivate you to put out another $2,700.00 for something that, as far as you can see, can be accomplished with what you already have.

    Still dwelling on this thought? I hope so, because if you are, you are now once again wearing the same shoes that the original poster and I are wearing.

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