dcsimg

anyone using routers to level rough slabs?

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 55 total)
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  • #363819
    staker
    Pro

    There is a good one on this video.

    #363821
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Probably easier to use a table saw if your goal is to glue them together. I did it to make those triangle stair tread and the result is good.

    #363872
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Fairly simple build for this one.

    Interesting way of doing that. A lot easier than reaching over all the time. Still, takes forever obviously.

    #363915
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    You’d be better off using a router table and shimming the outfeed side of your fence.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/BwNmdVzw1Kg?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    what do you guys think of this method for jointing edges?

    I’ll have to get a router table then, lol that’ll have to wait in line till after the festool lol.

    #363938
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’ll have to get a router table then, lol that’ll have to wait in line till after the festool lol.

    Do you have a router?

    #363946
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I’ll have to get a router table then, lol that’ll have to wait in line till after the festool lol.

    Do you have a router?

    Yes I do have a porter cable 890 with the plunge attachment. Great piece but hasn’t seen much use as its one tool I’m not 100per cent familiar with. I’ll hopefully end up playing more with it later.

    #363989

    Here you go @r-ice. Doesn’t cut into your Festool savings 😉

    #364096
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    You can also make one that drops into the extension wing of your table saw and use the table saw fence. I keep meaning to do one but never got around to, would’ve come in really handy.

    #364100

    I think that a router sled works fine for leveling large slabs. It is slow. I am going to be trying to use a portable hand plane to see how that works based on the videos I have seen on You Tube. I think these were posted before, but if not – here they are – is a faster technique than a router. Also, for jointing a track saw would work very well. You can but the edges up to one another and run the saw between the two pieces and get a perfectly mated pair.

    Orange County, CA

    #364140
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Here you go @r-ice. Doesn’t cut into your Festool savings 😉

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/AnhKtUKCnFo?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    hmm this looks intriguing, I may have to give this a go later.

    #364144

    Great option also. You can remove the fence and use the entire table length to rout large work also. You’d need to make a sacrificial fence for your existing table saw fence in order to accommodate the cutter clearance needed.

    You can also make one that drops into the extension wing of your table saw and use the table saw fence. I keep meaning to do one but never got around to, would’ve come in really handy.

    #364176
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    I built a router sled today but it’s too hot to test it out. Will do that in middle of night with the AC running.

    I’ve got a bunch of oak, elm, pecan, and bois d’arc boards I cut on the bandsaw from logs found by the street.

    Some of the bigger stuff gave me problems sawing it up and there are bumps and wobbles on both sides. They aren’t the big slabs shown in the videos, but I need a flat reference surface for the planer. The sled should give one side flat enough. My other possibility was a planer sled in which you shim up the bottom, anchor it, plane it flat, then flip, flatten that, then take it down to thickness. Since I’m new to planers, I’ll try that later after I get used to more basic operations.

    I used laminated ply for the body since it’s slick and easy for the router to run on. The rest is pretty much like the vid shows.

    #364180

    Would love to see a video of the one you built in action. If you to get around to using it later, try to get some video to post.

    Are you able to post a few pics of what you built?

    I built a router sled today but it’s too hot to test it out. Will do that in middle of night with the AC running.

    I’ve got a bunch of oak, elm, pecan, and bois d’arc boards I cut on the bandsaw from logs found by the street.

    Some of the bigger stuff gave me problems sawing it up and there are bumps and wobbles on both sides. They aren’t the big slabs shown in the videos, but I need a flat reference surface for the planer. The sled should give one side flat enough. My other possibility was a planer sled in which you shim up the bottom, anchor it, plane it flat, then flip, flatten that, then take it down to thickness. Since I’m new to planers, I’ll try that later after I get used to more basic operations.

    I used laminated ply for the body since it’s slick and easy for the router to run on. The rest is pretty much like the vid shows.

    #364205
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    <P>Would love to see a video of the one you built in action. If you to get around to using it later, try to get some video to post.</P>
    <P>Are you able to post a few pics of what you built?</P>

    <P>I built a router sled today but it’s too hot to test it out. Will do that in middle of night with the AC running.</P>
    <P>I’ve got a bunch of oak, elm, pecan, and bois d’arc boards I cut on the bandsaw from logs found by the street.</P>
    <P>Some of the bigger stuff gave me problems sawing it up and there are bumps and wobbles on both sides. They aren’t the big slabs shown in the videos, but I need a flat reference surface for the planer. The sled should give one side flat enough. My other possibility was a planer sled in which you shim up the bottom, anchor it, plane it flat, then flip, flatten that, then take it down to thickness. Since I’m new to planers, I’ll try that later after I get used to more basic operations.</P>
    <P>I used laminated ply for the body since it’s slick and easy for the router to run on. The rest is pretty much like the vid shows.</P>

    🙂
    It’s a piece of about 8″ plywood that’s laminated on both sides and a 2 inch slot cut up the middle. It’s a scrap from a cabinet shop. It has a 4 inch piece of ply on each end for risers, glued and finish nailed. I made the end stops from the strip I cut out of the middle.
    Not much to look at, but I’ll get it in the pics when I test it.

    #364565
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Lots of good ideas, thank you. Has been really hot here too, really sucks the energy out of a person! I have one very rough fir slab about a foot wide that someone hand cut with a chainsaw, i’ll try to set something up for that for a practice run. Far too dry in the bush to take out my chainsaw mill, laws in bc now hold you responsible for costs if you start a fire!

    #364716

    So how did the test go with the new sled @Toolshead? Did it work as you had expected?

    :)
    It’s a piece of about 8″ plywood that’s laminated on both sides and a 2 inch slot cut up the middle. It’s a scrap from a cabinet shop. It has a 4 inch piece of ply on each end for risers, glued and finish nailed. I made the end stops from the strip I cut out of the middle.
    Not much to look at, but I’ll get it in the pics when I test it.

    #367006
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    So how did the test go with the new sled @Toolshead? Did it work as you had expected?

    Sled worked as expected during a short test.
    Used a 1/4″ router with a 3/4″ straight bit to take some cupping out of a scrap of 2×6. A bigger router and bit would work much better, but it was enough to see if it worked.
    Was on the workbench, so I used to double backed tape to anchor the board instead of screwing it down. It worked well until I got to a knot and the tape couldn’t hold it.
    Proof of concept is good. Need to screw it down to hold it, really.
    I don’t think I’d try to use it for fine work, but it does well in getting it flat enough to run through the planer a little a time.
    Watch both the posted videos and come up with a hybrid.

    #367008

    Make a jig so that you can place the workpiece inside, and clamp it down that way. Then, the sled can ride on top of the jig.

    Good to hear that your preliminary test proved that the concept worked. Hope the workpiece didn’t do any damage when it let go!!

    So how did the test go with the new sled @Toolshead? Did it work as you had expected?

    Sled worked as expected during a short test.
    Used a 1/4″ router with a 3/4″ straight bit to take some cupping out of a scrap of 2×6. A bigger router and bit would work much better, but it was enough to see if it worked.
    Was on the workbench, so I used to double backed tape to anchor the board instead of screwing it down. It worked well until I got to a knot and the tape couldn’t hold it.
    Proof of concept is good. Need to screw it down to hold it, really.
    I don’t think I’d try to use it for fine work, but it does well in getting it flat enough to run through the planer a little a time.
    Watch both the posted videos and come up with a hybrid.

    #367138
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Make a jig so that you can place the workpiece inside, and clamp it down that way. Then, the sled can ride on top of the jig.

    A Jig for a jig! This is getting complicated….maybe some type of clamping table would help out?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #367151

    LOL….yep, sounds like it doesn’t it.

    Not sure if I’d be trusting double sided tape to hold the workpiece though. There has to be a way of incorporating clamps into his jig. Would need to see the pics of how he built it, in order to determine how you could modify it.

    Make a jig so that you can place the workpiece inside, and clamp it down that way. Then, the sled can ride on top of the jig.

    A Jig for a jig! This is getting complicated….maybe some type of clamping table would help out?

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