dcsimg

anyone using routers to level rough slabs?

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)
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  • #367345
    svensshutters
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    I think a Jig would be easy to make. Or, if you have a nice wooden bench that you are doing this on, you could always inset a couple of t-tracks parallel and use blocks in the tracks with knobs that you could butt up against both sides. Kind of like what the Keter Tables have?

    #367593
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    That’s a good idea, i think i’ll build a small version to try things out leveling a couple rounds i have cut from logs, maybe 2″ thick, to see how it works on end grain

    #367598

    Was thinking the same thing @svensshutters – Ideally, you want your clamps incorporated into your jig and the method you describe was what I was thinking. You need to stabilize the workpiece, and clamping from the sides, similar to the bench dog method on a workbench, would be perfect.

    I think a Jig would be easy to make. Or, if you have a nice wooden bench that you are doing this on, you could always inset a couple of t-tracks parallel and use blocks in the tracks with knobs that you could butt up against both sides. Kind of like what the Keter Tables have?

    #367781
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    I built a sled for my old router today and tried it out on a cedar round i had, might cut out some more of the center and make either a picture frame out of it or a mirror. I didn’t spend much time on the rails, more just wanted to try out the concept. It actually worked quite well, left some ridges but could be easily sanded out. A bigger cutter would help, 3/4″ was the biggest i could find with 1/4″ shank, looking forward to the new router! I cut both directions, push and pull, but i think it may have worked better just cutting one way, i’ll work on that next time. It did a good job of leveling, as the piece was at least a half inch thicker on one end. All in all, a successful first attempt!

    #367840
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    @gomoto69 – That’s essentially the same idea as what I went with for the sled, except instead of a separate rail piece with the work on it, I put some short ‘legs’ on the bottom of the sled to stabilize it over the work. In other words, it’s one piece. Side and end guides/stops are the same material as the sled base – only about an inch thick.
    If I had the work on a piece of scrap ply and clamped it down to the bench, I could nail or even hot glue the work to the ply. Hot glue would make it easier when both sides are uneven to start with.
    The advantage of the movable 2x6s in the Wood Whisperer’s video is that he can adjust the height of the router over the work. I need to figure out how I can move from from doing a 3/4 inch thick piece to a 3″ piece or whatever without having a bunch of shims made up.
    I like the T track idea – maybe long bolts wih nuts/washers below to set the height and nuts above to lock it, but T track limits the angular movement. It would be harder to move the sled as you advance.
    For the fence on my router table, I just cut through slots in the table. A bolt runs through a block of 1×4 under the table, up through the table, and up through the fence, topped off with a wingnut. It gives me enough slop to easily set the fence at a broad varity of angles, but locks tightly. Maybe do it like a table on the bench…
    More ideas to play with.
    Looks like it works!

    #367976
    svensshutters
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    Wow, that’s a big difference, it does a really nice job. I thinkt that I could have used that tip for a friend of mine a while back, I’m glad that this thread came to be on the site. And while I don’t have a use for a sled like that right now, it’s a great addition for my tool bag of knowledge.

    #368141
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    I didn’t spend much time at all on those rails, and like you say, needs to be adjustable for height of workpiece. My router doesn’t have much depth adjustment, was maxed out and still had to get rails within about 1/4″ of high point of work piece to work. Having the height built onto the sled is a good idea, have to put some thought into that! Bigger router and bigger cutter will make doing coffee table size pieces more feasible, was pretty slow!

    #368152
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    Thanks for the idea, been thinking about it for a while..

    #368186

    The slab came out well. This method works pretty well – slow, but you can get great results from it.

    Orange County, CA

    #368600
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    It did make a big difference svensshutters, it’s hard to tell in that little photo, but it was catting at least 3/8″ at that point and over 1/2″ by time i got to the top, but cedar cuts so easily it didn’t bog down at all.

    #368684
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Wow that looks like it worked really well. I guess compared to a jointer the router method is slow but the router will do pieces that the jointer can’t like what you have there. I’ve thought about using the router on big boards that won’t fit through the jointer but so far haven’t had the need to.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #595279
    stevem
    Pro
    Sarnia, ON

    interesting read, a client of mine has a large slice rather than slab from a tree that was cut 5 years ago. its end grain rather than long grain

    she want s a coffee tabletop made!! its ranges from 4 inches to 7 inches thick, so i need to flatten the top side and get a reasonable thickness. its around 4 feet in diameter.

    i need to remove about 3/4 inch off the top side to get rid off chainsaw booboos

    #595300

    interesting read, a client of mine has a large slice rather than slab from a tree that was cut 5 years ago. its end grain rather than long grain

    she want s a coffee tabletop made!! its ranges from 4 inches to 7 inches thick, so i need to flatten the top side and get a reasonable thickness. its around 4 feet in diameter.

    i need to remove about 3/4 inch off the top side to get rid off chainsaw booboos

    I did something like that with a sander with aggressive removal mode. The 1250DEVS. Big slice of very dry maple

    The router on rails (router plane) will work. Infinity makes a router bit for planing.. @58chev did so with a Yonico bit.

    Im not a fan of using a router on that much end grain. Either way, sander or router, 3/4 is a lot of end grain to remove.

    #595326
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    interesting read, a client of mine has a large slice rather than slab from a tree that was cut 5 years ago. its end grain rather than long grain

    she want s a coffee tabletop made!! its ranges from 4 inches to 7 inches thick, so i need to flatten the top side and get a reasonable thickness. its around 4 feet in diameter.

    i need to remove about 3/4 inch off the top side to get rid off chainsaw booboos



    @stevem
    ,
    You might want to use an electric Planer/Jointer to get the thick of it off then use a router in a jig to skim the top. Then take a sander to finish it off.

    I just recently did my workbench top that is 22″W x 60″L grain is in a variety of directions. Most in one area to to take off was about 1/4″ and the Bosch MR23 router with the Yonico 1-1/2″ bottoming bit sliced through it like a hot knife through butter.
    Some progress pic’s are here: http://bethepro.com/forums/topic/what-is-essential-in-a-good-woodworking-bench-v2-1/page/9/

    Example of an electric planer/jointer. 😉

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #595567
    stevem
    Pro
    Sarnia, ON

    the power planer would be a good start, need some blades for my freud!
    i was also considering a sled guided skill saw for the really rough stuff, be nice to have a thicker blade or even mount two blades but i dont think the arbour is long enough

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)
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